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25 records – page 1 of 3.

Alterations in T-lymphocyte subsets among Danish haemophiliacs: relation to source of factor VIII preparations and high dose factor VIII treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39856
Source
Scand J Haematol. 1984 May;32(5):544-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1984
Author
J. Gerstoft
K. Bentsen
E. Scheibel
J. Dalsgård-Nielsen
J. Gormsen
E. Dickmeiss
Source
Scand J Haematol. 1984 May;32(5):544-51
Date
May-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alanine Transaminase - metabolism
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification
Denmark
Drug Industry
Europe
Factor VIII - therapeutic use
Hemophilia A - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Infant
Liver - enzymology
Middle Aged
T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer - classification
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory - classification
United States
Abstract
Screening of 43 healthy Danish haemophiliacs revealed a significantly lower helper/suppressor (H/S) ratio than in controls. 8 of the haemophiliacs had an H/S ratio less than or equal to 1.0. A significant negative correlation occurred between the total lifetime factor VIII treatment and the H/S ratio. However, high-dose factor VIII treatment given to patients with antibodies against factor VIII was not associated with immunological abnormalities. Children had a significantly higher H/S ratio than the adult haemophiliacs. Patients exclusively treated with Danish cryoprecipitate during the last year had a significantly higher H/S ratio than patients receiving preparations from other sources. This difference might, however, be explained by lower age and lower total lifetime dose in the group receiving Danish preparations. Haemophiliacs treated with American preparations did not differ immunologically from those treated with preparations of other origin. Total serum IgG was increased in 23% of the patients. This parameter was negatively correlated with the H/S ratio. The possible relation of the observed immunological alterations among otherwise healthy haemophiliacs to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome warrants further attention.
PubMed ID
6328639 View in PubMed
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Association of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus with cognitive functioning and risk of dementia in the general population: 11-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299655
Source
Brain Behav Immun. 2018 03; 69:480-485
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Minna Torniainen-Holm
Jaana Suvisaari
Maija Lindgren
Tommi Härkänen
Faith Dickerson
Robert H Yolken
Author Affiliation
Mental Health Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: minna.torniainen-holm@thl.fi.
Source
Brain Behav Immun. 2018 03; 69:480-485
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification
Dementia - epidemiology - virology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Herpesvirus 4, Human - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
Earlier studies have documented an association between cytomegalovirus and cognitive impairment, but results have been inconsistent. Few studies have investigated the association of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus with cognitive decline longitudinally. Our aim was to examine whether cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus are associated with cognitive decline in adults.
The study sample is from the Finnish Health 2000 Survey (BRIF8901, n?=?7112), which is representative of the Finnish adult population. The sample was followed up after 11?years in the Health 2011 Survey. In addition, persons with dementia were identified from healthcare registers.
In the Finnish population aged 30 and over, the seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus was estimated to be 84% and the seroprevalence of Epstein-Barr virus 98%. Seropositivity of the viruses and antibody levels were mostly not associated with cognitive performance. In the middle-aged adult group, cytomegalovirus serointensity was associated with impaired performance in verbal learning. However, the association disappeared when corrected for multiple testing. No interactions between infection and time or between the two infections were significant when corrected for multiple testing. Seropositivity did not predict dementia diagnosis.
The results suggest that adult levels of antibodies to cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus may not be associated with a significant decline in cognitive function or with dementia at population level.
PubMed ID
29355820 View in PubMed
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Congenital and acquired cytomegalovirus infections. Virological and clinical studies on a Swedish infant population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41689
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1978 May;67(3):321-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1978
Author
K. Ahlfors
S A Ivarsson
T. Johnsson
I. Svensson
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1978 May;67(3):321-8
Date
May-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Clinical Trials
Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification
Cytomegalovirus Infections - congenital - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Microcephaly - epidemiology
Prognosis
Psychomotor Disorders - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Serologic Tests
Sweden
Abstract
The study included two clinical materials. First, the frequency of cytomegalovirus and its clinical significance were studied among 661 Swedish children under one year of age admitted to a paediatric hospital. Before the age of one week 4/326 (1%) children excreted virus. At one month the frequency had risen to 6/52 (12%) and after this age the frequency was constant around 20--25%. Sixty per cent of infants born to immigrants were infected after one month of age. One of the four congenitally infected children had symptoms at birth followed by neurological sequelae. The majority of the infections acquired at birth or in early infancy seemed to be subclinical and without sequelae. Second, a retrospective investigation of 18 695 children born during a six-year period was performed. Two cases of virologically confirmed congenital cytomegalic inclusion disease was found. Regarding seven microcephalic patients in the retrospective study congenital CMV-infection could be excluded in four cases. In the remaining three cases the data did not permit any conclusions regarding the etiology.
PubMed ID
207077 View in PubMed
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Congenital cytomegalovirus infection and disease in Sweden and the relative importance of primary and secondary maternal infections. Preliminary findings from a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39977
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1984;16(2):129-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
K. Ahlfors
S A Ivarsson
S. Harris
L. Svanberg
R. Holmqvist
B. Lernmark
G. Theander
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1984;16(2):129-37
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification
Cytomegalovirus Infections - congenital - etiology
Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - etiology - microbiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
In a prospective Swedish study started in 1977 and still in progress 10 328 newborn infants in an urban district were investigated for cytomegalovirus (CMV) excretion in the urine by the virus isolation test. Congenital infection was found in 50 cases (0.5%). Of 47 infected infants with known clinical status at birth 9 (19%) had hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, jaundice and/or petechiae. The symptoms were moderate or mild. Of the infants followed up, 2 (25%) of 8 neonatally symptomatic ones and 3 (9%) of 35 asymptomatic ones developed neurologic sequelae. Altogether 5 (12%) of 43 had permanent neurologic symptoms corresponding to 0.06% in the general population. The children ranged in age from 6 months to 4 yr at the last examination. 21 mothers of the 47 infants with known status at birth had a confirmed or presumed primary infection, 15 a confirmed or presumed secondary infection and 11 an undetermined type of infection. Of the 5 infants with neurologic sequelae, 1 with a grave psychomotor retardation and deafness was born to a mother with a primary infection in the 1st trimester; 1 infant with a moderate retardation and 3 deaf infants were all exposed to confirmed or presumed secondary maternal infections. Prospective serological studies of maternal sera in early pregnancy would have suspected only the gravely retarded infant to be at risk.
PubMed ID
6330880 View in PubMed
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Diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infections using polymerase chain reaction, virus isolation and serology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36438
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(3):311-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
W. Xu
V A Sundqvist
M. Brytting
A. Linde
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, National Bacteriological Laboratory, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(3):311-6
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification
Cytomegalovirus Infections - congenital - diagnosis
Health status
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Infant
Irrigation
Leukocytes - microbiology
Middle Aged
Pharynx - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was compared with virus isolation and serology to establish which is the best method for the diagnosis of active cytomegalovirus, (CMV) infection. Samples of blood leucocytes, urine and throat washings from immunosuppressed patients and patients with congenitally acquired CMV infection, as well as from healthy persons, were examined with PCR. CMV DNA was detected in all samples from which CMV could be isolated, but not from any sample from healthy adults, whether CMV seropositive or CMV seronegative. In contrast to the findings in healthy persons, CMV genomes were frequently detected in urine and throat washings from immunosuppressed, CMV-seropositive patients without symptoms of CMV infection. The appearance of CMV genomes in blood cells in immunosuppressed CMV-seronegative patients may be the first sign of primary CMV infection. Congenital CMV infection could be rapidly and safely diagnosed when urine samples were examined by PCR. Nested PCR is a valuable tool for the diagnosis of active CMV infection, when selected materials are used.
PubMed ID
8395703 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of cytomegalovirus infection in low-birth weight children by breast milk using a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268330
Source
J Med Virol. 2015 May;87(5):845-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Maria Pilar Romero-Gómez
Marta Cabrera
María Teresa Montes-Bueno
Emilio Cendejas-Bueno
Cristina Segovia
Natividad Pastrana
Jesús Mingorance
Félix Omeñaca
Source
J Med Virol. 2015 May;87(5):845-50
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification
Cytomegalovirus Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission
DNA, Viral - isolation & purification
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Milk, Human - virology
Mothers
Prospective Studies
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sweden - epidemiology
Urine - virology
Abstract
Human Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common cause of intrauterine and perinatal infections worldwide. Postnatal CMV transmission has usually no consequences, but in some cases it may produce disease in preterm infants. Literature reports a broad range of breast milk-acquired CMV infections (5.7-58.6%), which depends on the study's design and the treatment of the milk. To evaluate CMV transmission via breast milk, a prospective study using a real-time PCR assay was performed. One hundred and thirty-one mothers (accounting for 160 children) accepted the participation in the study. Urine samples from the infants and breast milk samples from their mothers were collected at 3, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days after delivery. CMV-DNA in breast milk was analysed by quantitative real-time PCR assay Affigene® CMV Trender (Cepheid, Bromma, Sweden). The breast milk samples from 92 mothers (92 of 131, 70.2%) were positive for CMV by PCR. CMV infection was detected in thirteen children by PCR, and four of them (30.7%) had clinical symptoms. There were not significant differences in morbidity between symptomatic and non- symptomatic patients; nonetheless, the average length of hospitalization in symptomatic children was higher than that of non-symptomatic children (P?
PubMed ID
25690782 View in PubMed
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Generalized cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and CMV-induced pneumonitis in the rat: combined effect of 9-(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl)guanine and specific antibody treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57690
Source
Antiviral Res. 1994 Oct;25(2):147-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
F S Stals
S S Wagenaar
C A Bruggeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
Source
Antiviral Res. 1994 Oct;25(2):147-60
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - therapeutic use
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Combined Modality Therapy
Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification
Cytomegalovirus Infections - drug therapy - immunology - therapy
Ganciclovir - therapeutic use
Immune Sera
Immunization, Passive
Immunocompromised Host
Lung - virology
Lung Diseases, Interstitial - drug therapy - immunology - therapy - virology
Male
Pneumonia, Viral - drug therapy - immunology - therapy
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Spleen - virology
Abstract
The combined effect of 9-(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl)guanine (DHPG, ganciclovir) and hyper immune serum (HIS) was studied in two different rat models. In the first model, a lethal generalized rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV) infection was established in immunosuppressed Brown Norway (BN) rats. Treatment with DHPG or hyper immune serum (HIS) effectively reduced both mortality rate and virus titers in the liver and lungs. By combined treatment the effective dose of both DHPG and HIS was reduced to 25%. The fractionary effective dose was 0.5, indicating a moderate synergistic effect on survival. Combined treatment also established a significant reduction of virus titers in lungs and liver (P
PubMed ID
7847876 View in PubMed
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[Herpesvirus infections in immunocompromised patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151743
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2009 Jan-Feb;(1):79-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
M Iu Kalugina
N V Karazhas
V I Kozina
R M Balabanova
T M Ermakova
T N Rybalkina
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2009 Jan-Feb;(1):79-80
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Comorbidity
Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification
Cytomegalovirus Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
Female
Herpesvirus 1, Cercopithecine - isolation & purification
Herpesvirus 4, Human - isolation & purification
Humans
Immunocompromised Host - immunology
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Roseolovirus Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
Abstract
Testing of immunocompromised patients for markers of beta-herpesviruses--human herpesvirus type 6 (HHV-6) and cytomegalovirus (CMV), as well as gamma-herpesvirus--Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), revealed that all mentioned infections are frequently detected, mainlyas mixed infections. Chronic HHV-6 infection was diagnosed in more than half of the patients, whereas markers of acute phase of CMV and EBV infections were detected in 25% and 15% of patients respectively.
PubMed ID
19338241 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.