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809 records – page 1 of 81.

Source
Health Care Women Int. 1990;11(4):v-vi
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
P N Stern
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1990;11(4):v-vi
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark
Humans
Women - psychology
PubMed ID
2228809 View in PubMed
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[Widen the time perspective in the debate on euthanasia! What's the opinion of the clinically active?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208193
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jun 11;94(24):2252-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-11-1997
Author
A. Hallén
G. Häggblom
Author Affiliation
Medicinska kliniken, Säffle sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jun 11;94(24):2252-3
Date
Jun-11-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Characteristics
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia
Humans
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1997 Aug 20;94(34):28029303986
PubMed ID
9213694 View in PubMed
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Nursing, Indigenous peoples and cultural safety: so what? Now what?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167141
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2006 Sep;22(2):327-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Madeleine Dion Stout
Bernice Downey
Author Affiliation
Aboriginal Nurses Association of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2006 Sep;22(2):327-32
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Characteristics
Humans
Nursing
Population Groups
Safety
PubMed ID
17026439 View in PubMed
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The influence of climatocultural background on outdoor thermal perception.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296004
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2018 Oct; 62(10):1873-1886
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Dmitry Brychkov
Yaakov Garb
David Pearlmutter
Author Affiliation
J.E. Cairnes School of Business & Economics National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2018 Oct; 62(10):1873-1886
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cultural Characteristics
Europe
Humans
Israel
Russia
Thermosensing
Turkey
Abstract
This study examines the extent to which people with different past thermal experience and "climatocultural" history systematically report different outdoor thermal sensations and thermal comfort patterns. After constructing two distinct climatocultural groups co-inhabiting the research setting (native Israelis vs. representatives of colder regions), and comparing their relative thermal preferences in both short-term and long-term observational experiments, we confirmed the existence of a strong correlation between affiliation to a certain climatocultural group and outdoor thermal sensation. It was shown that the degree of this correlation was not a constant value, and the strength of the difference in thermal sensation between different groups might change subject to different environmental conditions and possibly expectations. Under some environmental conditions, i.e., stressful but not extreme, the differences may be accentuated, while under others, i.e., either comfortable or extremely stressful, the scope of difference may diminish. Short-term acclimation may to some extent offset the differences between separate climatocultural groups. The study also showed that the meaning of the thermal comfort scale itself may be perceived unevenly between representatives of different groups.
Notes
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 2016 Dec;60(12):1849-1861 PMID 27192997
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 2014 Dec;58(10):2111-27 PMID 24648148
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 2014 Mar;58(2):277-308 PMID 24550042
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 2015 Oct;59(10):1347-62 PMID 25527044
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 2006 May;50(5):258-68 PMID 16541241
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 2017 Jan;61(1):69-85 PMID 27259949
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 1981 Jun;25(2):109-22 PMID 7019105
Cites: Indoor Air. 2008 Jun;18(3):182-201 PMID 18363685
PubMed ID
30073410 View in PubMed
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[Loneliness among the elderly in Spain and Sweden: context and culture].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143901
Source
Rev Esp Geriatr Gerontol. 2010 Jul-Aug;45(4):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Author
Elena Del Barrio
Penélope Castejón
Mayte Sancho Castiello
María Angeles Tortosa
Gerdt Sundström
Bo Malmberg
Author Affiliation
Instituto Gerontológico Matia (INGEMA), Madrid, Spain.
Source
Rev Esp Geriatr Gerontol. 2010 Jul-Aug;45(4):189-95
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cultural Characteristics
Family Characteristics
Humans
Loneliness
Spain
Sweden
Abstract
Older people in Spain and other Southern European countries are reported to feel lonelier than the older people in the North of Europe. Data from the 1970s and onwards consistently show this. The present study explores feelings of loneliness as a product of both cultural and situational determining factors, by comparing survey data for Spain and Sweden.
Data derived from several national surveys of the older people in Spain and Sweden with questions about loneliness. For closer analysis we use the Spanish 2006 Encuesta de Condiciones de Vida (Living conditions Questionnaire), and the Swedish 2002-2003 Survey of Living Conditions.
On average, 24% of older people in Spain and 10% of elderly Swedish people expressed sentiments of loneliness in the surveys used here (2006 and 2002-03 respectively). Living arrangements and perceived health are related with factors of loneliness in both countries, although levels differ. For example, people in good health who live alone are five times more likely to feel lonely in Spain (45%) than in Sweden (9%) and two-three times more likely when living alone in poor health (82% and 32% respectively). People in good health who live with their spouse/partner only are equally unlikely in both Spain and Sweden to express loneliness (4-5%). It often seems--when it occurs--to be due to caring for a spouse/partner, or problems in the relationship.
Results highlight the importance of contextual features--health and living arrangements--and cultural expectations in interpreting reported loneliness.
PubMed ID
20430479 View in PubMed
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Introducing a standard of legal insanity: The case of Sweden compared to The Netherlands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270651
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2015 May-Jun;40:43-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Susanna Radovic
Gerben Meynen
Tova Bennet
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2015 May-Jun;40:43-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Criminal Law
Cultural Characteristics
Humans
Insanity Defense
Netherlands
Sweden
Abstract
A recent governmental report has suggested that the notion of insanity, which has not been a relevant concept in Swedish criminal law for the last 50years, should be reintroduced into the criminal justice system. This move has generated a debate over the most appropriate criteria to be included in a legal standard for insanity. We consider the fundamental question of whether a legal standard is required when introducing insanity, by looking at a legal system in which legal insanity is available but where no standard is used: The Netherlands. Overall, a review of advantages and disadvantages leads to the conclusion that such a standard is necessary. What exactly should that standard be? Is the development of different "grades" of insanity desirable? Legal considerations concerning what is essentially a legal notion should predominate in making these determinations-informed by psychiatric and other relevant scientific findings.
PubMed ID
26003234 View in PubMed
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Critical cultural perspectives and health care involving Aboriginal peoples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167148
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2006 Sep;22(2):155-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Annette J Browne
Colleen Varcoe
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Vancouver BC, Canada.
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2006 Sep;22(2):155-67
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Characteristics
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Population Groups
Abstract
Despite a growing body of critical scholarship in nursing, the concept of culture continues to be applied in ways that diminish the significance of power relations and structural constraints on health and health care. In this paper, we take a critical look at how assumptions and ideas underpinning conceptualizations of culture and cultural sensitivity can influence nurses' perceptions of Aboriginal peoples and Aboriginal health. Drawing on examples from our research, we examine how popularized assumptions about culture can shape nurses' views of Aboriginal patients. These assumptions and perceptions require closer scrutiny because of their potential to influence nurses' practice with Aboriginal patients. Our specific aims are to: (a) consider some of the limitations of cultural sensitivity in relation to health care involving Aboriginal peoples; (b) explore how ideas about culture have the potential to become problematic in nursing practice with Aboriginal peoples; and (c) explore the relevance of a 'critical cultural approach' in extending our understanding of culture in relation to Aboriginal peoples' health. We discuss a critical cultural perspective as one way of broadening nurses' understandings about the complexities of culture and the many facets of culture that require critical consideration. In relation to Aboriginal health, this will require nurses to develop greater critical awareness of culture as a relational process, and as necessarily influenced by issues of racism, colonialism, historical circumstances, and the current political climate in which we live.
PubMed ID
17026422 View in PubMed
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What do expressions with north and northern people tell us?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4802
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2002 Feb;61(1):61-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Irma Sorvali
Author Affiliation
Department of German, French and Scandinavian Languages, University or Oulu, Finland. Irma.Sorvali@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2002 Feb;61(1):61-9
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Communication
Cultural Characteristics
Food Packaging
Humans
Linguistics
Scandinavia
Abstract
The aim of this article is to study linguistic expressions which include the words North and Northern people. This is done by philological and linguistic analysis of the material, which consists of different types of written documents dating from different historical periods. The oldest historical documents were produced by the Ancient Roman writers, who wrote about wild tribes living in the North. The expression "the evil from the North" in the Bible is also used by the Fathers of the Church, when describing the Great Migrations. The most recent material consists of academic texts-dealing with the Northern dimension--and everyday texts--in this case, mostly of bread packages--referring among other things to people's nutrition and health. Expressions referring to the North are also present in modern material, but the negative association of the older documents is not so present. All the texts, both historical and modern, are discussed as a whole from Finnish and Scandinavian points of view. Semiotic aspects are highlighted by the use of some visual illustrations from the different texts in point.
PubMed ID
12002949 View in PubMed
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Ethics of research in Native communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300648
Source
Canadian Family Physician. 1994 Nov;40:1888-90, 1894-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
Macaulay, A.C.
Source
Canadian Family Physician. 1994 Nov;40:1888-90, 1894-7
Date
1994
Language
English
French
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Characteristics
Ethics, Medical
Human
Indians of North America
Research
Less detail

Understanding health and illness: Research at the interface between science and indigenous knowledge

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76462
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Oct;33(5):1138-43. Epub 2004 Jun 24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
  1 website  
Author
Durie, M
Author Affiliation
Te Putahi a Toi, School of Maori Studies, Massey University, New Zealand. m.h.durie@massey.ac.nz
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Oct;33(5):1138-43. Epub 2004 Jun 24
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aging
Cultural Characteristics
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Research design.
Traditional medicine
Abstract
Indigenous knowledge cannot be verified by scientific criteria nor can science be adequately assessed according to the tenets of indigenous knowledge. Each is built on distinctive philosophies, methodologies, and criteria. While there is considerable debate around their relative merits, contests about the validities of the two systems tend to serve as distractions from explorations of the interface, and the subsequent opportunities for creating new knowledge that reflects the dual persuasions. Maori researchers in Aotearoa/New Zealand have been able to apply the methods and values of both systems in order to reach more comprehensive understandings of health and illness. Two case studies are used to demonstrate how the incorporation of indigenous beliefs into research protocols and measurements can enhance health research and understandings of health and illness.
Notes
Alaska Medical Library carries this title.
Online Resources
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809 records – page 1 of 81.