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Age-specific mortality risk from pandemic influenza.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131986
Source
J Theor Biol. 2011 Nov 7;288:29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-7-2011
Author
Junling Ma
Jonathan Dushoff
David J D Earn
Author Affiliation
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada.
Source
J Theor Biol. 2011 Nov 7;288:29-34
Date
Nov-7-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cytokines - biosynthesis
Humans
Infant
Influenza, Human - immunology - mortality
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Orthomyxoviridae - immunology
Pandemics
Risk Assessment - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Younger age groups account for proportionally more mortality in influenza pandemics than in seasonal influenza epidemics. Mechanisms that might explain this include young people suffering from an over-reactive immune system ("cytokine storm"), older people benefiting from cross-immunity from a wider variety of previous influenza infections ("antigenic history"), and lifetime immune responses in all people being shaped by their first influenza A infection ("antigenic imprinting" or "original antigenic sin"). We examined whether these mechanisms can explain age-specific influenza mortality patterns, using the complete database of individual deaths in Canada from 1951 to 1999. The mortality pattern during the 1957 pandemic indicates that antigenic imprinting plays an important role in determining age-specific influenza virulence and that both shift years and major drift years contribute significantly to antigenic imprints. This information should help pandemic planners to identify age groups that might respond differently to novel influenza strains.
PubMed ID
21856313 View in PubMed
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Alterations in lymphocyte function and relation to phospholipid composition after burn injury in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189117
Source
Crit Care Med. 2002 Aug;30(8):1753-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Vera C Pratt
Edward E Tredget
M Thomas Clandinin
Catherine J Field
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Ed-monton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Crit Care Med. 2002 Aug;30(8):1753-61
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antigens, CD - biosynthesis - immunology
Blood Cells - immunology
Burns - immunology - physiopathology - therapy
Canada
Cytokines - biosynthesis - immunology
Cytotoxicity, Immunologic - immunology
Enteral Nutrition
Female
Humans
Killer Cells, Natural - immunology
Lymphocytes - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Phospholipids - chemistry - physiology
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
alpha-Linolenic Acid - metabolism - therapeutic use
Abstract
Lymphocyte functions are dependent on fatty acid composition of membranes, and impaired functions can predispose patients to infection after burn injury. The current study was designed to describe changes in lymphocyte-phospholipid composition and lymphocyte-related immune functions from early to late recovery time points after burn injury.
Prospective observational.
Firefighter's Burn Treatment Center, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Subjects (n = 10) with >10% total body surface burn area.
Blood was drawn from subjects at specific time points (0 days to >50 days) after burn injury. Fatty acid composition of the major phospholipid classes of isolated lymphocytes was determined by using gas liquid chromatography. Lymphocyte phenotypes and proliferation ([(3)H]-thymidine uptake and interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma production) in response to mitogens were determined. Lymphocyte phospholipid 20:4n-6 content was 30% to 60% lower early compared with late postburn time points (p
PubMed ID
12163788 View in PubMed
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Altered cytokine profiles in patients with Chuvash polycythemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153848
Source
Am J Hematol. 2009 Feb;84(2):74-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Xiaomei Niu
Galina Y Miasnikova
Adelina I Sergueeva
Lydia A Polyakova
Daniel J Okhotin
Nikolai V Tuktanov
Mehdi Nouraie
Tatiana Ammosova
Sergei Nekhai
Victor R Gordeuk
Author Affiliation
Center for Sickle Cell Disease and Department of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, District of Columbia 20060, USA.
Source
Am J Hematol. 2009 Feb;84(2):74-8
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors - physiology
CD4-CD8 Ratio
Cell Hypoxia - genetics
Child
Cytokines - biosynthesis - blood - genetics
Erythropoietin - biosynthesis - blood - genetics
Ethnic Groups - genetics
Exons - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit - physiology
Interleukins - biosynthesis - blood - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Point Mutation
Polycythemia - blood - ethnology - genetics
Russia - epidemiology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - analysis - biosynthesis - genetics
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A - biosynthesis - blood - genetics
Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein - genetics - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Chuvash polycythemia results from a homozygous 598C>T mutation in exon 3 of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene. This disrupts the normoxia pathway for degrading hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha and HIF-2alpha causing altered expression of HIF-1 and HIF-2 inducible genes. As hypoxia induces expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, we hypothesized that there might be an elevation of Th1 cytokines in the setting of Chuvash polycythemia. We analyzed plasma concentrations of Th1 (interleukins-2 and 12, interferon-gamma, granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor-alpha) and Th2 cytokines (interleukins-4, 5, 10, and 13) using the Bio-Plex multiplex suspension array system in 34 VHL598C>T homozygotes and 32 VHL wild-type participants from Chuvashia. Concentrations of all the Th1 and Th2 cytokines measured were elevated in the VHL598C>T homozygotes compared with the control wild-type participants, but the ratios of Th1 to Th2 cytokines did not differ by genotype. In parallel, peripheral blood concentrations of CD4 positive T-helper cells and CD4/CD8 ratio were lower in the VHL598C>T homozygotes. In conclusion, the up-regulated hypoxic response in Chuvash polycythemia is associated with increased plasma products of both the Th1 and Th2 pathways, but the balance between the two pathways seems to be preserved.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19062180 View in PubMed
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Alveolar macrophages of allergic resistant and susceptible strains of rats show distinct cytokine profiles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15450
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2001 Oct;126(1):9-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
J. Sirois
E Y Bissonnette
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine, Centre de recherche, Hôpital Laval, Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de l'Université Laval, Sainte-Foy, Canada.
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2001 Oct;126(1):9-15
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Animals
Asthma - immunology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - immunology
Cells, Cultured
Comparative Study
Cytokines - biosynthesis - genetics
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - immunology
Interleukins - biosynthesis - genetics
Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1 - biosynthesis - genetics
Macrophages, Alveolar - immunology
Nitric Oxide - biosynthesis
Ovalbumin - administration & dosage - immunology
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Th1 Cells - immunology
Th2 Cells - immunology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - biosynthesis - genetics
Abstract
Brown Norway rats are widely used as a model of asthma, whereas Sprague Dawley rats do not develop allergic reactions under the same conditions. Given the importance of alveolar macrophages (AM) in down-regulating cellular immune responses in the lung, we postulated that the different susceptibilities in the development of airway allergic reactions in these rat strains may be related to functional differences in their AM. We investigated the production of important mediators in asthma, namely tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-12, IL-13, nitric oxide (NO) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha), by AM of unsensitized Sprague Dawley and Brown Norway rats. AM were purified by adherence and stimulated with OX8 (anti-CD8 antibody) or LPS. OX8 stimulation significantly increased the release of TNF, IL-10 and NO in both strains of rats, whereas MIP-1alpha and IL-12 release were increased in Brown Norway rats only. Interestingly, stimulated AM from Sprague Dawley rats released significantly more TNF and less IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, MIP-1alpha and NO compared with AM from Brown Norway rats. These differences were also observed at the mRNA level, except for TNF. Thus, AM from Brown Norway and Sprague Dawley rats are functionally different. Furthermore, LPS- and OX8-stimulated AM from Brown Norway rats produce more Th2 type cytokines (IL-10 and IL-13) than AM from Sprague Dawley rats, suggesting that these cells may play an important role in creating a cytokine milieu that may favour the development of allergic reactions.
PubMed ID
11678894 View in PubMed
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"Bystander" amplification of PBMC cytokine responses to seasonal allergen in polysensitized atopic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31878
Source
Allergy. 2001 Nov;56(11):1042-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
A. Rudin
C. Macaubas
C. Wee
B J Holt
P D Slya
P G Holt
Author Affiliation
TVW Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, and Centre for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
Source
Allergy. 2001 Nov;56(11):1042-8
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - adverse effects - immunology
Animals
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Bystander Effect
Child
Child Welfare
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Cytokines - biosynthesis - immunology
Dust - adverse effects
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - etiology - immunology
Immunization
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Leukocytes, Mononuclear - immunology - metabolism
Lolium - adverse effects - immunology
Mites - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Skin Tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Atopic children show increased expression and production of the Th2-associated cytokines IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-9 from PBMCs after stimulation with allergen, but it has previously not been clearly determined whether the Th2-cytokine production is restricted to the inhalant allergen the child is sensitized to, and whether perennial or seasonal allergens induce different cytokine responses. Our purpose was to determine whether in vitro Th2 cytokine production is specific to the sensitizing allergen, and to compare the cytokine responses to a perennial and a seasonal allergen in monosensitized and polysensitized children. METHODS: Using semiquantitative RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of the cytokines IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-9, IL-10, and IFN-gamma after stimulation of PBMCs with house-dust-mite (HDM) or ryegrass allergen. The cells were sampled from groups of 6-year-old children sensitized to either HDM (n=20) or ryegrass (n=24), or to both allergens (n=20), as well as from a nonatopic group (n=20). RESULTS: After stimulation with HDM allergen, PBMCs from children sensitized only to HDM expressed increased mRNA levels of the Th2 cytokines, but not of IL-10 and IFN-gamma, whereas ryegrass stimulation did not result in increased cytokine expression. PBMCs from children sensitized to HDM and ryegrass expressed increased Th2 cytokines after stimulation with either of the two allergens. In contrast, PBMCs from children sensitized only to ryegrass did not express increased levels after stimulation with either of the allergens. CONCLUSIONS: The expression of Th2 cytokines after in vitro stimulation of PBMCs from atopic children is specific to the sensitizing allergen, indicating that atopic status per se does not affect the type of T-cell response. In addition, T cells specific to seasonal allergens circulate in the blood out of season only if the child is concomitantly sensitized to a perennial allergen.
PubMed ID
11703216 View in PubMed
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Bystander effect of normal fibroblasts for macrophages co-cultured with susceptible transformed target cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17152
Source
Cell Biol Int. 2005 Jan;29(1):41-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Nataliya Kashchak
Roman Tsaryk
Rostyslav Stoika
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cell Biology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 14/16 Drahomanov Str., 79005 Lviv, Ukraine.
Source
Cell Biol Int. 2005 Jan;29(1):41-50
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bystander Effect - physiology
Cell Line
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic
Coculture Techniques
Cytokines - biosynthesis - genetics
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Fibroblasts - physiology
Gene Expression
Macrophages - physiology
Mice
NIH 3T3 Cells
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Macrophages attack and kill pathologically changed, transformed and tumor cells. However, in some cases they may also support tumor growth, modulate the action of anticancer drugs, and even facilitate the development of drug resistance in tumor cells. Here we present data that bystander fibroblasts NIH3T3 were not only resistant to murine macrophages J774.2 but also blocked their killing action towards murine transformed fibroblasts L929. Macrophages were isolated from mixed cultures by means of CD11b specific immunomagnetic beads, and changes induced by their former co-culturing were studied using DNA microarray technology and other tests. An expression of candidate genes coding for cytokines and for signal transduction pathway proteins was estimated in macrophages in different variants of their co-culture with target cells. Changes in expression of mRNA for interleukin 1beta, NFkappaB, IkappaBalpha, gadd45, and CD5 were detected as the most prominent in the macrophages co-cultured with the transformed cells. Bystander NIH3T3 fibroblasts abolished these changes in the macrophages J774.2, and the level of expression of the above mentioned genes was close to the level seen in the macrophages which did not exert cytotoxicity towards the target fibroblasts. Potential implications and research perspectives of using the macrophage-target cell co-cultures with different bystander cellular partners are discussed.
PubMed ID
15763498 View in PubMed
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CD8+ alphabeta T cells can mediate late airway responses and airway eosinophilia in rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57391
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Dec;114(6):1345-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Susumu Isogai
Rame Taha
Meiyo Tamaoka
Yasuyuki Yoshizawa
Qutayba Hamid
James G Martin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Dec;114(6):1345-52
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoptive Transfer
Animals
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - immunology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Cytokines - biosynthesis
Eosinophilia - etiology
Lung Diseases - etiology
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, alpha-beta - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The function of CD8+ T-cell subsets in mediating late allergic responses is incompletely understood. OBJECTIVE: We sought to test the hypothesis that CD8+ alphabeta T cells are proinflammatory in the airways in vivo by using a well-characterized animal model and the technique of adoptive transfer. METHODS: Brown Norway rats were administered CD8 + alphabeta T cells (10 6 ) intraperitoneally purified from lymph node cells of either naive or ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized rats and were challenged with aerosolized OVA 2 days later. Control rats were sensitized to 100 mug of OVA in Al(OH) 3 subcutaneously or sham sensitized to saline and were OVA challenged 2 weeks later. RESULTS: The OVA-sensitized and OVA-challenged group and the recipients of OVA-primed CD8+ alphabeta T cells had significant late airway responses calculated from lung resistance measured for an 8-hour period after challenge compared with the naive CD8 + alphabeta T cell-transferred group and the sham-sensitized control group. The number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid increased in the OVA-sensitized group and the OVA-primed CD8+ alphabeta T-cell recipients compared with numbers in the naive CD8+ alphabeta T-cell recipients and the sham-sensitized control group. IL-4 and IL-5 cytokine mRNA expression in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid increased in the OVA-sensitized group and the OVA-primed CD8+ alphabeta T-cell recipients compared with that in the sham-sensitized group. CONCLUSION: We conclude that antigen-primed CD8 + alphabeta T cells might have a proinflammatory role in allergen-driven airway responses in the rat.
PubMed ID
15577833 View in PubMed
Less detail

CD8+ T cells modulate late allergic airway responses in Brown Norway rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57532
Source
J Immunol. 1999 Nov 15;163(10):5574-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1999
Author
M. Suzuki
R. Taha
D. Ihaku
Q. Hamid
J G Martin
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Immunol. 1999 Nov 15;163(10):5574-81
Date
Nov-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoptive Transfer
Animals
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology - immunology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology - metabolism - transplantation
Cytokines - biosynthesis
Flow Cytometry
Hypersensitivity, Delayed - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Leukocytes, Mononuclear - cytology - immunology
Lymph Nodes - cytology - immunology - metabolism
Lymphocyte Count
Lymphocyte Subsets - cytology - immunology
Male
Ovalbumin - blood - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spleen - cytology - immunology - metabolism
Abstract
To test the hypothesis that CD8+ T cells may suppress the allergen-induced late airway response (LAR) and airway eosinophilia, we examined the effect of administration of Ag-primed CD8+ T cells on allergic airway responses, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) leukocytes, and mRNA expression for cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-gamma) in OVA-sensitized Brown Norway rats. On day 12 postsensitization to OVA, test rats were administered 2 million CD8+ T cells i.p. isolated from either the cervical lymph nodes (LN group; n = 8) or the spleen (Spl group; n = 6) of sensitized donors. On day 14, test rats were challenged with aerosolized OVA. Control rats were administered PBS i.p. on day 12, and challenged with OVA (n = 10) or BSA (n = 6) on day 14. The lung resistance was measured for 8 h after challenge. BAL was performed at 8 h. Cytospin slides of BAL were analyzed for major basic protein by immunostaining and for cytokine mRNA by in situ hybridization. The LAR was significantly less in the LN group (1.8 +/- 0.5 U; p
PubMed ID
10553086 View in PubMed
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Cytokine expression, upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and leukocyte infiltration in experimental tubulointerstitial nephritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57699
Source
Lab Invest. 1994 May;70(5):631-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
W W Tang
L. Feng
J C Mathison
C B Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California.
Source
Lab Invest. 1994 May;70(5):631-8
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies
Antisense Elements (Genetics)
Base Sequence
Basement Membrane - immunology
Cattle
Cell Adhesion Molecules - biosynthesis
Comparative Study
Cytokines - biosynthesis
DNA Primers
Gene Expression
Gene Expression Regulation
Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases - analysis - biosynthesis
Immunization
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
Interleukin-1 - biosynthesis
Kidney Cortex - metabolism - pathology
Kidney Tubules - immunology
Leukocytes - metabolism - pathology
Molecular Sequence Data
Nephritis, Interstitial - immunology - metabolism - pathology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
RNA Probes
RNA, Messenger - analysis - biosynthesis - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - biosynthesis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cytokines are intercellular polypeptide messengers that mediate immune and inflammatory responses. The temporal profile of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) expression was examined in anti-tubular basement membrane (TBM) antibody-associated tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: TIN was induced by immunization of Brown Norway rats with bovine cortical TBM, whereas control rats received ovalbumin. Whole kidney RNA was assessed with the RNase protection assay 3, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, and 14 days after immunization. Cytokine mRNA expression was correlated with TNF-alpha bioactivity, renal intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, and CD18-positive leukocyte infiltration by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Increased IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and MCP-1 mRNA relative to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase appeared on day 7 when TIN involved 10 to 40% of the cortex, and peaked rapidly on day 8 when there was 60 to 80% cortical involvement (at which time 75 to 80% of the infiltrating cells were neutrophils). The increase in TNF-alpha mRNA correlated with increased bioactivity. The influx of mononuclear cells on day 8 was preceded by the expression of MCP-1 mRNA. The infiltrating leukocytes expressed the leukocyte beta 2-integrin (CD18) and were found in areas with increased intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression. The mRNAs for IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and MCP-1 were undetectable by day 10 (at which time 95% of the infiltrating cells were mononuclear). An increase in IL-1 receptor antagonist mRNA paralleled those of IL-1 beta. The expression of IL-6 mRNA was similar to that for IL-1, except that it disappeared by day 9. CONCLUSIONS: There is a temporal association in the expression of IL-1 beta, TNF alpha, MCP-1, and IL-6 with the upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and leukocyte infiltration within the tubulointerstitium in anti-TBM antibody-associated TIN. The narrow window of time through which these cytokines are expressed and the coincidence of their peak expression on day 8 suggest complex cytokine interactions in the pathogenesis of anti-TBM antibody TIN.
PubMed ID
7910873 View in PubMed
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Cytokines and soluble tumour necrosis factor I receptor levels during pretransplant conditioning in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17331
Source
Int Immunopharmacol. 2005 Jan;5(1):67-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Johnny Andersen
Carsten Heilmann
Niels Jacobsen
Klaus Bendtzen
Klaus Müller
Author Affiliation
Institute for Inflammation Research, The National University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int Immunopharmacol. 2005 Jan;5(1):67-71
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antilymphocyte Serum - therapeutic use
Child
Cytokines - biosynthesis - blood
Denmark
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Flow Cytometry
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Inflammation - blood - etiology
Leukemia, Myeloid - blood - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Preoperative Care
Prognosis
Receptors, Interleukin-1 - biosynthesis
Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I - analysis - biosynthesis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Whole-Body Irradiation
Abstract
The inflammatory response induced by the conditioning regime may be related to the outcome in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (SCT). However, previous statements concerning the prognostic significance of cytokine measurements during conditioning have not been conclusive. We investigated a broad range of cytokines in plasma samples drawn daily immediately before start of pretransplant conditioning and during the conditioning. The presented data indicate that single-day measurements of inflammatory cytokines during conditioning may lead to unreliable conclusions concerning their prognostic significance. However, serial quantitation of soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor I (sTNFRI) is more likely to reflect the degree of inflammatory activation induced by pretransplant conditioning.
PubMed ID
15589461 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.