Skip header and navigation

Refine By

313 records – page 1 of 32.

Aboriginal Cultural Competency in Dietetics: A National Survey of Canadian Registered Dietitians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293524
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2017 12 01; 78(4):172-176
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-01-2017
Author
Paige Huycke
Jillian Ingribelli
Lee Rysdale
Author Affiliation
a Northern Ontario Dietetic Internship Program, Sault Ste. Marie, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2017 12 01; 78(4):172-176
Date
12-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Clinical Competence
Cultural Competency - education
Cultural Diversity
Diet
Dietary Services
Dietetics - education
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritionists - education
Ontario
Preceptorship
Young Adult
Abstract
Little has been published on cultural competency curriculum and dietetics considering the impact of food-related beliefs and behaviours on health. A 14-item online survey was administered in January 2016 to 145 participants (125 members of Dietitians of Canada Aboriginal Nutrition Network and 20 dietitians with an interest in Aboriginal nutrition). Questions included multiple choice and ranking responses and were pretested by 4 preceptors with the Northern Ontario Dietetic Internship Program (NODIP). Quantitative data analysis included frequencies, pivot tables, and averaging/grouping of ranking scores. A total of 42 individuals (29%) completed the survey. The majority rated the 5 health and cultural competencies and 6 food and nutrition competencies as "important" (90%-98% and 86%-100%, respectively). Overall, the competency related to identifying health status was ranked highest (78%), whereas developing culturally appropriate recipes was ranked lowest (83%). Most participants (95%) believed that all dietitians and graduating dietetic interns should be minimally competent in Aboriginal health and culture. The initial 11 draft competencies for dietetic interns were condensed to 6 minimum and 2 advanced competencies. Results will inform dietitians working with Aboriginal peoples and refinement of NODIP intern and preceptor tools, with the potential to integrate across Canadian dietetic internship programs.
PubMed ID
28333567 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal health workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124122
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anna P Dawson
Margaret Cargo
Harold Stewart
Alwin Chong
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
University of South Australia, Sansom Institute for Health Research, Social Epidemiology and Evaluation Research Group, GPO Box 2471, IPC: CEA-01, Adelaide, South Australia, 5001, Australia.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:27
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Competency
Delivery of Health Care - ethnology - methods
Female
Focus Groups
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Long-term measures to reduce tobacco consumption in Australia have had differential effects in the population. The prevalence of smoking in Aboriginal peoples is currently more than double that of the non-Aboriginal population. Aboriginal Health Workers are responsible for providing primary health care to Aboriginal clients including smoking cessation programs. However, Aboriginal Health Workers are frequently smokers themselves, and their smoking undermines the smoking cessation services they deliver to Aboriginal clients. An understanding of the barriers to quitting smoking experienced by Aboriginal Health Workers is needed to design culturally relevant smoking cessation programs. Once smoking is reduced in Aboriginal Health Workers, they may then be able to support Aboriginal clients to quit smoking.
We undertook a fundamental qualitative description study underpinned by social ecological theory. The research was participatory, and academic researchers worked in partnership with personnel from the local Aboriginal health council. The barriers Aboriginal Health Workers experience in relation to quitting smoking were explored in 34 semi-structured interviews (with 23 Aboriginal Health Workers and 11 other health staff) and 3 focus groups (n = 17 participants) with key informants. Content analysis was performed on transcribed text and interview notes.
Aboriginal Health Workers spoke of burdensome stress and grief which made them unable to prioritise quitting smoking. They lacked knowledge about quitting and access to culturally relevant quitting resources. Interpersonal obstacles included a social pressure to smoke, social exclusion when quitting, and few role models. In many workplaces, smoking was part of organisational culture and there were challenges to implementation of Smokefree policy. Respondents identified inadequate funding of tobacco programs and a lack of Smokefree public spaces as policy level barriers. The normalisation of smoking in Aboriginal society was an overarching challenge to quitting.
Aboriginal Health Workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking that include personal, social, cultural and environmental factors. Multidimensional smoking cessation programs are needed that reduce the stress and burden for Aboriginal Health Workers; provide access to culturally relevant quitting resources; and address the prevailing normalisation of smoking in the family, workplace and community.
Notes
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Feb;8(2):388-41021556193
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2011;32:327-4721219157
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2000 Aug;23(4):334-4010940958
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2001 May;11(3):291-211339074
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2002 Apr;26(2):120-412054329
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2002 Oct;26(5):426-3112413286
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2003 Dec;5 Suppl 1:S101-1714668090
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 Jan-Feb;95(1):45-914768741
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 1997 Dec;21(7):789-919489201
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 1998 Oct;22(6):648-529848957
Cites: Br Med J. 1950 Sep 30;2(4682):739-4814772469
Cites: J Am Med Assoc. 1950 May 27;143(4):329-3615415260
Cites: J Am Med Assoc. 1950 May 27;143(4):336-815415261
Cites: Med J Aust. 2006 May 15;184(10):529-3016719758
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;35(4):888-90116585055
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2007 Apr;31(2):174-617461010
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2008;29:325-5018173388
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2008 Apr;32(2):110-618412679
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jun;66(11):2378-8918313186
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1708-1618938006
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Apr;38(2):470-719047078
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2010 Feb;33(1):77-8420014004
Cites: J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2010;6:2620831827
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2011 Feb;35(1):47-5321299700
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:10222533609
PubMed ID
22621767 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acknowledging the past while looking to the future: conceptualizing indigenous child trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117696
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(4):55-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Shanley Swanson Nicolai
Merete Saus
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(4):55-74
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Cultural Characteristics
Cultural Competency
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Intergenerational Relations
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Montana
Norway
Politics
Population Groups - ethnology - psychology
Qualitative Research
Social Work - methods - standards
Stress Disorders, Traumatic - ethnology
Abstract
Trauma affects children from all ethnicities, nationalities and socioeconomic backgrounds. However, indigenous children may experience trauma differently than their majority population peers due to traumatic histories of colonization and marginalization. This article reports on an exploratory qualitative study of how service providers in Western Montana and Northern Norway conceptualize Native American and Sámi children's experiences of trauma today. Findings reveal that participants relate current trauma experiences of indigenous youth to historical and intergenerational traumas.
PubMed ID
24851475 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation of a smoking cessation and prevention website for urban American Indian/Alaska Native youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98333
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2010 Mar;25(1):23-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Maile Taualii
Nigel Bush
Deborah J Bowen
Ralph Forquera
Author Affiliation
Seattle Indian Health Board and the Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle, USA.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2010 Mar;25(1):23-31
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Advertising as Topic
Alaska
Child
Cultural Competency
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Internet
Male
Pilot Projects
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods
Urban Population
Abstract
Tobacco use among American Indian youth is a disproportionately significant problem. We adapted and modified an existing web-based and youth-focused tobacco control program to make it appropriate for young urban American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). The results of the focus group indicate that AI/AN youth were very receptive to the use of a web-based Zine-style intervention tool. They wanted the look and feel of the website to be more oriented toward their cultural images. Future research should examine if successful programs for reducing non-ceremonial tobacco use among urban AI/AN youth can keep young irregular smokers from becoming adult smokers.
PubMed ID
20082169 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adapting ACT to serve culturally diverse communities: a comparison of a Japanese and a Canadian ACT team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132554
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2011 Aug;62(8):971-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Wendy Chow
Miyuki Shiida
Takashi Shiida
Akiyoshi Hirosue
Samuel Law
Molyn Leszcz
Joel Sadavoy
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Univeristy of Toronto, Mount Sinai Hospital, 260 Spadina Ave., Suite 204, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2E4, Canada. wchow@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2011 Aug;62(8):971-4
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - methods
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Competency - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Japan
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Residence Characteristics
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The assertive community treatment (ACT) teams of Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto and the KUINA Center, Hitachinaka, Japan, were compared with regard to ACT fidelity, organizational structure, populations served, and treatment outcomes. Ethnocultural adaptations to the ACT model made by both teams included enhanced family support and intervention, culturally and linguistically matched staff and patients when possible, culturally informed therapy, routine cultural assessments, culturally matched housing and community support, and flexible funding models.
Data were gathered by chart reviews (66 patients in Toronto and 40 patients in Japan), a satisfaction measure, a standard measure of ACT fidelity, and a pre-post measure of treatment outcomes (the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale), and hospitalization days.
Both teams achieved good fidelity to ACT and reductions in hospitalization and symptom severity. Family satisfaction scores were high.
With culturally informed adaptations, ACT can be effective in a Canadian mixed ethnocultural population and a homogeneous Japanese population.
PubMed ID
21807841 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adapting and enhancing PAX Good Behavior Game for First Nations communities: a mixed-methods study protocol developed with Swampy Cree Tribal Council communities in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294532
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 02 15; 8(2):e018454
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-15-2018
Author
Janique Fortier
Mariette Chartier
Sarah Turner
Nora Murdock
Frank Turner
Jitender Sareen
Tracie O Afifi
Laurence Y Katz
Marni Brownell
James Bolton
Brenda Elias
Corinne Isaak
Roberta Woodgate
Depeng Jiang
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 02 15; 8(2):e018454
Date
02-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude
Child
Child Behavior
Child Behavior Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control
Cultural Competency
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Manitoba
Mental health
Play and Playthings
Program Evaluation
Research Design
Residence Characteristics
Reward
School Health Services
Schools
Social Behavior
Social Behavior Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
High rates of mental health problems, such as suicidal behaviours, among First Nations youth in Canada are a major public health concern. The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a school-based intervention that provides a nurturing environment for children and has been shown to promote positive outcomes. PAX Good Behavior Game (PAX GBG) is an adaptation and enhancement of the GBG. While PAX GBG has been implemented in Indigenous communities, little research exists examining the cultural and contextual appropriateness and effectiveness of the intervention in First Nations communities.
The present paper describes a protocol of the mixed-methods approach guided by an Indigenous ethical engagement model adopted to implement, adapt and evaluate PAX GBG in First Nations communities in Manitoba, Canada. First, implementation outcomes (eg, acceptability, adoption) of PAX GBG will be evaluated using qualitative interviews with teachers, principals and community members from Swampy Cree Tribal Council (SCTC) communities. Second, by linking administrative databases to programme data from schools in 38 First Nations communities, we will compare PAX GBG and control groups to evaluate whether PAX GBG is associated with improved mental health and academic outcomes. Third, the qualitative results will help inform a cultural and contextual adaptation of PAX GBG called First Nations PAX (FN PAX). Fourth, FN PAX will be implemented in a few SCTC communities and evaluated using surveys and qualitative interviews followed by the remaining communities the subsequent year.
Ethical approval was obtained from the University of Manitoba Health Research Ethics Board and will be obtained from the Health Information Privacy Committee and respective data providers for the administrative database linkages. Dissemination and knowledge translation will include community and stakeholder engagement throughout the research process, reports and presentations for policymakers and community members, presentations at scientific conferences and journal publications.
Notes
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2011 Sep;48(4):367-91 PMID 21911507
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2008 Jun 1;95 Suppl 1:S45-59 PMID 18243581
Cites: J Educ Psychol. 2009 Nov 1;101(4):926-937 PMID 23766545
Cites: Milbank Q. 2010 Sep;88(3):382-403 PMID 20860576
Cites: J Can Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Nov;15(4):159-67 PMID 18392204
Cites: Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev. 2008 Sep;11(3):75-113 PMID 18712600
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):20-42 PMID 22894005
Cites: BMJ. 2013 Nov 20;347:f6753 PMID 24259324
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2015 Jun 24;106(6):e375-81 PMID 26680428
Cites: Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev. 2002 Dec;5(4):273-97 PMID 12495270
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1994 Feb;35(2):259-81 PMID 8188798
Cites: J Prim Prev. 2017 Apr;38(1-2):67-86 PMID 27807659
Cites: Health Place. 2009 Jun;15(2):403-11 PMID 18760954
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2002 Jun;43(2):207-22 PMID 12096700
Cites: Depress Anxiety. 2013 Oct;30(10):1030-45 PMID 23650186
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2012 Jul;102(7):1353-61 PMID 22676500
Cites: J Sch Psychol. 2013 Apr;51(2):187-99 PMID 23481084
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Jun;51(3):299-319 PMID 24855142
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Apr;70(2):141-53 PMID 21524357
Cites: J Clin Psychol. 2011 Jan;67(1):99-110 PMID 20973032
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2008 Jun 1;95 Suppl 1:S60-73 PMID 18329189
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Oct;43(8):816-22 PMID 9806088
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Jan;52(1):39-47 PMID 9973072
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 May;74(10):1560-9 PMID 22464223
Cites: Int J Ment Health Syst. 2016 Sep 21;10 :58 PMID 27688797
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;48(4):400-3 PMID 19242383
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jan;66(1):117-29 PMID 17919795
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Nov;40(11):1337-45 PMID 11699809
Cites: Prev Sci. 2016 Feb;17 (2):145-56 PMID 26297498
Cites: Dev Psychol. 2003 Mar;39(2):292-308 PMID 12661887
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 May 17;183(8):E480-6 PMID 21555383
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2008 Jun 1;95 Suppl 1:S29-44 PMID 18249508
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2008 Jun 1;95 Suppl 1:S5-S28 PMID 18343607
Cites: Can J Aging. 2005 Spring;24 Suppl 1:153-70 PMID 16080132
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2011;32:91-108 PMID 21219160
Cites: J Appl Behav Anal. 1969 Summer;2(2):119-24 PMID 16795208
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;57(12):745-51 PMID 23228233
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;44(6):557-64 PMID 15908838
Cites: Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2015 Dec;61(8):788-95 PMID 25953776
PubMed ID
29449291 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adapting the Asthma Life Impact Scale (ALIS) for use in Southern European (Italian) and Eastern European (Russian) cultures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131506
Source
J Med Econ. 2011;14(6):729-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
J. Twiss
S P McKenna
S R Crawford
M. Tammaru
N C Oprandi
Author Affiliation
Galen Research Ltd, Manchester, UK. jtwiss@galen-research.com
Source
J Med Econ. 2011;14(6):729-38
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - ethnology - physiopathology - psychology
Cultural Competency
Female
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Respiratory Function Tests
Russia - epidemiology
Translating
Young Adult
Abstract
The Asthma Life Impact Scale (ALIS) is a disease-specific measure used to assess the quality-of-life of people with asthma. It was developed in the UK and US and has proven to be acceptable to patients, to have good psychometric properties, and to be unidimensional.
This paper reports on the adaptation and validation of the ALIS for use in representative Southern European (Italian) and Eastern European (Russian) languages.
The ALIS was translated for both cultures using the dual-panel process. The newly translated versions were then tested with asthma patients to ensure face and content validity. Psychometric properties of the new language versions were assessed via a test?re-test postal survey conducted in both countries.
It is possible that some cultural or language differences still exist between the different language versions. Further research should be undertaken to determine responsiveness. Further studies designed to determine the clinical validity of the Italian ALIS would be valuable.
Linguistic nuances were easily resolved during the translation process for both language adaptations. Cognitive debriefing interviews (Russia n=9, male=11.1%, age mean (SD)=55.4 (13.2); Italy n=15, male=66.7%, age mean (SD)=63.5 (11.2)) indicated that the ALIS was easy to read and acceptable to patients. Psychometric testing was conducted on the data (Russia n=61, age mean (SD)=40.7 (15.4); Italy n=71, male=42.6%, age mean (SD)=49.5 (14.1)). The results showed that the new versions of the ALIS were consistent (Russian and Italian Cronbach's alpha=0.92) and reproducible (Russian test-re-test=0.86; Italian test-re-test=0.94). The Italian adaptation showed the expected correlations with the NHP and the Russian adaptation showed strong correlations with the CASIS and CAFS and weak-to-moderate correlations with %FEV1 and %PEF. In both adaptations the ALIS was able to distinguish between participants based on self-reported general health, self-reported severity, and whether or not they were hospitalized in the previous week.
PubMed ID
21899487 View in PubMed
Less detail

ADDRESSING SUBSTANCE-USE PROBLEMS IN TRIBAL HOME VISITING.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299191
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):287-294
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Date
05-2018
Author
Douglas K Novins
Cathy Ferron
Lisa Abramson
Allison Barlow
Author Affiliation
University of Colorado, Aurora.
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):287-294
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Culturally Competent Care - methods
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
House Calls
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Maternal health services
Needs Assessment
New Mexico
Pregnancy
Referral and Consultation
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Washington
Young Adult
Abstract
Given the high rates for substance use among women and men of childbearing age, perinatal and early childhood home-visiting programs serving tribal communities must consider how they will address substance-use problems among the families they support. In this study, we explored the approaches to identifying and addressing family-based substance-use problems that were implemented by nine home-visiting programs serving American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities that are funded through the federal Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (Tribal MIECHV). These programs demonstrated a high awareness of substance-use problems and took concrete action to address them above and beyond that included in the home-visiting model they used. All nine programs reported that they provided substance-use preventive services and screened for substance-use problems. While all programs referred to substance-use treatment programs when needed, in six programs the home visitor provided substance-use services. Through Tribal MIECHV, the intense need for substance-use education, assessment, service delivery, and referral in many AI/AN communities is pushing the home-visiting field forward to address this increasingly critical issue for low-income families across the United States and the world.
PubMed ID
29722426 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advancing suicide prevention research with rural American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263749
Source
Am J Public Health. 2015 May;105(5):891-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Lisa Wexler
Michael Chandler
Joseph P Gone
Mary Cwik
Laurence J Kirmayer
Teresa LaFromboise
Teresa Brockie
Victoria O'Keefe
John Walkup
James Allen
Source
Am J Public Health. 2015 May;105(5):891-9
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Cultural Competency
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Rural Population
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
As part of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of AI/AN suicide research experts convened to outline pressing issues related to this subfield of suicidology. Suicide disproportionately affects Indigenous peoples, and remote Indigenous communities can offer vital and unique insights with relevance to other rural and marginalized groups. Outcomes from this meeting include identifying the central challenges impeding progress in this subfield and a description of promising research directions to yield practical results. These proposed directions expand the alliance's prioritized research agenda and offer pathways to advance the field of suicide research in Indigenous communities and beyond.
Notes
Cites: Arch Suicide Res. 2006;10(2):125-4016574612
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2009 Jun;43(3-4):267-7619390961
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 Aug;96(8):1416-2216809604
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-8519577696
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2009 Oct;99(10):1840-819696377
Cites: Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2010 Jan;16(1):68-7620099966
Cites: Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2010 Apr;16(2):123-3420438150
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2004 Jul;65(4):409-1815376814
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2004 Summer;34(2):160-7115191272
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2011 Mar;47(1-2):157-6921052820
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Oct;33(5):1138-4315218015
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):84-9121333035
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2011 Sep;37(5):333-821854275
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2011 Dec;48(3-4):426-3821387118
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Jan;120(1):6-1021890450
Cites: Annu Rev Clin Psychol. 2012;8:131-6022149479
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2012 May;102(5):800-622420786
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Jul;75(2):249-5622575699
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2012 Jul;102(7):1353-6122676500
Cites: J Evid Based Soc Work. 2012;9(4):369-9522830938
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(2):20-5422875471
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2012 Sep;43(3):309-1922898125
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):403-822931073
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):428-3522931077
Cites: Arch Suicide Res. 2012;16(4):273-8623137218
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2013 Apr;81(2):196-20522289132
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2013 May;103(5):822-923488515
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2013 Dec;103(12):2119-2124134371
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;51(1):47-7224097414
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014;14:2424533771
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S336-4224754665
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):125-3924952249
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 1999 Winter;29(4):332-4610636327
Cites: Alcohol Res Health. 2001;25(3):159-6711810953
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 May;93(5):774-812721143
Cites: J Psychoactive Drugs. 2003 Jan-Mar;35(1):15-2512733754
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2003 Sep;27(3):259-8914510095
Cites: Am Psychol. 1990 May;45(5):599-6112190505
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 1994 Fall;24(3):245-557825197
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1998;8(2):56-789842066
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1999 Jun;153(6):573-8010357296
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Jan;62(1):99-10815630077
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2005 Jul;95(7):1238-4415933239
Cites: Crisis. 2005;26(3):141-516276757
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2005 Oct;73(5):819-2916287382
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2006 Jul;7(3):312-2316760238
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 Dec;63(11):2938-4816952416
Cites: J Trauma Stress. 2006 Dec;19(6):937-4717195969
Cites: Death Stud. 2007 May-Jun;31(5):457-7717554839
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2005;12(1):1-2117602391
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2007 Dec;40(3-4):290-30017906926
Cites: Am Psychol. 2008 Jan;63(1):14-3118193978
Cites: J Interpers Violence. 2008 Mar;23(3):316-3818245571
Cites: Health Care Women Int. 2008 Mar;29(3):300-1518350429
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2008 Jun;38(3):311-2018611129
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2008 Jun;38(3):343-5318611133
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2009;16(1):1-2419340763
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2009 Jun;43(3-4):257-6619333751
Cites: Arch Suicide Res. 2006;10(2):177-9016574615
PubMed ID
25790403 View in PubMed
Less detail

American Akicita: Indigenous American warriors and military service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291580
Source
Psychol Serv. 2017 Aug; 14(3):269
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
J Douglas McDonald
Author Affiliation
University of North Dakota.
Source
Psychol Serv. 2017 Aug; 14(3):269
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Culturally Competent Care
Culture
Humans
Indians, North American
Military Personnel
Oceanic Ancestry Group
United States
Abstract
Indigenous Americans (i.e., Native/American Indians, AK natives, Pacific Islanders) have consistently volunteered for military service at greater rates than any other ethnic group, including the majority culture, since the early days of the country. This article is an introduction to the special section which includes a number of outstanding papers that provide an innovative and compelling effort to overcome the challenges of casualties from war and render effective and culturally informed care. These manuscripts describe culturally appropriate considerations of suicide (O'Keefe), family involvement and access to care (Whealin), and telehealth for treatment of rural Native veterans (Goss). Challenging and complex treatment needs call for equally mindful and competent approaches. These authors and providers present compelling examples of addressing these needs in working with our Wounded Warriors. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
28805410 View in PubMed
Less detail

313 records – page 1 of 32.