Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 2.

Cryptosporidium and cryptosporidiosis in Denmark--current status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172259
Source
Parassitologia. 2005 Jun;47(2):193-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
H L Enemark
R B Langkjaer
H. Vigre
C. Maddox-Hyttel
J S Andersen
R F Petersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Diagnostics and Research, Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research, Bülowsvej 27, DK-1 790 Copenhagen V, Denmark. hle@dfvf.dk
Source
Parassitologia. 2005 Jun;47(2):193-8
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Diseases - parasitology
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - parasitology - prevention & control - veterinary
Cryptosporidium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Protozoan - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Diarrhea - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Female
Forecasting
Genotype
Humans
Male
Mammals - parasitology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Occupational Exposure
Prevalence
Species Specificity
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Zoonoses
Abstract
The genus Cryptosporidium comprises a group of protozoan parasites that infect a broad variety of vertebrates causing severe diarrhoeal illness in immunocompromised as well as immunocompetent hosts. Although molecular heterogeneity of the genus is being increasingly recognised, traditional diagnostic methods do not discriminate all species/subtypes, and population genetic studies of these parasites, using discriminatory molecular markers, have only been published recently. In Denmark, Cryptosporidium research has focussed mainly on detection methods, pathogenicity and veterinary aspects. The present paper gives an overview of recent and ongoing Cryptosporidium research in Denmark with an emphasis on molecular approaches to study epidemiology and transmission.
PubMed ID
16252473 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cryptosporidium and Giardia in marine-foraging river otters (Lontra canadensis) from the Puget Sound Georgia Basin ecosystem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164131
Source
J Parasitol. 2007 Feb;93(1):198-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
J K Gaydos
W A Miller
K V K Gilardi
A. Melli
H. Schwantje
C. Engelstoft
H. Fritz
P A Conrad
Author Affiliation
Orcas Island Office, University of California-Davis Wildlife Health Center, 1016 Deer Harbor Road, Eastsound, Washington 98245, USA. jkgaydos@ucdavis.edu
Source
J Parasitol. 2007 Feb;93(1):198-202
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Cryptosporidium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Ecosystem
Feces - parasitology
Genotype
Giardia - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Giardiasis - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Humans
Otters - parasitology
Risk factors
Washington - epidemiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
Species of Cryptosporidium and Giardia can infect humans and wildlife and have the potential to be transmitted between these 2 groups; yet, very little is known about these protozoans in marine wildlife. Feces of river otters (Lontra canadensis), a common marine wildlife species in the Puget Sound Georgia Basin, were examined for species of Cryptosporidium and Giardia to determine their role in the epidemiology of these pathogens. Using ZnSO4 flotation and immunomagnetic separation, followed by direct immunofluorescent antibody detection (IMS/DFA), we identified Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts in 9 fecal samples from 6 locations and Giardia sp. cysts in 11 fecal samples from 7 locations. The putative risk factors of proximate human population and degree of anthropogenic shoreline modification were not associated with the detection of Cryptosporidium or Giardia spp. in river otter feces. Amplification of DNA from the IMS/DFA slide scrapings was successful for 1 sample containing > 500 Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts. Sequences from the Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA and the COWP loci were most similar to the ferret Cryptosporidium sp. genotype. River otters could serve as reservoirs for Cryptosporidium and Giardia species in marine ecosystems. More work is needed to better understand the zoonotic potential of the genotypes they carry as well as their implications for river otter health.
PubMed ID
17436965 View in PubMed
Less detail

Detection and characterization of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. on swine farms in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133696
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2011 Nov;8(11):1207-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Abdolvahab Farzan
Lorna Parrington
Tatjana Coklin
Angela Cook
Katarina Pintar
Frank Pollari
Robert Friendship
Jeffrey Farber
Brent Dixon
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada. afarzan@uoguelph.ca
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2011 Nov;8(11):1207-13
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Confidence Intervals
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission - veterinary
Cryptosporidium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Protozoan - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Feces - parasitology
Female
Genotype
Giardia lamblia - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Giardiasis - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission - veterinary
HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins - genetics
Humans
Manure - parasitology
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Protozoan Proteins - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Zoonoses
Abstract
As part of the C-EnterNet surveillance program of the Public Health Agency of Canada, 122 pooled swine manure samples from 10 farms in Ontario, Canada were collected and tested for Giardia and Cryptosporidium. Giardia duodenalis cysts and Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected using immunofluorescence microscopy. Nested-polymerase chain reaction protocols were performed to amplify the small subunit rRNA gene and the ?-giardin gene for G. duodenalis, and the small subunit rRNA gene and the heat shock protein-70 gene for Cryptosporidium spp. The DNA amplicons were sequenced to determine genotypes and species. A mixed multivariable method was used to compare the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in different stages of production. Both Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts were present on all tested farms, with 50.8% of the samples positive for G. duodenalis and 44.3% positive for Cryptosporidium spp. by microscopy, and 66.4% and 55.7%, respectively, positive by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). No significant agreement was observed between microscopy and PCR method to detect Giardia and Cryptosporidium (p0.05), however, it was less frequent (odds ratio, OR=0.21 [0.07, 0.63]) among sows. Cryptosporidium was more likely (OR=3.6 [1.3, 9.9]) to be detected in manure pits and weaners (OR=3.3 [1.1, 10.0]) compared to finisher pigs, and it was less frequent (OR=0.06 [0.007, 0.55]) in sows than in finishers (p
PubMed ID
21675863 View in PubMed
Less detail

Epidemiology of anthroponotic and zoonotic human cryptosporidiosis in England and Wales, 2004-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142264
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2011 May;139(5):700-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
R M Chalmers
R. Smith
K. Elwin
F A Clifton-Hadley
M. Giles
Author Affiliation
Cryptosporidium Reference Unit, Public Health Wales Microbiology ABM, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, UK. Rachel.chalmers@wales.nhs.uk
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2011 May;139(5):700-12
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology
Cryptosporidium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Protozoan - chemistry - genetics
Diarrhea - epidemiology - parasitology
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Wales - epidemiology
Young Adult
Zoonoses - epidemiology
Abstract
In order to monitor epidemiological trends, Cryptosporidium-positive samples (n=4509) from diarrhoeic patients were typed. Compared to the previous 4 years, the proportion of Cryptosporidium hominis cases in 2004-2006 increased to 57·3%, while 38·5% were C. parvum. The remaining 4·2% cases included mixed C. parvum and C. hominis infections, C. meleagridis, C. felis, C. ubiquitum and a novel genotype. When the typing results were combined with enhanced surveillance data to monitor risk exposures, C. hominis was linked to urban dwelling, previous diarrhoea in the household, any travel especially abroad, and using a swimming or paddling pool. C. parvum was linked to having a private water supply, contact with surface water, visiting or living on a farm, and contact with farm animal faeces. The proportion of laboratory-confirmed indigenous cases acquired from direct contact with farm animals was estimated to be 25% for C. parvum and 10% of all reported Cryptosporidium cases.
PubMed ID
20619076 View in PubMed
Less detail

Molecular and phylogenetic characterization of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from pigs and cattle in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80009
Source
Parasitology. 2007 Mar;134(Pt 3):339-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Langkjaer R B
Vigre H.
Enemark H L
Maddox-Hyttel C.
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Diagnostics and Research, Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research, Bülowsvej 27, DK-1790 Copenhagen V, Denmark.
Source
Parasitology. 2007 Mar;134(Pt 3):339-50
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Animals
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Cryptosporidium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Protozoan - analysis
DNA, Ribosomal - analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Genotype
Giardia - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Giardiasis - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Prevalence
Protozoan Proteins - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
The genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis from dairy cattle and pigs in Denmark was determined in the present study. Faecal samples from 1237 pigs and 1150 cattle originating from 50 sow herds and 50 dairy herds, respectively, were analysed for the presence of the two parasites by immunofluorescence microscopy. A large proportion of the (oo)cyst containing samples were selected for molecular characterization. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rDNA locus and/or the HSP70 gene of 183 pig and 154 cattle isolates of Cryptosporidium revealed the presence of C. suis, pig genotype II, C. parvum (cattle genotype), C. bovis, Cryptosporidium deer-like genotype and a novel C. suis-like genotype. For both cattle and pigs, a host age-related change in distribution of species/genotypes was observed. The zoonotic C. parvum (cattle genotype) was most prevalent in young calves. For Giardia, 82 and 145 isolates from pigs and cattle, respectively, were analysed at the 18S rDNA locus and/or the gdh gene. Giardia isolates belonging to the zoonotic Assemblage A was found in both young and older calves, as well as in weaners and piglets, whereas cows seemed to be infected purely by isolates of the livestock group, Assemblage E.
PubMed ID
17076923 View in PubMed
Less detail

Molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium isolates from Swedish dairy cattle in relation to age, diarrhoea and region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98127
Source
Vet Parasitol. 2010 May 11;169(3-4):289-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-11-2010
Author
Charlotte Silverlås
Katarina Näslund
Camilla Björkman
Jens G Mattsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Ruminant Medicine and Veterinary Epidemiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7054, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. charlotte.silverlas@kv.slu.se
Source
Vet Parasitol. 2010 May 11;169(3-4):289-95
Date
May-11-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Base Sequence
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Cryptosporidium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Dairying
Diarrhea - epidemiology - veterinary
Molecular Sequence Data
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Cryptosporidium positive samples from 176 preweaned calves, young stock and cows of 48 herds were subjected to molecular characterisation of the 18S rRNA gene to determine which species are present in Swedish dairy cattle. In addition, samples characterised as Cryptosporidium parvum were further analysed at the GP60 gene to investigate distribution and zoonotic potential of subtypes. The 18S rRNA gene was successfully sequenced in 110 samples, with Cryptosporidium bovis in 83, C. parvum in 15, Cryptosporidium ryanae in 10, and Cryptosporidium andersoni in two samples. C. bovis was the most common species, being identified in 74% of calf samples, in 77% of young stock samples and in 100% of cow samples. The youngest calves infected with C. bovis were 7 days old, showing that the prepatent period is shorter than the previously stated 10 days. C. parvum was detected in 15 calves from nine farms, and samples were clustered in the southern parts of Sweden. Diarrhoeic calf samples contained C. parvum, C. bovis or C. ryanae. Sequencing of the GP60 gene was successful in 13 of the C. parvum samples. Eight subtypes, including three novel ones, were detected. Four of the subtypes have previously been identified in humans. This indicates that there is a zoonotic potential in C. parvum infected Swedish dairy calves.
PubMed ID
20138705 View in PubMed
Less detail

Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium sp. isolated from northern Alaskan caribou (Rangifer tarandus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189858
Source
J Parasitol. 2002 Feb;88(1):213-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
C. Siefker
L G Rickard
G T Pharr
J S Simmons
T M O'Hara
Author Affiliation
College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State 39762, USA. siefker@cvm.msstate.edu
Source
J Parasitol. 2002 Feb;88(1):213-6
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Base Sequence
Cattle
Cryptosporidiosis - parasitology - veterinary
Cryptosporidium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Protozoan - analysis - genetics
Dogs
Heat-Shock Proteins - genetics
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Reindeer - parasitology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Cryptosporidium sp. was found in 3 out of 49 caribou (Rangifer tarandus) from northern Alaska. Segments of both the 18S ribosomal RNA and the heat shock protein genes were amplified from the caribou isolate and compared with that obtained from an isolate from a wild white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Virginia as well as other species and isolates available from GenBank. Analyses showed the white-tailed deer isolate to be identical with the C. parvum cattle genotype; however, the caribou isolate represents a new genotype closely related to C. serpentis, C. muris, and C. andersoni. Giardia sp. was not detected in any of the caribou samples nor was Cryptosporidium sp. or Giardia sp. detected in any of the 42 moose (Alces alces) samples examined.
PubMed ID
12053974 View in PubMed
Less detail

Molecular epidemiology and clinical manifestations of human cryptosporidiosis in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121791
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2013 May;141(5):1009-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
M. Insulander
C. Silverlås
M. Lebbad
L. Karlsson
J G Mattsson
B. Svenungsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Stockholm County, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2013 May;141(5):1009-20
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - parasitology - pathology
Cryptosporidium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Diarrhea - epidemiology - parasitology
Disease Outbreaks
Family
Female
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology
Species Specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study describes the epidemiology and symptoms in 271 cryptosporidiosis patients in Stockholm County, Sweden. Species/genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and 18S rRNA genes. Species were C. parvum (n=111), C. hominis (n=65), C. meleagridis (n=11), C. felis (n=2), Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype 1 (n=2), and a recently described species, C. viatorum (n=2). Analysis of the Gp60 gene revealed five C. hominis allele families (Ia, Ib, Id, Ie, If), and four C. parvum allele families (IIa, IIc, IId, IIe). Most C. parvum cases (51%) were infected in Sweden, as opposed to C. hominis cases (26%). Clinical manifestations differed slightly by species. Diarrhoea lasted longer in C. parvum cases compared to C. hominis and C. meleagridis cases. At follow-up 25-36 months after disease onset, 15% of the patients still reported intermittent diarrhoea. In four outbreaks and 13 family clusters, a single subtype was identified, indicating a common infection source, which emphasizes the value of genotyping for epidemiological investigations.
PubMed ID
22877562 View in PubMed
Less detail

Spatiotemporal analysis of Cryptosporidium species/genotypes and relationships with other zoonotic pathogens in surface water from mixed-use watersheds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119216
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 Jan;79(2):434-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Graham Wilkes
Norma J Ruecker
Norman F Neumann
Victor P J Gannon
Cassandra Jokinen
Mark Sunohara
Edward Topp
Katarina D M Pintar
Thomas A Edge
David R Lapen
Author Affiliation
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 Jan;79(2):434-48
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild - parasitology
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - transmission
Cryptosporidium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Giardia - isolation & purification
Humans
Ontario
Parasite Load
Phylogeography
Risk assessment
Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Time Factors
Water - parasitology
Abstract
Nearly 690 raw surface water samples were collected during a 6-year period from multiple watersheds in the South Nation River basin, Ontario, Canada. Cryptosporidium oocysts in water samples were enumerated, sequenced, and genotyped by detailed phylogenetic analysis. The resulting species and genotypes were assigned to broad, known host and human infection risk classes. Wildlife/unknown, livestock, avian, and human host classes occurred in 21, 13, 3, and
Notes
Cites: Environ Res. 2000 Feb;82(2):106-1210662525
Cites: J Environ Qual. 2012 Jan-Feb;41(1):21-3022218170
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2000 Aug 15;189(2):189-9410930736
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2001 Aug;127(1):147-5511561967
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2002 Feb;68(2):569-7511823192
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Mar;8(3):263-811927023
Cites: J Eukaryot Microbiol. 2002 Nov-Dec;49(6):433-4012503676
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2003 Jan 21;218(1):203-912583919
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1991 Sep;57(9):2610-61822675
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1996 Aug;62(8):2798-8058702272
Cites: Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2004 Fall;4(3):177-8915631061
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2005 Aug;71(8):4446-5416085835
Cites: J Med Microbiol. 2006 Jun;55(Pt 6):703-716687587
Cites: Parasitol Res. 2006 Sep;99(4):346-5216565813
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2007 Jan;13(1):82-817370519
Cites: Vet Parasitol. 2007 Jun 20;147(1-2):176-8417466459
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2007 Apr;13(4):623-517553283
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2007 Jun;73(12):3945-5717483276
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2012 Apr;140(4):673-8321733255
Cites: J Environ Qual. 2012 Jul-Aug;41(4):1301-1422751075
Cites: Water Res. 2012 Oct 15;46(16):5135-5022841595
Cites: J Water Health. 2007;5 Suppl 1:107-1817890840
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2007 Oct;73(20):6475-8317720824
Cites: J Water Health. 2008 Jun;6(2):263-7318209288
Cites: Water Res. 2009 May;43(8):2209-2319339033
Cites: Risk Anal. 2010 Jan;30(1):49-6420002891
Cites: Exp Parasitol. 2010 Jan;124(1):80-919358845
Cites: Exp Parasitol. 2010 Jan;124(1):138-4619545516
Cites: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2010 Aug;29(8):927-3520521158
Cites: Water Res. 2011 Jan;45(3):1247-5720971491
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2011 May;139(5):700-1220619076
Cites: J Microbiol Methods. 2011 Oct;87(1):82-821807034
Cites: Water Res. 2011 Nov 15;45(18):5807-2521889781
Cites: Water Res. 2011 Dec 15;45(20):6603-1422048017
Cites: Environ Res. 2000 Mar;82(3):263-7110702335
PubMed ID
23124241 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sporadic human cryptosporidiosis caused by Cryptosporidium cuniculus, United Kingdom, 2007-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136296
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2011 Mar;17(3):536-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Rachel M Chalmers
Kristin Elwin
Stephen J Hadfield
Guy Robinson
Author Affiliation
Public Health Wales Microbiology-Singleton Hospital, Swansea, UK. rachel.chalmers@wales.nhs.uk
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2011 Mar;17(3):536-8
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - parasitology
Cryptosporidium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Protozoan - analysis - genetics
Diarrhea - epidemiology - parasitology
Feces - parasitology
Female
Genotype
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Prevalence
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate sporadic human cryptosporidiosis trends in the United Kingdom, we tested 3,030 Cryptosporidium spp.-positive fecal samples, submitted for routine typing in 2007-2008, for C. cuniculus. C. cuniculus prevalence was 1.2%; cases were mostly indigenous and occurred across all age groups. Most occurred during August-October and may be linked to exposure opportunities.
Notes
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Nov;14(11):1800-218976577
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2009 Jan 15;14(2). pii: 1908619161717
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2009 May;15(5):829-3019402985
Cites: Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Dec;57(7-8):e1-1320042061
Cites: Infect Genet Evol. 2010 Dec;10(8):1179-8720691809
Cites: Int J Parasitol. 2010 Nov;40(13):1539-4820600069
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2010 Sep;48(9):3263-620610678
PubMed ID
21392453 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.