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Albuminuria and Microalbuminuria as Predictors of Cognitive Performance in a General Population: An 11-Year Follow-Up Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298098
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 62(2):635-648
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Laura L Ekblad
Sini Toppala
Jouni K Johansson
Seppo Koskinen
Jouko Sundvall
Juha O Rinne
Pauli Puukka
Matti Viitanen
Antti Jula
Author Affiliation
Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, c/o Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 62(2):635-648
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Cognition
Cognitive Dysfunction - epidemiology
Creatinine - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kidney - physiopathology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk factors
Abstract
Microalbuminuria, defined as urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR)>3.0?mg/mmol and = 30?mg/mmol, is an early marker of endothelial damage of the renal glomeruli. Recent research suggests an association among microalbuminuria, albuminuria (UACR?>?3.0?mg/mmol), and cognitive impairment. Previous studies on microalbuminuria, albuminuria, and cognition in the middle-aged have not provided repeated cognitive testing at different time-points. We hypothesized that albuminuria (micro- plus macroalbuminuria) and microalbuminuria would predict cognitive decline independently of previously reported risk factors for cognitive decline, including cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, we hypothesized that UACR levels even below the cut-off for microalbuminuria might be associated with cognitive functioning. These hypotheses were tested in the Finnish nationwide, population-based Health 2000 Survey (n?=?5,921, mean age 52.6, 55.0% women), and its follow-up, Health 2011 (n?=?3,687, mean age at baseline 49.3, 55.6% women). Linear regression analysis was used to determine the associations between measures of albuminuria and cognitive performance. Cognitive functions were assessed with verbal fluency, word-list learning, word-list delayed recall (at baseline and at follow-up), and with simple and visual choice reaction time tests (at baseline only). Here, we show that micro- plus macroalbuminuria associated with poorer word-list learning and a slower reaction time at baseline, with poorer word-list learning at follow-up, and with a steeper decline in word-list learning during 11 years after multivariate adjustments. Also, higher continuous UACR consistently associated with poorer verbal fluency at levels below microalbuminuria. These results suggest that UACR might have value in evaluating the risk for cognitive decline.
PubMed ID
29480195 View in PubMed
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The association between mental health symptoms and mobility limitation among Russian, Somali and Kurdish migrants: a population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266869
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:275
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Shadia Rask
Anu E Castaneda
Päivikki Koponen
Päivi Sainio
Sari Stenholm
Jaana Suvisaari
Teppo Juntunen
Tapio Halla
Tommi Härkänen
Seppo Koskinen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:275
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Checklist
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - ethnology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Iraq - ethnology
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Russia - ethnology
Somalia - ethnology
Somatoform Disorders - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Research has demonstrated a bidirectional relationship between physical function and depression, but studies on their association in migrant populations are scarce. We examined the association between mental health symptoms and mobility limitation in Russian, Somali and Kurdish migrants in Finland.
We used data from the Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study (Maamu). The participants comprised 1357 persons of Russian, Somali or Kurdish origin aged 18-64 years. Mobility limitation included self-reported difficulties in walking 500?m or stair climbing. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25) and symptoms of somatization using the somatization subscale of the Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R). A comparison group of the general Finnish population was selected from the Health 2011 study.
Anxiety symptoms were positively associated with mobility limitation in women (Russians odds ratio [OR] 2.98; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-6.94, Somalis OR 6.41; 95% CI 2.02-20.29 and Kurds OR 2.67; 95% CI 1.41-5.04), after adjustment for socio-demographic factors, obesity and chronic diseases. Also somatization increased the odds for mobility limitation in women (Russians OR 4.29; 95% CI 1.76-10.44, Somalis OR 18.83; 95% CI 6.15-57.61 and Kurds OR 3.53; 95% CI 1.91-6.52). Depressive symptoms were associated with mobility limitation in Russian and Kurdish women (Russians OR 3.03; 95% CI 1.27-7.19 and Kurds OR 2.64; 95% CI 1.39-4.99). Anxiety symptoms and somatization were associated with mobility limitation in Kurdish men when adjusted for socio-demographic factors, but not after adjusting for obesity and chronic diseases. Finnish women had similar associations as the migrant women, but Finnish men and Kurdish men showed varying associations.
Mental health symptoms are significantly associated with mobility limitation both in the studied migrant populations and in the general Finnish population. The joint nature of mental health symptoms and mobility limitation should be recognized by health professionals, also when working with migrants. This association should be addressed when developing health services and health promotion.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25884326 View in PubMed
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The association between socioeconomic status and depression among older adults in Finland, Poland and Spain: A comparative cross-sectional study of distinct measures and pathways.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297880
Source
J Affect Disord. 2018 12 01; 241:311-318
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-01-2018
Author
Joan Domènech-Abella
Jordi Mundó
Matilde Leonardi
Sommath Chatterji
Beata Tobiasz-Adamczyk
Seppo Koskinen
Jose Luis Ayuso-Mateos
Josep Maria Haro
Author Affiliation
Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; Department of Sociology, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: j.domenech@pssjd.org.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2018 12 01; 241:311-318
Date
12-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Income
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Poland - epidemiology
Prevalence
Social Class
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
Socioeconomic status, as measured by education, occupation or income, is associated with depression. However, data are lacking on the psychosocial, material and behavioral mediators of these associations. We have examined the association of education, occupation and income with depression and the potential mediations using community-based data.
A total of 7,966 older adults were interviewed in Finland, Poland and Spain. The differential associations between depression and SES, mediator variables, country of residence and cofounder variables, such as chronic physical conditions, were assessed through logistic regression models. Meditation analyses were carried out using khb method for Stata 13.1.
Education, followed by household income, were the SES indicators most frequently significantly associated with depression. These SES markers, but not occupation, showed an independent effect in this association. Psychosocial factors and loneliness in particular showed the strongest associations with depression among mediator variables. However, material factors and, especially, financial strain had a higher mediating function in the association between SES and depression. Overall, SES markers, chronic conditions and mediation factors were more positive in Finland than in Poland and Spain.
Improving psychosocial and material dimensions as well as access to the educational system for older adults might result in a reduction in the prevalence of depression in the general population and particularly among individuals with low SES.
PubMed ID
30142590 View in PubMed
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The association between visual acuity and functional limitations: findings from a nationally representative population survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159610
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2007 Nov-Dec;14(6):333-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Arja Laitinen
Päivi Sainio
Seppo Koskinen
Sirkka-Liisa Rudanko
Leila Laatikainen
Arpo Aromaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Functional Capacity, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. arja.laitinen@ktl.fi
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2007 Nov-Dec;14(6):333-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity - physiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Vision, Low - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
To determine the independent effect of visual acuity on individual activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and mobility.
Cross-sectional survey on a sample representing the Finnish population aged 55 years and above. Of the 3392 eligible people, 3185 (93.9%) were interviewed, 2870 (84.6%) attended a comprehensive health examination, and 2781 (82.0%) had distance visual acuity (VA) assessed. A home interview included assessment of ADL, IADL and mobility, demographic variables and chronic conditions. Mobility measurements and binocular VA were assessed during the examination.
Prevalence of ADL, IADL, and mobility limitations increased with decreasing VA (p or =0.8) after adjustment for socio-demographic and behavioral factors, and chronic conditions (OR 4.36, 95%CI 2.44-7.78). Limitations in IADL and measured mobility were five times as likely (OR 4.82, 95%CI 2.38-9.76 and OR 5.37, 95%CI 2.44-7.78, respectively), and self-reported mobility limitations were three times as likely (OR 3.07, 95%CI 1.67-9.63) as in persons with good VA.
Decreased VA is strongly associated with functional limitations, and even a slight decrease in VA was found to be associated with limitations in functioning.
PubMed ID
18161606 View in PubMed
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The association of social support at work and in private life with mental health and antidepressant use: the Health 2000 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155538
Source
J Affect Disord. 2009 May;115(1-2):36-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Marjo Sinokki
Katariina Hinkka
Kirsi Ahola
Seppo Koskinen
Mika Kivimäki
Teija Honkonen
Pauli Puukka
Timo Klaukka
Jouko Lönnqvist
Marianna Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Lemminkäisenkatu 14-18 B, FI-20520 Turku, Finland. marjo.sinokki@utu.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2009 May;115(1-2):36-45
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Social support is assumed to protect mental health, but it is not known whether low social support at work increases the risk of common mental disorders or antidepressant medication. This study, carried out in Finland 2000-2003, examined the associations of low social support at work and in private life with DSM-IV depressive and anxiety disorders and subsequent antidepressant medication.
Social support was measured with self-assessment scales in a cohort of 3429 employees from a population-based health survey. A 12-month prevalence of depressive or anxiety disorders was examined with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), which encompasses operationalized criteria for DSM-IV diagnoses and allows the estimation of DSM-IV diagnoses for major mental disorders. Purchases of antidepressants in a 3-year follow-up were collected from the nationwide pharmaceutical register of the Social Insurance Institution.
Low social support at work and in private life was associated with a 12-month prevalence of depressive or anxiety disorders (adjusted odds ratio 2.02, 95% CI 1.48-2.82 for supervisory support, 1.65, 95% CI 1.05-2.59 for colleague support, and 1.62, 95% CI 1.12-2.36 for private life support). Work-related social support was also associated with subsequent antidepressant use.
This study used a cross-sectional analysis of DSM-IV mental disorders. The use of purchases of antidepressant as an indicator of depressive and anxiety disorders can result in an underestimation of the actual mental disorders.
Low social support, both at work and in private life, is associated with DSM-IV mental disorders, and low social support at work is also a risk factor for mental disorders treated with antidepressant medication.
PubMed ID
18722019 View in PubMed
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The contribution of travel-related urban zones, cycling and pedestrian networks and green space to commuting physical activity among adults - a cross-sectional population-based study using geographical information systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284655
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 11;16(1):760
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-11-2016
Author
Tomi E Mäki-Opas
Katja Borodulin
Heli Valkeinen
Sari Stenholm
Anton E Kunst
Thomas Abel
Tommi Härkänen
Leena Kopperoinen
Pekka Itkonen
Ritva Prättälä
Sakari Karvonen
Seppo Koskinen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 11;16(1):760
Date
Aug-11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bicycling - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Environment
Exercise
Female
Finland
Geographic Information Systems
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pedestrians - statistics & numerical data
Self Report
Transportation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Walking - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The current political agenda aims to promote active environments and physical activity while commuting to work, but research on it has provided mixed results. This study examines whether the proximity of green space and people's residence in different travel-related urban zones contributes to commuting physical activity.
Population-based cross-sectional health examination survey, Health 2011 study, and geographical information system (GIS) data were utilized. The GIS data on green space and travel-related urban zones were linked to the individuals of the Health 2011 study, based on their home geocoordinates. Commuting physical activity was self-reported. Logistic regression models were applied, and age, gender, education, leisure-time and occupational physical activity were adjusted. Analyses were limited to those of working age, living in the core-urban areas of Finland and having completed information on commuting physical activity (n?=?2 098).
Home location in a pedestrian zone of a main centre (odds ratio?=?1.63; 95 % confidence interval?=?1.06-2.51) or a pedestrian zone of a sub-centre (2.03; 1.09-3.80) and higher proportion of cycling and pedestrian networks (3.28; 1.71-6.31) contributed to higher levels of commuting physical activity. The contribution remained after adjusting for all the environmental attributes and individuals. Based on interaction analyses, women living in a public transport zone were almost two times more likely to be physically active while commuting compared to men. A high proportion of recreational green space contributed negatively to the levels of commuting physical activity (0.73; 0.57-0.94) after adjusting for several background factors. Based on interaction analyses, individuals aged from 44 to 54 years and living in sub-centres, men living in pedestrian zones of sub-centres, and those individuals who are physically inactive during leisure-time were less likely to be physically active while commuting.
Good pedestrian and cycling infrastructure may play an important role in promoting commuting physical activity among the employed population, regardless of educational background, leisure-time and occupational physical activity. Close proximity to green space and a high proportion of green space near the home may not be sufficient to initiate commuting physical activity in Finland, where homes surrounded by green areas are often situated in car-oriented zones far from work places.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27516181 View in PubMed
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Differences in older adults' use of primary and specialist care services in two Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70856
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2004 Dec;14(4):375-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Anna Liisa Suominen-Taipale
Seppo Koskinen
Tuija Martelin
Jostein Holmen
Roar Johnsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. liisa.suominen-taipale@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2004 Dec;14(4):375-80
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - utilization
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Specialties, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to compare elderly persons' self-reported use of physician services and associated sociodemographic factors and self-rated health in two Nordic countries with different health care systems, Finland and Norway. METHODS: Population based, cross-sectional surveys conducted in Norway (1995-97) and in Finland (1997) were employed. In the Norwegian data a total of 7,919 individuals, and in the Finnish data 1, 500 individuals, aged 65-74 years old were included in the samples. The outcome variables were having visited a general practitioner, a specialist or both during the past 12 months. Associations between utilization of physician's services and sociodemographic factors and self-rated health were analysed by multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: Approximately the same proportion of elderly in Norway and Finland reported having visited a physician during the previous 12 months. Finnish elderly more often visited a specialist compared to Norwegians. Self-rated health was strongly associated with visits to a specialist in both countries and to a GP in Norway. In Finland visits to a GP were only weakly connected with self-rated health. The use of specialist services increased with increasing education in both countries and in Finland the association was steeper than in Norway. Marital status was not consistently associated with visiting a physician. CONCLUSIONS: Higher rates of specialist care among the elderly in Finland may indicate a more efficient gate-keeping role among Norwegian general practitioners or inducement caused by two overlapping service sectors. Inconsistent associations between utilization and health variables may be due to cultural differences.
PubMed ID
15542872 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do childhood social circumstances affect overweight and obesity in early adulthood?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153186
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Mar;37(2):206-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Laura Kestilä
Ossi Rahkonen
Tuija Martelin
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Seppo Koskinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Functional Capacity, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland. laura.kestila@ktl.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Mar;37(2):206-19
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Overweight - epidemiology - etiology
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the association of childhood circumstances with overweight and obesity in early adulthood, to analyse whether the respondent's education and current circumstances mediate these associations, and to explore whether the respondent's health behaviour affects these associations.
This was a cross-sectional study with retrospective inquiries.
The study was based on a representative two-stage cluster sample (N= 1894, participation rate 79%) of young adults aged 18-29 years in Finland in 2000. The outcome measure was three-class body mass index (BMI) (normal weight, overweight, and obesity). Multinomial logistic regression was used as the main statistical tool.
In women, childhood circumstances (low parental education (relative risk ratio (RRR) = 2.43), parental unemployment (RRR= 2.09) and single-parent family (RRR= 1.99)) increased the risk of overweight (25 or = 30) in women in the age-adjusted models, and being bullied at school remained a significant predictor after adjusting for all childhood and current determinants. In both genders, the strong association between parental education and obesity remained significant after adjusting for all other determinants (for the lowest educational category, RRR= 3.56 in women, and RRR= 6.55 in men).
Childhood factors predict overweight and obesity in early adulthood. This effect is stronger on obesity than on overweight and in women than in men, and it seems to be partly mediated by adult circumstances. The results emphasize the lasting effect of childhood socioeconomic position on adult obesity. When preventive policies are being planned, social circumstances in childhood should be addressed.
PubMed ID
19141544 View in PubMed
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Educational differences in mobility: the contribution of physical workload, obesity, smoking and chronic conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164154
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 May;61(5):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Päivi Sainio
Tuija Martelin
Seppo Koskinen
Markku Heliövaara
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Health and Functional Capacity, Mannerheimintie 166, 00300 Helsinki, Finland. paivi.sainio@ktl.fi
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 May;61(5):401-8
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - psychology
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled Persons
Educational Status
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Movement Disorders - etiology - psychology
Obesity - complications - psychology
Osteoarthritis - complications - psychology
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Class
Workload
Abstract
In earlier studies, determinants of socioeconomic gradient in mobility have not been measured comprehensively.
To assess the contribution of chronic morbidity, obesity, smoking and physical workload to inequalities in mobility.
This was a cross-sectional study on 2572 persons (76% of a nationally representative sample of the Finnish population aged > or = 55 years). Mobility limitations were measured by self-reports and performance rates.
According to a wide array of self-reported and test-based indicators, persons with a lower level of education showed more mobility limitations than those with a higher level. The age-adjusted ORs for limitations in stair climbing were threefold in the lowest-educational category compared with the highest one (OR 3.3 in men and 2.9 in women for self-reported limitations, and 3.5 in men and 2.2 in women for test-based limitations). When obesity, smoking, work-related physical loading and clinically diagnosed chronic diseases were simultaneously accounted for, the educational differences in stair-climbing limitations vanished or were greatly diminished. In women, obesity contributed most to the differences, followed by a history of physically strenuous work, knee and hip osteoarthritis and cardiovascular diseases. In men, diabetes, work-related physical loading, musculoskeletal diseases, obesity and smoking contributed substantially to the inequalities.
Great educational inequalities exist in various measures of mobility. Common chronic diseases, obesity, smoking and workload appeared to be the main pathways from low education to mobility limitations. General health promotion using methods that also yield good results in the lowest-educational groups is thus a good strategy to reduce the disparities in mobility.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17435206 View in PubMed
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The ethnic gap in mental health: A population-based study of Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin migrants in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275748
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 May;44(3):281-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Shadia Rask
Jaana Suvisaari
Seppo Koskinen
Päivikki Koponen
Mulki Mölsä
Riikka Lehtisalo
Carla Schubert
Antti Pakaslahti
Anu Emilia Castaneda
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 May;44(3):281-90
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - ethnology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Iraq - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Russia - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Somalia - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Research demonstrates that migrants are more vulnerable to poor mental health than general populations, but population-based studies with distinct migrant groups are scarce. We aim to (1) assess the prevalence of mental health symptoms in Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin migrants in Finland; (2) compare the prevalence of mental health symptoms in these migrant groups to the Finnish population; (3) determine which socio-demographic factors are associated with mental health symptoms.
We used data from the Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study and Health 2011 Survey. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25), and 1.75 was used as cut-off for clinically significant symptoms. Somatization was measured using the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) somatization scale. The age-adjusted prevalence of mental health symptoms in the studied groups was calculated by gender using predicted margins. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine which socio-demographic factors are associated with mental health symptoms in the studied population groups.
The prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms was higher in Russian women (24%) and Kurdish men (23%) and women (49%) than in the Finnish population (9-10%). These differences were statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
26647096 View in PubMed
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