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105 records – page 1 of 11.

The Aleut dentition: a correlative study of dental characteristics in an Eskimoid people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1762
Source
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA. 196 pp.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1957
Author
Moorrees, C.F.A.
Author Affiliation
Harvard University
Source
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA. 196 pp.
Date
1957
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Diet, traditional
Dental morphology
Tooth loss
Tooth emergence
Dental caries
Dental occlusal wear
Periodontal disease
Tooth, supernumerary
Dental crowding
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2610.
UAA/APU Consortium, Alaskana Collection GN209.M6 1957
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 1123.
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[An open dialogue about Roskilde Festival 2000].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193135
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Sep 10;163(37):5045-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-2001
Author
A B Horn
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Sep 10;163(37):5045-6
Date
Sep-10-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Crowding
Denmark
Disaster planning
Disasters
Holidays
Humans
Music
Physician's Role
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Aug 6;163(32):421511510244
PubMed ID
11573386 View in PubMed
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Application of Lean Six Sigma for patients presenting with ST-elevation myocardial infarction: the Hamilton Health Sciences experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170153
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):56-61, 2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Ayad Aldarrab
Author Affiliation
Royal College Residency Training Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. Edarrab@hotmail.com
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):56-61, 2
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking
Crowding
Electric Countershock - utilization
Electrocardiography - utilization
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards - utilization
Humans
Institutional Management Teams
Models, organizational
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy
Ontario
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Software Design
Thrombolytic Therapy - utilization
Time Factors
Abstract
Most patients with symptomatic acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the leading cause of death in western industrialized nations, use the emergency department (ED) as their point of entry. Yet, one identified barrier to early recognition of patients with AMI is ED overcrowding. In this paper, the author presents a quality improvement model that applies Lean Six Sigma guidelines to the clinical setting.
Notes
Erratum In: Healthc Q. 2006;9(2):16
PubMed ID
16548435 View in PubMed
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Associations between childhood living circumstances and schizophrenia: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192417
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2001 Nov;104(5):356-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
K. Wahlbeck
C. Osmond
T. Forsén
D J Barker
J G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Lappviksvägen, PO Box 320, FIN-00029 HUCH Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2001 Nov;104(5):356-60
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Causality
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Crowding - psychology
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - etiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
It has been suggested that household crowding may constitute an environmental risk factor for schizophrenia. The present population-based cohort study explores the associations of childhood family size and living conditions to schizophrenia.
The cohort comprised people born at Helsinki University Central Hospital from 1924 to 1933, who went to school in the city and were still living in Finland in 1971. Prospectively gathered data from birth and school health records of these 7086 individuals were collected and linked to the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register.
Ninety-eight cases of schizophrenia were identified in the cohort. Number of siblings at school start was significantly associated with schizophrenia when adjusted for sex and age of mother. Number of siblings was negatively correlated with body mass index at age 7. Childhood household crowding, defined as number of people per room, and total number of rooms in household were not significantly associated with schizophrenia.
Our study indicates that the total number siblings in household during childhood is of greater importance than childhood number of inhabitants per room. Subjects who originated from families with many children had been leaner, which may imply that childhood nutritional factors partly is the mediating factor between number of siblings and schizophrenia. Other possible underlying mechanisms of the associations found include infectious and psychological factors.
PubMed ID
11722316 View in PubMed
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Barriers to patient care in southwestern Ontario rural emergency departments: physician perceptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123081
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2012;17(3):87-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Kyle William Carter
Kelsey Cassidy
Munsif Bhimani
Author Affiliation
Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London Ont., Canada. kcarter2011@meds.uwo.ca
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2012;17(3):87-91
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Crowding
Data Collection
Emergency Service, Hospital - manpower
Health Services Accessibility
Hospitals, Rural - manpower
Humans
Ontario
Patient Care - standards
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Physician Executives - psychology
Physicians - psychology
Waiting Lists
Abstract
We sought to determine the perceptions of physicians staffing rural emergency departments (EDs) in southwestern Ontario with respect to factors affecting patient care in the domains of physical resources, available support and education.
A confidential 30-item survey was distributed through ED chiefs to physicians working in rural EDs in southwestern Ontario. Using a 5-point Likert scale, physicians were asked to rate their perception of factors that affect patient care in their ED. Demographic and practice characteristics were collected to accurately represent the participating centres and physicians.
Twenty-seven of the 164 surveys distributed were completed (16% response rate). Responses were received from 13 (81.3%) of the 16 surveyed EDs. Most of the respondents (78%) held CCFP (Certificant of the College of Family Physicians) credentials, with no additional emergency medicine training. Crowding from inpatient boarding, and inadequate physician staffing or coverage in EDs were identified as having a negative impact on patient care. Information sharing within the hospital, access to emergent laboratory studies and physician access to medications in the ED were identified as having the greatest positive impact on patient care. Respondents viewed all questions in the domain of education as either positive or neutral.
Our survey results reveal that physicians practising emergency medicine in southwestern Ontario perceive crowding as the greatest barrier to providing patient care. Conversely, the survey identified that rural ED physicians perceive information sharing within the hospital, the availability of emergent laboratory studies and access to medications within the ED as having a strongly positive impact on patient care. Interestingly, our findings suggest that physicians in rural EDs view their access to education as adequate, as responses were either positive or neutral in regard to access to training and ability to maintain relevant skills.
PubMed ID
22735084 View in PubMed
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British Columbia's pay-for-performance experiment: part of the solution to reduce emergency department crowding?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106231
Source
Health Policy. 2013 Nov;113(1-2):86-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Amy H Y Cheng
Jason M Sutherland
Author Affiliation
Royal Columbian Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of British Columbia, 330 E Columbia Street, New Westminster, BC V3L 3W7, Canada. Electronic address: amyhycheng@gmail.com.
Source
Health Policy. 2013 Nov;113(1-2):86-92
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Crowding
Efficiency, Organizational
Emergency Service, Hospital - economics - utilization
Humans
Length of Stay - economics - statistics & numerical data
Reimbursement, Incentive
Abstract
Emergency department (ED) overcrowding continues to be a well-publicized problem in a number of countries. In British Columbia, a province in Canada, an ED pay-for-performance (ED P4P) program was initiated in 2007 to create financial incentives for hospitals to reduce patients' ED length of stay (ED LOS). This study's objectives are to determine if the ED P4P program is associated with decreases in ED LOS, and to address the ED P4P program's limitations.
We analyze monthly hospital-level ED LOS time data since the inception of the financial incentives. Since the ED P4P program was phased in at different hospitals from different health authorities over time, hospitals' data from only two regional health authorities are included in the study.
We find association between the implementation of ED P4P and ED LOS time data. However, due to the lack of control data, the findings cannot demonstrate causality. Furthermore, our findings are from hospitals in the greater Vancouver area only.
BC's ED P4P was introduced to create incentives for hospitals to reduce ED LOS by providing incremental incentive funding. Available data indicate that the ED P4P program is associated with mixed successes in reducing ED LOS among participating hospitals.
PubMed ID
24216028 View in PubMed
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Burrows of wild and albino rats: effects of domestication, outdoor raising, age, experience, and maternal state.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66110
Source
J Comp Physiol Psychol. 1977 Jun;91(3):649-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1977
Author
R. Boice
Source
J Comp Physiol Psychol. 1977 Jun;91(3):649-61
Date
Jun-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aggression
Animals
Behavior, Animal
Climate
Comparative Study
Crowding
Environment
Female
Genetics, Behavioral
Humans
Male
Nesting Behavior
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Animal
Rats
Sex Factors
Social Isolation
Species Specificity
Abstract
Burrows dug by albino rats were compared with those of wild Norway rats in an outdoor pen and in observation chambers in the laboratory. Burrows, in terms of measurements, configurations, or sequential development, were indistinguishable in wild and domestic rats. Burrowing for both wild and domestic rats was unaffected by raising in outdoor burrows, by availability of nesting material, or by pregnancy. Prior experience in burrowing did make it more efficient in a second trial, which suggests that learning may have a limited role in what appears to be a behavior with a strong genetic basis. Feralization of domestic rats in the outdoor pen was especially productive in answering claims of degeneracy in these animals: Albino rats were hardy throughout climatic extremes, they maintained a stable population for two years, they constructed and lived in burrows, and they showed a vaiety of wild-type behaviors.
PubMed ID
559696 View in PubMed
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Capacity-related interfacility patient transports: patients affected, wait times involved and associated morbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164969
Source
CJEM. 2006 Jul;8(4):262-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Esther Stolte
Rod Iwanow
Christine Hall
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, ON.
Source
CJEM. 2006 Jul;8(4):262-8
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Crowding
Decision Making
Emergency Service, Hospital
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medical Audit
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Patient Transfer - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
The trend toward operating Canadian hospitals at full capacity necessitates in some settings the transfer of patients from one hospital's emergency department (ED) to another hospital for admission, due to lack of bed availability at the first hospital. Our objectives were to determine how many and which patients are transported, to measure how much time is spent in the peri-transport process and to document any morbidity or mortality associated with these periods of transitional care.
In this retrospective, observational health records review, we obtained health records during February, June and October 2002 for patients evaluated in any 1 of 3 adult EDs from a single Canadian city and subsequently transferred for admission to 1 of the other 2 hospitals. Data included the reason for transport, admitting service, transport process times and administration of key medications (asthma, cardiac, diabetes, analgesic or antibiotics).
Five hundred and thirteen records of transported patients were reviewed, and 507 were evaluated. Of those, 372 (73.4%) transfers were capacity-related and 135 (26.6%) were transferred for specialty services. Of the capacity transports, 219 (58.9%) were admissions for psychiatry and 123 (33.1%) for medicine. Median wait time at the first hospital was 6.7 hours, being longest for psychiatric patients. Thirty patients (8.1%) missed 1 or more doses of a key medication in the peri-transport process, and 8 (2.2%) missed 2 or more.
Overcrowding of hospitals is a significant problem in many Canadian EDs, resulting in measurable increases in lengths of stay. Transfers arranged to other facilities for admission further prolong lengths of stay. Increased boarding times can result in missed medications, which may increase patient morbidity. Further study is needed to assess the need for capacity transfers and the possible risk to patients associated with periods of transitional care.
PubMed ID
17324306 View in PubMed
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Caries and crowding in the teeth of the living Alaskan Eskimo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature541
Source
American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 16(4):451-462.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1932
Author
Collins, Jr., H.B.
Author Affiliation
U.S. National Museum
Source
American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 16(4):451-462.
Date
1932
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Kanakanak
Mekoryuk
Hooper Bay
Nome
King Island
Kotzebue
Kivalina
Point Hope
Dental caries
Dental crowding
Diet, general
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 428.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 1112.
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Catch-up growth in childhood and death from coronary heart disease: longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203160
Source
BMJ. 1999 Feb 13;318(7181):427-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-13-1999
Author
J G Eriksson
T. Forsén
J. Tuomilehto
P D Winter
C. Osmond
D J Barker
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, Diabetes and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1999 Feb 13;318(7181):427-31
Date
Feb-13-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
Birth weight
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Coronary Disease - mortality
Crowding
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Growth Disorders - mortality
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Social Class
Abstract
To examine whether catch-up growth during childhood modifies the increased risk of death from coronary heart disease that is associated with reduced intrauterine growth.
Follow up study of men whose body size at birth was recorded and who had an average of 10 measurements taken of their height and weight through childhood.
Helsinki, Finland.
3641 men who were born in Helsinki University Central Hospital during 1924-33 and who went to school in Helsinki.
Hazard ratios for death from coronary heart disease.
Death from coronary heart disease was associated with low birth weight and, more strongly, with a low ponderal index at birth. Men who died from coronary heart disease had an above average body mass index at all ages from 7 to 15 years. In a simultaneous regression the hazard ratio for death from the disease increased by 14% (95% confidence interval 8% to 19%; P
Notes
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PubMed ID
9974455 View in PubMed
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105 records – page 1 of 11.