Skip header and navigation

Refine By

71 records – page 1 of 8.

A < 1.7 cM interval is responsible for Dmo1 obesity phenotypes in OLETF rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47295
Source
Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2004 Jan-Feb;31(1-2):110-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Takeshi K Watanabe
Shiro Okuno
Yuki Yamasaki
Toshihide Ono
Keiko Oga
Ayako Mizoguchi-Miyakita
Hideo Miyao
Mikio Suzuki
Hiroshi Momota
Yoshihiro Goto
Hiroichi Shinomiya
Haretsugu Hishigaki
Isamu Hayashi
Toshihiro Asai
Shigeyuki Wakitani
Toshihisa Takagi
Yusuke Nakamura
Akira Tanigami
Author Affiliation
Otsuka GEN Research Institute, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 463-10 Kagasuno, Kawauchi-cho, Tokushima 771-0192, Japan. tkw_watanabe@research.otsuka.co.jp
Source
Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2004 Jan-Feb;31(1-2):110-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Congenic
Body Weight - genetics
Crosses, Genetic
Diabetes Mellitus - genetics
Female
Hyperglycemia - genetics
Hyperlipidemia - blood - genetics
Male
Obesity
Phenotype
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred OLETF
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
1. Dmo1 (Diabetes Mellitus OLETF type I) is a major quantitative trait locus for dyslipidaemia, obesity and diabetes phenotypes of male Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. 2. Our congenic lines, produced by transferring Dmo1 chromosomal segments from the non-diabetic Brown Norway (BN) rat into the OLETF strain, have confirmed the strong, wide-range therapeutic effects of Dmo1 on dyslipidaemia, obesity and diabetes in the fourth (BC4) and fifth (BC5) generations of congenic animals. Analysis of a relatively small number of BC5 rats (n = 71) suggested that the critical Dmo1 interval lies within a
PubMed ID
14756694 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abundance of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC2 is increased by high-fat feeding in Fischer 344 X Brown Norway (F1) rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90141
Source
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2009 Apr;296(4):F762-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Riazi Shahla
Tiwari Swasti
Sharma Nikhil
Rash Arjun
Ecelbarger C M
Author Affiliation
Associate Professor, Dept. of Medicine, Georgetown Univ., 4000 Reservoir Rd, NW, Washington, DC, 20007, USA.
Source
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2009 Apr;296(4):F762-70
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Biological Markers - urine
Blood pressure
Blotting, Western
Crosses, Genetic
Cyclic N-Oxides - pharmacology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - metabolism
Dinoprost - analogs & derivatives - urine
Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology
Furosemide - pharmacology
Glucose Intolerance - metabolism - physiopathology
Hypertension - metabolism - physiopathology
Insulin Resistance
Kidney Medulla - drug effects - metabolism
Male
NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester - pharmacology
Natriuresis
Nitric Oxide - urine
Nitric Oxide Synthase - antagonists & inhibitors - metabolism
Oxidative Stress
Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Sodium Potassium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors - pharmacology
Sodium-Potassium-Chloride Symporters - antagonists & inhibitors - metabolism
Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase - metabolism
Spin Labels
Telemetry
Time Factors
Up-Regulation
Abstract
Insulin resistance is associated with hypertension by mechanisms likely involving the kidney. To determine how the major apical sodium transporter of the thick ascending limb, the bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) is regulated by high-fat feeding, we treated young male, Fischer 344 X Brown Norway (F344BN) rats for 8 wk with diets containing either normal (NF, 4%) or high (HF, 36%) fat, by weight, primarily as lard. HF-fed rats had impaired glucose tolerance, increased urine excretion of 8-isoprostane (a marker of oxidative stress), increased protein levels for NKCC2 (50-125%) and the renal outer medullary potassium channel (106%), as well as increased natriuretic response to furosemide (20-40%). To test the role of oxidative stress in this response, in study 2, rats were fed the NF or HF diet plus plain drinking water, or water containing N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (100 mg/l), or tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic (1 mmol/l). The combination of tempol with HF nullified the increase in medullary NKCC2, while l-NAME with HF led to the highest expression of medullary NKCC2 (to 498% of NF mean). However, neither of these drugs dramatically affected the elevated natriuretic response to furosemide with HF. Finally, l-NAME led to a marked increase in blood pressure (measured by radiotelemetry), which was significantly enhanced with HF. Mean arterial blood pressure at 7 wk was as follows (mmHg): NF, 100 +/- 2; NF plus l-NAME, 122 +/- 3; and HF plus l-NAME, 131 +/- 2. Overall, HF feeding increased the abundance of NKCC2. Inappropriately high sodium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb via NKCC2 may contribute to hypertension with insulin resistance.
PubMed ID
19193725 View in PubMed
Less detail

Additive and non-additive genetic architecture of two different-sized populations of Scabiosa canescens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46070
Source
Heredity. 2001 Jun;86(Pt 6):648-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
P. Waldmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Systematic Botany, University of Lund, Ostra Vallgatan 14-20, SE-22361, Lund, Sweden. Patrick.Waldmann@oulu.fi
Source
Heredity. 2001 Jun;86(Pt 6):648-57
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Angiosperms - genetics
Crosses, Genetic
Gene Frequency
Genes, Dominant - genetics
Genetics, Population
Genotype
Likelihood Functions
North Carolina
Phenotype
Quantitative Trait, Heritable
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Selection (Genetics)
Abstract
Future adaptation to changes in the environment depends on the existence of additive genetic variances within populations. Recently, considerable attention has also been given to the non-additive component, which plays an important role in inbreeding depression and bottleneck situations. In this study, I used data from a North Carolina II crossing experiment, analysed with restricted maximum-likelihood methods, to estimate the additive and dominance genetic (co)variances for eight quantitative characters in two different-sized populations of Scabiosa canescens, a rare and threatened plant in Sweden. There was no evidence for genetic erosion in the small Hällestad population ( approximately 25 individuals) relative to the large Ahus population ( approximately 5000 individuals). In fact, slightly higher heritabilities were found in the Hällestad population. The additive genetic variance was statistically significant for all traits in both populations, but only a few additive covariances reached significance. The Hällestad population also had higher mean levels and more traits with significant dominance variance than the Ahus population. The variance attributable to maternal effects was too low to be considered significant. There was only a weak correspondence between heritabilities for each trait in the present study and previous estimates based on open-pollinated families of the same populations, but the mean heritability (over characters) was consistent between the studies.
PubMed ID
11595045 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related changes in cardiac structure and function in Fischer 344 x Brown Norway hybrid rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83284
Source
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2006 Jan;290(1):H304-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Hacker Timothy A
McKiernan Susan H
Douglas Pamela S
Wanagat Jonathan
Aiken Judd M
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA. th2@medicine.wisc.edu
Source
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2006 Jan;290(1):H304-11
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Body Weight
Crosses, Genetic
Echocardiography
Elasticity
Fibrosis
Heart - anatomy & histology - physiology
Heart Ventricles - anatomy & histology - pathology
Hemodynamic Processes
Male
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN - physiology
Rats, Inbred F344 - physiology
Reference Values
Abstract
The effects of aging on cardiovascular function and cardiac structure were determined in a rat model recommended for gerontological studies. A cross-sectional analysis assessed cardiac changes in male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats (FBN) from adulthood to the very aged (n = 6 per 12-, 18-, 21-, 24-, 27-, 30-, 33-, 36-, and 39-mo-old group). Rats underwent echocardiographic and hemodynamic analyses to determine standard values for left ventricular (LV) mass, LV wall thickness, LV chamber diameter, heart rate, LV fractional shortening, mitral inflow velocity, LV relaxation time, and aortic/LV pressures. Histological analyses were used to assess LV fibrotic infiltration and cardiomyocyte volume density over time. Aged rats had an increased LV mass-to-body weight ratio and deteriorated systolic function. LV systolic pressure declined with age. Histological analysis demonstrated a gradual increase in fibrosis and a decrease in cardiomyocyte volume density with age. We conclude that, although significant physiological and morphological changes occurred in heart function and structure between 12 and 39 mo of age, these changes did not likely contribute to mortality. We report reference values for cardiac function and structure in adult FBN male rats through very old age at 3-mo intervals.
PubMed ID
16143657 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternative splicing of interleukin-6 mRNA in mice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63300
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2004 Jul;138(1):73-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
O P Yatsenko
M L Filipenko
E A Khrapov
E N Voronina
S V Sennikov
V A Kozlov
Author Affiliation
Laboratory for Regulation of Immunopoiesis, Institute of Clinical Immunology, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences.
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2004 Jul;138(1):73-6
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alternative Splicing
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Binding Sites
Crosses, Genetic
Erythrocytes - immunology
Exons
Female
Interleukin-6 - chemistry - genetics
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Mice, Inbred CBA
Molecular Sequence Data
Placenta - metabolism
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Protein Biosynthesis
Protein Isoforms - chemistry
Protein Structure, Secondary
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Sequence Deletion
Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Sheep
Spleen - metabolism
Abstract
Expression of mRNA for interleukin-6, interleukin-6Delta3, and interleukin-6Delta5 was detected in placental tissue (second and third trimesters of pregnancy) and spleen of mice immunized with sheep erythrocytes in high dose. We hypothesize that translation of mRNA yields proteins capable of binding to individual subunits of the interleukin-6 receptor and possessing effector functions.
PubMed ID
15514729 View in PubMed
Less detail

Autoimmune interstitial nephritis induced in inbred mice. Analysis of mouse tubular basement membrane antigen and genetic control of immune response to it.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57816
Source
Am J Pathol. 1988 Aug;132(2):304-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1988
Author
S. Ueda
M. Wakashin
Y. Wakashin
H. Yoshida
R. Azemoto
K. Iesato
T. Mori
Y. Mori
M. Ogawa
K. Okuda
Author Affiliation
First Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan.
Source
Am J Pathol. 1988 Aug;132(2):304-18
Date
Aug-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies - analysis
Antibody formation
Antigens - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - genetics - immunology
Basement Membrane - immunology
Cell Division
Crosses, Genetic
Hybridization, Genetic
Immunization, Passive
Kidney - immunology
Kidney Tubules - immunology
Lymphocytes - immunology - pathology
Mice
Mice, Inbred Strains - genetics - immunology
Nephritis, Interstitial - genetics - immunology
Spleen - immunology - pathology
Abstract
Purified murine tubular basement membrane (TBM) antigen (molecular weight, 32,000) induced interstitial lesions in Brown Norway (BN) rats. TBM antigen prepared from mice of 3 inbred strains--BALB/c, C3H/He, and C57BL/6--and outbred ddY mice possessed both antigenicity and nephritogenecity. Using these TBM antigens, the roles of humoral and cellular immunity in the development of interstitial nephritis (IN) and the genetic control of the induction of IN in inbred mice were investigated. BALB/c mice were highly susceptible to IN and showed a high antibody response and a high lymphocyte proliferative response to syngeneic and allogeneic TBM antigen, whereas C57BL/6 mice did not. C3H/He mice, in which minimal interstitial lesions developed, showed a high antibody response but a low proliferative response of T cells to TBM antigen. TBM antigen sensitized T cells induced interstitial lesions, but anti-TBM antisera did not do so. Thus, the development of IN seemed to be related closely to cellular immunity. Further studies with their hybrids, backcrosses, congenic mice, and recombinant mice suggested that the induction of IN and the immune response to TBM antigen are controlled by 1 or a few dominant genes, whose loci are within, or closely linked to, the H-2 complex.
PubMed ID
3400774 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bayesian inference of inbreeding depression in controlled crosses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45887
Source
Evolution Int J Org Evolution. 2003 Aug;57(8):1947-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Patrik Waldmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, 900 14 Oulu, Finland. patrik.waldmann@rni.helsinki.fi
Source
Evolution Int J Org Evolution. 2003 Aug;57(8):1947-51
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Angiosperms - genetics
Bayes Theorem
Crosses, Genetic
Inbreeding
Models, Genetic
Abstract
This study shows how a Gibbs sampling approach can be used for Bayesian inference of inbreeding depression. The method presented is mainly concerned with organisms that can be both selfed and outcrossed. Tests performed on simulated data with unequal variances and missing observations show that the method works well. Real data from the plant Scabiosa canescens is also analyzed.
PubMed ID
14503634 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biogenesis of the mitochondrial Tom40 channel in skeletal muscle from aged animals and its adaptability to chronic contractile activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98235
Source
Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2010 Jun;298(6):C1308-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Anna-Maria Joseph
Vladimir Ljubicic
Peter J Adhihetty
David A Hood
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York Univesity, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2010 Jun;298(6):C1308-14
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Age Factors
Aging - metabolism
Animals
Crosses, Genetic
Male
Membrane Transport Proteins - metabolism
Mitochondria, Muscle - metabolism
Mitochondrial Membranes - metabolism
Mitochondrial Proteins - metabolism
Muscle Contraction
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism
Protein Multimerization
Protein Transport
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Abstract
Evidence exists that mitochondrial content and/or function is reduced in muscle of aging individuals. The purposes of this study were to investigate the contribution of outer membrane protein import and assembly processes to this decline and to determine whether the assembly process could adapt to chronic contractile activity (CCA). Tom40 assembly into the translocases of the outer membrane (TOM complex) was measured in subsarcolemmal mitochondria obtained from young (6 mo old) and aged (36 mo old) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway animals. While the initial import of Tom40 did not differ between young and aged animals, its subsequent assembly into the final approximately 380 kDa complex was 2.2-fold higher (P
Notes
RefSource: Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2010 Jun;298(6):C1298-300
PubMed ID
20107041 View in PubMed
Less detail

The characteristics of motor activity in ISIAH rats in an open field test are controlled by genes on chromosomes 2 and 16.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90762
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2009 Jan;39(1):57-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Redina O E
Smolenskaya S E
Maslova L N
Sakharov D G
Markel' A L
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia. oredina@bionet.nsc.ru
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2009 Jan;39(1):57-64
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chromosomes, Mammalian - genetics
Corticosterone - blood
Crosses, Genetic
Genetic markers
Hypertension - genetics - physiopathology
Male
Motor Activity - genetics
Quantitative Trait Loci
Rats
Species Specificity
Abstract
Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) analysis was used to identify the loci of polygenic characteristics in a study of the genetic determination of the behavior of rats with inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension (ISIAH rats). Analysis was performed using males of two populations of F2 hybrids (ISIAH x WAG) of different ages: 3-4 (n = 106) and six months (n = 130). Chromosomes 2 and 16 in the young population of F2 rats showed significant associations between two characteristics of behavior in ISIAH rats and genetic loci: a) the rats' motor activity at the periphery of the open field area with loci in the regions of markers D2Rat157-D2Rat88 (LOD score 4.83; p = 0.000058) and D16Rat32 (LOD score 3.71; p = 0.00023). Together, these two loci accounted for 42.9% of the trait variability; b) the rats' motor activity during the first minute of the open field test and loci in the region of the marker D16Rat58 (LOD score 3.78; p = 0.00028). Results obtained by QTL analysis demonstrated a relationship between the genetic control of these traits and the animals' age.
PubMed ID
19089625 View in PubMed
Less detail

71 records – page 1 of 8.