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Aboriginal urbanization and rights in Canada: examining implications for health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115712
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Laura C Senese
Kathi Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography & Program in Planning, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 5047, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G3, Canada. laura.senese@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Status Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Urban Health - ethnology
Urbanization
Young Adult
Abstract
Urbanization among Indigenous peoples is growing globally. This has implications for the assertion of Indigenous rights in urban areas, as rights are largely tied to land bases that generally lie outside of urban areas. Through their impacts on the broader social determinants of health, the links between Indigenous rights and urbanization may be related to health. Focusing on a Canadian example, this study explores relationships between Indigenous rights and urbanization, and the ways in which they are implicated in the health of urban Indigenous peoples living in Toronto, Canada. In-depth interviews focused on conceptions of and access to Aboriginal rights in the city, and perceived links with health, were conduced with 36 Aboriginal people who had moved to Toronto from a rural/reserve area. Participants conceived of Aboriginal rights largely as the rights to specific services/benefits and to respect for Aboriginal cultures/identities. There was a widespread perception among participants that these rights are not respected in Canada, and that this is heightened when living in an urban area. Disrespect for Aboriginal rights was perceived to negatively impact health by way of social determinants of health (e.g., psychosocial health impacts of discrimination experienced in Toronto). The paper discusses the results in the context of policy implications and future areas of research.
PubMed ID
23474122 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Sep 4;168(36):3008-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-4-2006
Author
Marie L Nørredam
Annette Sonne Nielsen
Allan Krasnik
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Afdeling for Sundhedstjenesteforskning, København K. m.norredam@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Sep 4;168(36):3008-11
Date
Sep-4-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark - epidemiology - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
European Union
Health Services Accessibility
Human Rights
Humans
Morbidity
Mortality
Red Cross
Refugees - psychology
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Abstract
Migrants include a broad category of individuals moving from one place to another, either forced or voluntarily. Ethnicity and migration are interacting concepts which may act as determinants for migrants' health and access to health care. This access to health care may be measured by studying utilisation patterns or clinical outcomes like morbidity and mortality. Migrants' access to health care may be affected by several factors relating to formal and informal barriers. Informal barriers include economic and legal restrictions. Formal barriers include language and psychological and sociocultural factors.
Notes
ReprintIn: Dan Med Bull. 2007 Feb;54(1):48-917349225
PubMed ID
16999890 View in PubMed
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Accommodation and resistance to the dominant cultural discourse on psychiatric mental health: oral history accounts of family members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160232
Source
Nurs Inq. 2007 Dec;14(4):266-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Geertje Boschma
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. geertje.boschma@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Nurs Inq. 2007 Dec;14(4):266-78
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude to Health
Autobiography as Topic
Cultural Characteristics
Family
Historiography
History, 20th Century
Humans
Mental Disorders - history
Mental Health Services - history
Narration - history
Nursing Methodology Research
Psychiatric Nursing - history
Questionnaires
Abstract
Oral history makes a critical contribution in articulating the perspectives of people often overlooked in histories written from the standpoint of dominating class, gender, ethnic or professional groups. Using three interrelated approaches - life stories, oral history, and narrative analysis - this paper analyzes family responses to psychiatric care and mental illness in oral history interviews with family members who experienced mental illness themselves or within their family between 1930 and 1975. Interviews with three family members in Alberta, Canada are the primary focus. These stories provide an important avenue to understand the meaning and transformations of mental health-care from the point of view of families. Family members' stories reveal contradictory responses to the dominant cultural discourse. Using a performative framework of interpretation, the narratives reveal a complex interplay between medical, social and cultural conceptions of mental illness, deepening our understanding of its meaning. The history of mental health-care can be substantially enriched by the analysis of family members' stories, not only revealing the constructed nature of mental illness, but also illustrating the family as a mediating context in which the meaning of mental illness is negotiated.
PubMed ID
18028147 View in PubMed
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Accounting for vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage in pandemic critical care triage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96997
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Chris Kaposy
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. christopher.kaposy@med.mun.ca
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Critical Care
Cultural Characteristics
Disaster Planning - trends
Disease Outbreaks
Health Care Rationing - ethics
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - ethnology - mortality - virology
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - standards
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Patient Selection - ethics
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Social Class
Triage - methods - organization & administration - standards - trends
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In a pandemic situation, resources in intensive care units may be stretched to the breaking point, and critical care triage may become necessary. In such a situation, I argue that a patient's combined vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage should be a justification for giving that patient some priority for critical care. In this article I present an example of a critical care triage protocol that recognizes the moral relevance of vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage, from the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
PubMed ID
20465071 View in PubMed
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Acculturation among circumpolar peoples: implications for health status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239629
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1985;40:21-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985

Acculturation and cancer information preferences of Spanish-speaking immigrant women to Canada: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147531
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria D Thomson
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Questionnaires
Social Change
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the cancer information preferences of immigrant women by their level of acculturation we conducted interviews with 34 Spanish-speaking English-as-a-second-language (ESL) women. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to look for differences by acculturation. Four themes were identified: What is prevention? What should I do; sources of my cancer information, strategies I use to better understand, and identifying and closing my health knowledge gaps. Acculturation did not differentiate immigrant women's cancer information sources, preferences, or strategies used to address language barriers. We suggest the effect of acculturation is neither direct nor simple and may reflect other factors including self-efficacy.
PubMed ID
19894155 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and depressive symptoms in Muslim university students: personal-family acculturation match.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158048
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Yasmin Asvat
Vanessa L Malcarne
Author Affiliation
San Diego State University, CA 92120-4913, USA.
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Conflict (Psychology)
Cultural Characteristics
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Islam - psychology
Male
Mass Screening
Parenting
Religion and Psychology
Social Identification
Social Values
Students - psychology
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationships of personal acculturation and of personal-family acculturation match to depressive symptoms were investigated in a sample of 68 Muslim university students. Two dimensions of personal and family acculturation were assessed: heritage and mainstream culture identification. Participants completed the Vancouver Index of Acculturation (Ryder, Alden, & Paulhus, 2000 ) and the depressive disorder subscale of the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (Zimmerman & Mattia, 1999 ). For personal acculturation, individuals with high personal heritage culture identification reported fewer lifetime (but not past-year) depressive symptoms. In contrast, individuals with high personal mainstream culture identification reported more past-year (but not lifetime) depressive symptoms. The hypothesis that a match between personal and family acculturation orientation would be associated with fewer depressive symptoms was supported for heritage culture identification only. For past-year depression, the two match conditions (low or high personal and family heritage culture identification) were associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than a low personal/high family mismatch but did not differ from a high personal/low family mismatch. For lifetime depression, a high personal/high family match was associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than all other conditions. Findings suggests that, for Muslims, a match of high personal and high family heritage culture identification may act as a protective factor for the experience of depressive symptoms both in the short term (past year) and in the long term (lifetime).
PubMed ID
22023606 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and sexual function in Asian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171478
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Lori A Brotto
Heather M Chik
Andrew G Ryder
Boris B Gorzalka
Brooke N Seal
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics & Gyneacology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Lori.Brotto@vch.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Cultural effects on sexuality are pervasive and potentially of great clinical importance, but have not yet received sustained empirical attention. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of acculturation on sexual permissiveness and sexual function, with a particular focus on arousal in Asian women living in Canada. We also compared questionnaire responses between Asian and Euro-Canadian groups in hopes of investigating whether acculturation captured unique information not predicted by ethnic group affiliation. Euro-Canadian (n = 173) and Asian (n = 176) female university students completed a battery of questionnaires in private. Euro-Canadian women had significantly more sexual knowledge and experiences, more liberal attitudes, and higher rates of desire, arousal, sexual receptivity, and sexual pleasure. Anxiety from anticipated sexual activity was significantly higher in Asian women, but the groups did not differ significantly on relationship satisfaction or problems with sexual function. Acculturation to Western culture, as well as maintained affiliation with traditional Asian heritage, were both significantly and independently related to sexual attitudes above and beyond length of residency in Canada, and beyond ethnic group comparisons. Overall, these data suggest that measurement of acculturation may capture information about an individual's unique acculturation pattern that is not evident when focusing solely on ethnic group comparisons or length of residency, and that such findings may be important in facilitating the assessment, classification, and treatment of sexual difficulties in Asian women.
PubMed ID
16362246 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and sexual function in Canadian East Asian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166675
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lori A Brotto
Jane S T Woo
Andrew G Ryder
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Obstetrics/Gynaecology, Vancouver, BC, Canada. lori.brotto@vch.ca
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of considering acculturation when investigating the sexuality of East Asian women in North America. Moreover, bidimensional assessment of both heritage and mainstream cultural affiliations provides significantly more information about sexual attitudes than simple unidimensional measures, such as length of residency in the Western culture.
The goal of this study was to extend the findings in women to a sample of East Asian men.
Self-report measures of sexual behaviors, sexual responses, and sexual satisfaction.
Euro-Canadian (N = 124) and East Asian (N = 137) male university students privately completed a battery of questionnaires in exchange for course credit. Results. Group comparisons revealed East Asian men to have significantly lower liberal sexual attitudes and experiences, and a significantly lower proportion had engaged in sexual intercourse compared with the Euro-Canadian sample. In addition, the East Asian men had significantly higher Impotence and Avoidance subscale scores on the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction, a measure of sexual dysfunction. Focusing on East Asian men alone, mainstream acculturation, but not length of residency in Canada, was significantly related to sexual attitudes, experiences, and responses.
Overall, these data replicate the findings in women and suggest that specific acculturation effects over and above length of residency should be included in the cultural assessment of men's sexual health.
PubMed ID
17087799 View in PubMed
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Acculturation stress among Maya in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121282
Source
J Cult Divers. 2012;19(2):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Eugenia Millender
Author Affiliation
Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA. emillend@fau.edu
Source
J Cult Divers. 2012;19(2):58-64
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Cultural Characteristics
Cultural Diversity
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Mexico - ethnology
Nursing Research
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Abstract: As health care disparities become more evident in our multicultural nation, culture sensitive health research needs to be a priority in order for good health care to take place. This article will explore the literature related to acculturation stress and mental health disparities among the Mayan population. Literatures of similar but distinct groups are included due to the limited amount of research of the Mayan population. Using Leiniger's Transcultural nursing theory, these findings suggest that nurses have a large gap to fill to address the mental health disparities of specific cultural groups like the indigenous Maya, thereby satisfying their nursing obligations.
PubMed ID
22924204 View in PubMed
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805 records – page 1 of 81.