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5-years later - have faculty integrated medical genetics into nurse practitioner curriculum?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106400
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ann H Maradiegue
Quannetta T Edwards
Diane Seibert
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Practice Nursing - education
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Faculty, Nursing
Genetics, Medical - education
Humans
Molecular Medicine - education
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing
United States
Abstract
Abstract Many genetic/genomic educational opportunities are available to assist nursing faculty in their knowledge and understanding of genetic/genomics. This study was conducted to assess advance practice nursing faculty members' current knowledge of medical genetics/genomics, their integration of genetics/genomics content into advance practice nursing curricula, any prior formal training/education in genetics/genomics, and their comfort level in teaching genetics/genomic content. A secondary aim was to conduct a comparative analysis of the 2010 data to a previous study conducted in 2005, to determine changes that have taken place during that time period. During a national nurse practitioner faculty conference, 85 nurse practitioner faculty voluntarily completed surveys. Approximately 70% of the 2010 faculty felt comfortable teaching basic genetic/genomic concepts compared to 50% in 2005. However, there continue to be education gaps in the genetic/genomic content taught to advance practice nursing students. If nurses are going to be a crucial member of the health-care team, they must achieve the requisite competencies to deliver the increasingly complex care patients require.
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10: doi/10.1515/ijnes-2013-0094
PubMed ID
24176964 View in PubMed
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The 15-Minute Family Interview as a learning strategy for senior undergraduate nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117158
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2013 May;19(2):230-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Lorraine Holtslander
Jessica Solar
Nicole R Smith
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. lorraine.holtslander@usask.ca
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2013 May;19(2):230-48
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Family Nursing - education - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, Nursing
Students, Nursing
Abstract
Nursing care of families continues to be a challenge within complex and demanding health-care systems. Educational strategies to bridge the theory-practice gap, connecting classroom learning with clinical experiences in undergraduate nursing education, enable students to develop the skills required to form meaningful partnerships with families. This article describes how undergraduate nursing students complete a 15-Minute Family Interview in a clinical practice setting, and document the interview process in a reflective major paper. Students integrate research and theory and identify ways to improve the care of families in the clinical setting while building communication skills and confidence in interacting with families in everyday practice. The implementation of the assignment and the evaluation of the process, including quotes from 10 student papers and 2 clinical faculty members, are discussed. Implications for education and ongoing research are offered.
PubMed ID
23329627 View in PubMed
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25-year analysis of a dental undergraduate research training program (BSc Dent) at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154080
Source
J Dent Res. 2008 Dec;87(12):1085-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
J E Scott
J. de Vries
A M Iacopino
Author Affiliation
Oral Biology, University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 2008 Dec;87(12):1085-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aptitude Tests
Career Choice
Cohort Studies
Curriculum
Decision Making
Dental Research - education - trends
Education, Dental - trends
Education, Dental, Graduate - trends
Educational Measurement
Evidence-Based Dentistry - education
Faculty, Dental
Humans
Manitoba
Program Development
Schools, Dental - trends
Students, Dental
Abstract
Research in the context of the dental school has traditionally been focused on institutional/faculty accomplishments and generating new knowledge to benefit the profession. Only recently have significant efforts been made to expand the overall research programming into the formal dental curriculum, to provide students with a baseline exposure to the research and critical thinking processes, encourage evidence-based decision-making, and stimulate interest in academic/research careers. Various approaches to curriculum reform and the establishment of multiple levels of student research opportunities are now part of the educational fabric of many dental schools worldwide. Many of the preliminary reports regarding the success and vitality of these programs have used outcomes measures and metrics that emphasize cultural changes within institutions, student research productivity, and student career preferences after graduation. However, there have not been any reports from long-standing programs (a minimum of 25 years of cumulative data) that describe dental school graduates who have had the benefit of research/training experiences during their dental education. The University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry initiated a BSc Dent program in 1980 that awarded a formal degree for significant research experiences taking place within the laboratories of the Faculty-based researchers and has continued to develop and expand this program. The success of the program has been demonstrated by the continued and increasing demands for entry, the academic achievements of the graduates, and the numbers of graduates who have completed advanced education/training programs or returned to the Faculty as instructors. Analysis of our long-term data validates many recent hypotheses and short-term observations regarding the benefits of dental student research programs. This information may be useful in the design and implementation of dental student research programs at other dental schools.
PubMed ID
19029073 View in PubMed
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2009 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology educational needs assessment report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149186
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2009 Aug;23(8):560-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Alaa Rostom
Sandra Daniels
Author Affiliation
CAG Education Affairs.
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2009 Aug;23(8):560-7
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Gastroenterology - education
Humans
Needs Assessment
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
19668802 View in PubMed
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The ability of general practitioners to detect mental disorders in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216423
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
M. Joukamaa
V. Lehtinen
H. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Primary Health Care
Psychiatry - education
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Sampling Studies
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Abstract
The ability to detect mental disorders varies greatly among general practitioners in primary health care. The aim of this study was to determine the factors underlying the differences between general practitioners in the ability to recognize mental disorders in Finnish patient populations. The group studied consisted of 1000 randomly selected adult patients of primary care facilities in the city of Turku. The Symptom Checklist (SCL-25) was used as the reference method in the identification of psychiatric cases. According to the SCL-25, one fourth of the sample had mental disorders. A good recognition ability was associated with postgraduate psychiatric training and qualification as a specialist in general practice. Surprisingly, Balint group training, which is a method intended to improve the ability of general practitioners to manage their patients' mental health problems, was associated rather with poor than good detection ability.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Oct;92(4):3198848961
PubMed ID
7754788 View in PubMed
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[ABOUT PROFESSIONAL TRAINING OF ROENTGENOLOGISTS FOR WORKING ON MAGNETIC RESONANCE TOMOGRAPHIC SCANNER].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267005
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2015 Mar-Apr;23(2):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
A V Korobov
A N Morozov
V G Pasechnaia
N V Fediainova
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2015 Mar-Apr;23(2):38-42
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Radiology - education
Russia
Abstract
The article considers main problems conditioned demand of development of model of professional training of roentgenologists for working on magnetic resonance tomographic scanner in conditions of non-public medical diagnostic center in accordance with the concept of continuous medical education. The developed model is presented in graphic form i.e. folded in the form of generic structure and unfolded in the form of algorithmic and structural models of separate blocks. The detailed description of components of model and their functional designation are presented.
PubMed ID
26399071 View in PubMed
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Academic careers in medical education: perceptions of the effects of a faculty development program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200453
Source
Acad Med. 1999 Oct;74(10 Suppl):S72-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999

Academic family physicians' perception of genetic testing and integration into practice: a CERA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115009
Source
Fam Med. 2013 Apr;45(4):257-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Arch G Mainous
Sharleen P Johnson
Svetlana Chirina
Richard Baker
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. mainouag@musc.edu
Source
Fam Med. 2013 Apr;45(4):257-62
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Faculty, Medical
Family Practice - education - methods
Female
Genetic Testing - methods
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Middle Aged
Self Report
United States
Abstract
Genetic testing for a variety of diseases is becoming more available to primary care physicians, but it is unclear how useful physicians perceive these tests to be. We examined academic family physicians' perception of and experiences with clinical genetic testing and direct-to-consumer genetic testing.
This study is an analysis of a survey conducted as part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA). Academic family physicians in the United States and Canada were queried about their perception of genetic testing's utility, how frequently patients ask about genetic testing, and the importance of genetic testing in future practice and education of students and residents.
The overall survey had a response rate of 45.1% (1,404/3,112). A majority (54.4%) of respondents felt that they were not knowledgeable about available genetic tests. Respondents perceived greater utility of genetic tests for breast cancer (94.9%) and hemochromatosis (74.9%) than for Alzheimer's disease (30.3%), heart disease (25.4%), or diabetes (25.2%). Individuals with greater self-perceived knowledge of genetic tests were more likely to feel that genetic testing would have a significant impact on their future practice (23.1%) than those with less knowledge (13.4%). Respondents had little exposure to direct-to-consumer genetic tests, but a majority felt that they were more likely to cause harm than benefit.
Academic family physicians acknowledge their lack of knowledge about genetic tests. Educational initiatives may be useful in helping them incorporate genetic testing into practice and in teaching these skills to medical students and residents.
PubMed ID
23553089 View in PubMed
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Achieved competences in temporomandibular disorders/orofacial pain: a comparison between two dental schools in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279263
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2015 Aug;19(3):161-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Z. Alsafi
A. Michelotti
R. Ohrbach
M. Nilner
T. List
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2015 Aug;19(3):161-8
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Dental
Facial pain
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Schools, Dental
Students, Dental
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
Abstract
The aim was to study achieved competences in temporomandibular disorders (TMD)/orofacial pain (OP) at two universities by comparing student's knowledge and understanding, satisfaction with their education and confidence in their clinical competences of TMD/OP.
The study was conducted in collaboration between Malmö University, Sweden—which uses problem-based learning—and the University of Naples Federico II, Italy—which uses traditional educational methods. Final-semester dental students responded to a self-report questionnaire regarding their knowledge and understanding, interpretation of cases histories, clinical experience, satisfaction and confidence in clinical examination, management and treatment evaluation.
No significant difference was found between the students regarding knowledge and understanding. Eighty-seven per cent of the Malmö students and 96% of the Naples students met the criterion on achieved competence. Malmö students had a higher per cent of correct diagnoses than Naples students in the interpretation of case histories. Overall, Malmö students reported most clinical experience and higher confidence than Naple students.
The main findings were that students from Malmö and Naples were, similar in knowledge and understanding of TMD/OP and in satisfaction with their clinical competences. However, Malmö students perceived more confidence in clinical management of patients with TMD/OP. This may reflect that, besides the theoretical part of the programme, a sufficient level of clinical exposure to patients with TMD/OP is essential to gain competences in TMD/OP.
PubMed ID
25168490 View in PubMed
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1593 records – page 1 of 160.