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417 records – page 1 of 42.

Source
Nurs Sci Q. 2010 Oct;23(4):334-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Jeanne Evans
Jennifer L Bell
Annemarie E Sweeney
Jennifer I Morgan
Helen M Kelly
Author Affiliation
University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Nurs Sci Q. 2010 Oct;23(4):334-40
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Critical Care - manpower
Cultural Diversity
Humans
Nurses - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to gain an understanding of the nursing phenomenon, confidence, from the experience of nurses in the nursing subculture of critical care. Leininger's theory of cultural care diversity and universality guided this qualitative descriptive study. Questions derived from the sunrise model were used to elicit nurses' perspectives about cultural and social structures that exist within the critical care nursing subculture and the influence that these factors have on confidence. Twenty-eight critical care nurses from a large Canadian healthcare organization participated in semistructured interviews about confidence. Five themes arose from the descriptions provided by the participants. The three themes, tenuously navigating initiation rituals, deliberately developing holistic supportive relationships, and assimilating clinical decision-making rules were identified as social and cultural factors related to confidence. The remaining two themes, preserving a sense of security despite barriers and accommodating to diverse challenges, were identified as environmental factors related to confidence. Practice and research implications within the culture of critical care nursing are discussed in relation to each of the themes.
PubMed ID
20871006 View in PubMed
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Researching health in diverse neighbourhoods: critical reflection on the use of a community research model in Uppsala, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297384
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2018 Aug 25; 11(1):612
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-25-2018
Author
Sarah Hamed
Sonja Klingberg
Amina Jama Mahmud
Hannah Bradby
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2018 Aug 25; 11(1):612
Date
Aug-25-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cultural Diversity
Health Services Research
Humans
Residence Characteristics
Sweden
Abstract
A community research model developed in the United Kingdom was adopted in a multi-country study of health in diverse neighbourhoods in European cities, including Sweden. This paper describes the challenges and opportunities of using this model in Sweden.
In Sweden, five community researchers were recruited and trained to facilitate access to diverse groups in the two study neighbourhoods, including ethnic, religious, and linguistic minorities. Community researchers recruited participants from the neighbourhoods, and assisted during semi-structured interviews. Their local networks, and knowledge were invaluable for contextualising the study and finding participants. Various factors made it difficult to fully apply the model in Sweden. The study took place when an unprecedented number of asylum-seekers were arriving in Sweden, and potential collaborators' time was taken up in meeting their needs. Employment on short-term, temporary contracts is difficult since Swedish Universities are public authorities. Strong expectations of stable full-time employment, make flexible part-time work undesirable. The community research model was only partly successful in embedding the research project as a collaboration between community members and the University. While there was interest and some involvement from neighbourhood residents, the research remained University-led with a limited sense of community ownership.
PubMed ID
30144812 View in PubMed
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Falling short in organized dentistry: a call for increased diversity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108211
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2013;79:d100
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ernest Lam
Author Affiliation
Canadian Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Toronto faculty of dentistry.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2013;79:d100
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cultural Diversity
Dentistry - manpower - organization & administration
Dentists, Women
Humans
PubMed ID
23920066 View in PubMed
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Source
Nurs BC. 1996 Mar-Apr;28(2):4-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Bruce
Source
Nurs BC. 1996 Mar-Apr;28(2):4-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Cultural Diversity
Humans
Nurses
Nursing Care - standards
Societies, Nursing
PubMed ID
8716007 View in PubMed
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How different can you be and still survive? Homogeneity and difference in clinical nursing education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169528
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2004;1:Article2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Barbara L Paterson
Margaret Osborne
David Gregory
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia. bpaterso@unb.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2004;1:Article2
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Canada
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing
Humans
Social Conditions
Students, Nursing
Abstract
The article focuses on a component of a three-year institutional ethnography regarding the construction of cultural diversity in clinical education. Students in two Canadian schools of nursing described being a nursing student as bounded by unwritten and largely invisible expectations of homogeneity in the context of a predominant discourse of equality and cultural sensitivity. At the same time, they witnessed many incidents, both personally and those directed toward other individuals of the same culture, of clinical teachers problematizing difference and centering on difference as less than the expected norm. This complex and often contradictory experience of difference and homogeneity contributed to their construction of cultural diversity as a problem. The authors provide examples of how the perception of being different affected some students' learning in the clinical setting and their interactions with clinical teachers. They will illustrate that this occurred in the context of macro influences that shaped how both teachers and students experienced and perceived cultural diversity. The article concludes with a challenge to nurse educators to deconstruct their beliefs and assumptions about inclusivity in nursing education.
PubMed ID
16646885 View in PubMed
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[No "transfer"--the pediatrician is capable to take own decisions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29320
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Nov 14-20;102(46):3483
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gunnel BÃ¥genholm
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Nov 14-20;102(46):3483
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services
Cultural Diversity
Health Facility Merger
Humans
Sweden - ethnology
PubMed ID
16335732 View in PubMed
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Mental health promotion education in multicultural settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186591
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2003 Feb;23(2):96-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Nazilla Khanlou
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ont., Canada M5S 3H4. nazilla.khanlou@utoronto.ca
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2003 Feb;23(2):96-103
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Graduate
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing
Abstract
This paper addresses the education of graduate nursing students in mental health promotion in multicultural settings. First an overview of the historical development of health promotion theory in Canada is presented. Emerging concepts in mental health promotion are then considered. Referring to a graduate course on youth and mental health promotion, course design, which draws from across disciplines and recognizes the complexities in mental health promotion practice in multicultural settings, is illustrated. Under a mental health promotion perspective healthy development is recognized to arise from the interaction between people and systems in society, providing a systems-based understanding of the interplay between culture and health. The course's underlying threads, consisting of youth development and mental health, culture, and integration of learning through an intersectional perspective, and its related substantive content and process are discussed. It is concluded that by fostering students' critical awareness of intersections (for example, gender, life stage, migrant and racialized status), the growth and development of youth from diverse cultural backgrounds can be contextualized within existing support, or access barriers to, systems in multicultural societies.
PubMed ID
12593824 View in PubMed
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[Impaired child health service in northern Botkyrka after the merger between KS and Huddinge]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29326
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Oct 31-Nov 6;102(44):3247
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gösta Alfvén
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Oct 31-Nov 6;102(44):3247
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - standards
Cultural Diversity
Health Facility Merger
Humans
Sweden - ethnology
PubMed ID
16329456 View in PubMed
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Promoting health in multicultural populations

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2820
Source
Thousand Oaks, Calif: Sage Publications
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1999
Source
Thousand Oaks, Calif: Sage Publications
Date
1999
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
minorities, medical care, united states, health promotion, transcultural medical care, ethnic groups, cultural diversity
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Experiences of the Swedish healthcare system: An interview study with refugees in need of long-term health care

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101203
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):319-325
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Razavi, MF
Falk, L
Björn, A
Wilhelmsson, S
Author Affiliation
The International Medical Program, Linköping, Sweden
Centre for Teaching & Research in Disaster Medicine and Traumatology (KMC), Linköping, Sweden
The Research and Development (R&D) Unit of Local Health Care, County Council of Östergötland, Sweden
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping University, Sweden
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):319-325
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitudes
Content analysis
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Diversity
Health knowledge
Physician-Patient Relations
Practice
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Refugees needing long-term health care must adapt to new healthcare systems. The aim of this study was to examine the viewpoints of nine refugees in a county in Sweden, with a known chronic disease or functional impairment requiring long-term medical care, on their contacts with care providers regarding treatment and personal needs. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews with nine individuals and/or their next of kin. Inductive content analysis was used to identify experiences. RESULTS: "Care organizations/resources" and "professional competence" were the categories extracted. Participants felt cared for due to accessibility to and regular appointments with the same care provider. Visiting different clinics contributed to a negative experience and lack of trust. The staff's interest in participants' lives and health contributed to a sense of professionalism. Most participants said the problems experienced were not related to their backgrounds as refugees. Many patients did not fully understand which clinic they were attending or the purpose of the care that the specific clinic provided. Some lacked knowledge of their disease. CONCLUSIONS: Health care was perceived as equal to other Swedish citizens and problems experienced were not explained by refugee backgrounds. Lack of information from care providers and being sent to various levels of care created feelings of a lack of overall medical responsibility.
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417 records – page 1 of 42.