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ABCB1 haplotypes differentially affect the pharmacokinetics of the acid and lactone forms of simvastatin and atorvastatin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152450
Source
Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Oct;84(4):457-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
J E Keskitalo
K J Kurkinen
P J Neuvoneni
M. Niemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Oct;84(4):457-61
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Area Under Curve
Cross-Over Studies
Female
Finland
Half-Life
Haplotypes
Heptanoic Acids - pharmacokinetics
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - pharmacokinetics
Lactones - pharmacokinetics
Male
P-Glycoprotein - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Pyrroles - pharmacokinetics
Simvastatin - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
ABCB1 haplotypes were determined in 534 healthy Finnish volunteers, of whom 24 participated in a pharmacokinetic study on simvastatin and atorvastatin. The frequencies of occurrence of haplotypes c.1236T-c.2677T-c.3435T and c.1236C-c.2677G-c.3435C were 42.7 and 34.4%, respectively. The simvastatin acid AUC(0-12h) was 60% larger, the atorvastatin AUC(0-infinity) 55% larger, and the atorvastatin half-life 24% longer in subjects with the ABCB1 TTT/TTT genotype (n = 12) than in those with the CGC/CGC genotype (n = 12) (P
PubMed ID
19238649 View in PubMed
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ABCG2 polymorphism markedly affects the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150732
Source
Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2009 Aug;86(2):197-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
J E Keskitalo
O. Zolk
M F Fromm
K J Kurkinen
P J Neuvonen
M. Niemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2009 Aug;86(2):197-203
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters - genetics
Adult
Anticholesteremic Agents - pharmacokinetics
Area Under Curve
Cross-Over Studies
Drug Resistance, Multiple
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Finland
Fluorobenzenes - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
Genotype
Heptanoic Acids - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - pharmacokinetics
Linear Models
Male
Neoplasm Proteins - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Pyrimidines - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
Pyrroles - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
Reference Values
Sulfonamides - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
Abstract
The ABCG2 c.421C>A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was determined in 660 healthy Finnish volunteers, of whom 32 participated in a pharmacokinetic crossover study involving the administration of 20 mg atorvastatin and rosuvastatin. The frequency of the c.421A variant allele was 9.5% (95% confidence interval 8.1-11.3%). Subjects with the c.421AA genotype (n = 4) had a 72% larger mean area under the plasma atorvastatin concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) than individuals with the c.421CC genotype had (n = 16; P = 0.049). In participants with the c.421AA genotype, the rosuvastatin AUC(0-infinity) was 100% greater than in those with c.421CA (n = 12) and 144% greater than in those with the c.421CC genotype. Also, those with the c.421AA genotype showed peak plasma rosuvastatin concentrations 108% higher than those in the c.421CA genotype group and 131% higher than those in the c.421CC genotype group (P
PubMed ID
19474787 View in PubMed
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Acute depressed mood as a trigger of acute coronary syndromes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81829
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2006 Oct 15;60(8):837-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2006
Author
Steptoe Andrew
Strike Philip C
Perkins-Porras Linda
McEwan Jean R
Whitehead Daisy L
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. a.steptoe@ucl.ac.uk
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2006 Oct 15;60(8):837-42
Date
Oct-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Affect - physiology
Aged
Anger - physiology
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Cross-Over Studies
Depression - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Income
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some cases of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may be triggered by emotional states such as anger, but it is not known if acute depressed mood can act as a trigger. METHODS: 295 men and women with a verified ACS were studied. Depressed mood in the two hours before ACS symptom onset was compared with the same period 24 hours earlier (pair-matched analysis), and with usual levels of depressed mood, using case-crossover methods. RESULTS: 46 (18.2%) patients experienced depressed mood in the two hours before ACS onset. The odds of ACS following depressed mood were 2.50 (95% confidence intervals 1.05 to 6.56) in the pair-matched analysis, while the relative risk of ACS onset following depressed mood was 4.33 (95% confidence intervals 3.39 to 6.11) compared with usual levels of depressed mood. Depressed mood preceding ACS onset was more common in lower income patients (p = .032), and was associated with recent life stress, but was not related to psychiatric status. CONCLUSIONS: Acute depressed mood may elicit biological responses that contribute to ACS, including vascular endothelial dysfunction, inflammatory cytokine release and platelet activation. Acute depressed mood may trigger potentially life-threatening cardiac events.
PubMed ID
16780810 View in PubMed
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The acute effect of acupuncture on 20-km cycling performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159410
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2008 Jan;18(1):76-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Satpal Dhillon
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. satpal@ualberta.ca
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2008 Jan;18(1):76-80
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Bicycling
Cross-Over Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Single-Blind Method
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
To examine acupuncture's effect on cycling performance.
This was a prospective, single-blind, patient as own control (repeated measures), crossover design. Subjects underwent 3 tests a week, riding a stationary bike for 20-km as fast as able. Before each test, they received acupuncture (test A), "sham" acupuncture (test B), and no intervention (control, test C) once each in a random order.
University of Alberta, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine.
20 male cyclists (age, 18 to 30 years) were recruited via convenience sampling of students and general public. Athletic ability was assessed through a questionnaire and modified Par-Q.
Acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and no intervention in random order with each subject before each test. Acupuncture points were chosen on the basis of Traditional Chinese Medicine and administered immediately before cycling. Sham was shallow needling of known acupoints.
The outcome measures of each of the tests were time to completion, VAS for lower extremity/exercise-induced pain, Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and blood lactate concentrations, recorded immediately following each test.
Mean times to Test A, B, and C completion were 36.19 +/- 5.23, 37.03 +/- 5.66, and 37.48 +/- 6.00 minutes, respectively, P = 0.76. Mean RPE scores after tests A, B, and C were 17.65 +/- 0.67, 16.95 +/- 0.99, and 16.85 +/- 0.88, respectively, P = 0.0088. Mean VAS scores after tests A, B, and C were 7.72 +/- 0.86, 7.94 +/- 0.78, and 8.08 +/- 0.69, respectively, P = 0.76.
The only statistically significant finding was that acupuncture gave higher RPE scores compared to the other tests. The clinical significance was that the higher RPE scores gave lower time and VAS scores.
PubMed ID
18185043 View in PubMed
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Acute effect of alginate-based preload on satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate in healthy subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132787
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Morten Georg Jensen
Mette Kristensen
Anita Belza
Jes C Knudsen
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. mmgj@life.ku.dk
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alginates - therapeutic use
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body mass index
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Energy Intake - drug effects - physiology
Female
Gastric Emptying - drug effects - physiology
Glucuronic Acid - therapeutic use
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hexuronic Acids - therapeutic use
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Postprandial Period
Reference Values
Satiation - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Viscous dietary fibers such as sodium alginate extracted from brown seaweed have received much attention lately for their potential role in energy regulation through the inhibition of energy intake and increase of satiety feelings. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect on postprandial satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate (GER), by the paracetamol method, of two different volumes of an alginate-based preload in normal-weight subjects. In a four-way placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial, 20 subjects (age: 25.9 ± 3.4 years; BMI: 23.5 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to receive a 3% preload concentration of either low volume (LV; 9.9 g alginate in 330 ml) or high volume (HV; 15.0 g alginate in 500 ml) alginate-based beverage, or an iso-volume placebo beverage. The preloads were ingested 30 min before a fixed breakfast and again before an ad libitum lunch. Consumption of LV-alginate preload induced a significantly lower (8.0%) energy intake than the placebo beverage (P = 0.040) at the following lunch meal, without differences in satiety feelings or paracetamol concentrations. The HV alginate significantly increased satiety feelings (P = 0.038), reduced hunger (P = 0.042) and the feeling of prospective food consumption (P = 0.027), and reduced area under the curve (iAUC) paracetamol concentrations compared to the placebo (P = 0.05). However, only a 5.5% reduction in energy intake was observed for HV alginate (P = 0.20). Although they are somewhat contradictory, our results suggest that alginate consumption does affect satiety feelings and energy intake. However, further investigation on the volume of alginate administered is needed before inferring that this fiber has a possible role in short-term energy regulation.
PubMed ID
21779093 View in PubMed
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The acute effects of inhaled salbutamol on the beat-to-beat variability of heart rate and blood pressure assessed by spectral analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208850
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1997 Apr;43(4):421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
T. Jartti
T. Kaila
K. Tahvanainen
T. Kuusela
T. Vanto
I. Välimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1997 Apr;43(4):421-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Albuterol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Baroreflex - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Bronchospirometry
Child
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Female
Finland
Forced Expiratory Flow Rates - drug effects
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Respiratory Function Tests
Supine Position
Abstract
We wanted to study the effects of a 600 micrograms inhaled salbutamol dose on the cardiovascular and respiratory autonomic nervous regulation in eight children suffering from bronchial asthma.
In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study we continuously measured electrocardiogram, finger systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and flow-volume spirometry at baseline as well as 20 min and 2 h after the drug inhalation. The R-R interval (the time between successive heart beats) and SAP variabilities were assessed by using spectral analysis. Baroreflex sensitivity was assessed by using cross-spectral analysis.
Salbutamol significantly decreased the total and low frequency (LF) variability of R-R intervals as well as the high frequency (HF) variability of R-R intervals and of SAP. Salbutamol significantly increased the LF/HF ratio of R-R intervals and of SAP, minute ventilation, heart rate and forced pulmonary function in comparison with placebo. The weight of the subjects significantly correlated positively with baroreflex sensitivity and negatively with heart rate after the salbutamol inhalation.
We conclude that the acute salbutamol inhalation decreases cardiovagal nervous responsiveness, increases sympathetic dominance in the cardiovascular autonomic balance, and has a tendency to decrease baroreflex sensitivity in addition to improved pulmonary function.
PubMed ID
9146855 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of mustard, horseradish, black pepper and ginger on energy expenditure, appetite, ad libitum energy intake and energy balance in human subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120287
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):556-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2013
Author
N T Gregersen
A. Belza
M G Jensen
C. Ritz
C. Bitz
O. Hels
E. Frandsen
D J Mela
A. Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):556-63
Date
Feb-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Appetite Regulation
Armoracia - chemistry
Black Pepper - adverse effects
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Ginger - chemistry
Humans
Hyperphagia - prevention & control
Lunch
Male
Mustard Plant - chemistry
Postprandial Period
Single-Blind Method
Spices - adverse effects
Thermogenesis
Young Adult
Abstract
Chilli peppers have been shown to enhance diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and reduce energy intake (EI) in some studies, but there are few data on other pungent spices. The primary aim of the present study was to test the acute effects of black pepper (pepper), ginger, horseradish and mustard in a meal on 4 h postprandial DIT. The secondary aim was to examine the effects on subjective appetite measures, ad libitum EI and energy balance. In a five-way placebo-controlled, single-blind, cross-over trial, twenty-two young (age 24·9 (SD 4·6) years), normal-weight (BMI 21·8 (SD 2·1) kg/m²) males were randomly assigned to receive a brunch meal with either pepper (1·3 g), ginger (20 g), horseradish (8·3 g), mustard (21 g) or no spices (placebo). The amounts of spices were chosen from pre-testing to make the meal spicy but palatable. No significant treatment effects were observed on DIT, but mustard produced DIT, which tended to be larger than that of placebo (14 %, 59 (SE 3) v. 52 (SE 2) kJ/h, respectively, P=0·08). No other spice induced thermogenic effects approaching statistical significance. Subjective measures of appetite (P>0·85), ad libitum EI (P=0·63) and energy balance (P=0·67) also did not differ between the treatments. Finally, horseradish decreased heart rate (P=0·048) and increased diastolic blood pressure (P= 0·049) compared with placebo. In conclusion, no reliable treatment effects on appetite, EI or energy balance were observed, although mustard tended to be thermogenic at this dose. Further studies should explore the possible strength and mechanisms of the potential thermogenic effect of mustard actives, and potential enhancement by, for example, combinations with other food components.
PubMed ID
23021155 View in PubMed
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Acute hyperinsulinemia increases the contraction of retinal arterioles induced by elevated blood pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107100
Source
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2013 Dec 1;305(11):H1600-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2013
Author
Peter Jeppesen
Søren Tang Knudsen
Per Løgstrup Poulsen
Anders Hessellund
Ole Schmitz
Toke Bek
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; and.
Source
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2013 Dec 1;305(11):H1600-4
Date
Dec-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Arterial Pressure
Arterioles - physiopathology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Exercise
Homeostasis
Humans
Hyperinsulinism - blood - physiopathology
Insulin - blood
Isometric Contraction
Male
Photic Stimulation
Retinal Vessels - physiopathology
Time Factors
Vasoconstriction
Young Adult
Abstract
Diabetic retinopathy is accompanied by disturbances in retinal blood flow, which is assumed to be related to the diabetic metabolic dysregulation. It has previously been shown that normoinsulinemic hyperglycemia has no effect on the diameter of retinal arterioles at rest and during an increase in the arterial blood pressure induced by isometric exercise. However, the influence of hyperinsulinemia on this response has not been studied in detail. In seven normal persons, the diameter response of retinal arterioles to an increased blood pressure induced by isometric exercise, to stimulation with flickering light, and to the combination of these stimuli was studied during euglycemic normoinsulinemia (protocol N) on one examination day, and euglycemic hyperinsulinemia (protocol H) on another examination day. Isometric exercise induced significant contraction of retinal arterioles at all examinations, but during a repeated examination the diameter response was significantly reduced in the test persons following the N protocol and increased in the persons following the H protocol. Flicker stimulation induced a significant dilatation of retinal arterioles at all examinations, and the response was significantly higher during a repeated examination, irrespective of the insulin level. Repeated exposure to isometric exercise reduces contraction, whereas repeated exposure to flickering light increases dilatation of retinal arterioles in vivo. Hyperinsulinemia increases contraction of retinal arterioles induced by isometric exercise.
PubMed ID
24056905 View in PubMed
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Adrenal suppression in asthmatic children receiving low-dose inhaled budesonide: comparison between dry powder inhaler and pressurized metered-dose inhaler attached to a spacer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15304
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2002 Dec;89(6):566-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Shmuel Goldberg
Tsurit Einot
Nurit Algur
Shimshon Schwartz
Alan C Greenberg
Elie Picard
Dov Virgilis
Eitan Kerem
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Respiratory Medicine, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Hebrew University Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2002 Dec;89(6):566-71
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex - secretion
Aerosols
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology
Biological Availability
Budesonide - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Over Studies
Depression, Chemical
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone - secretion - urine
Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System - drug effects
Inhalation Spacers
Lung - metabolism
Male
Pituitary-Adrenal System - drug effects
Powders
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Dry powder inhalers (DPI) have in recent years become a common mode for administration of inhaled corticosteroids for preventive therapy of asthma. Inhaled steroids delivered by DPI achieve increased lung deposition compared with pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDI), which is associated with increased therapeutic effect. This may be associated with increased systemic absorption. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of adrenal suppression in children using low-dose budesonide given by DPI, as compared with pMDI attached to a large-volume spacer device (pMDI + spacer). METHODS: In an open-labeled crossover study, 15 asthmatic children aged 5 to 15 years received 200 microg of inhaled budesonide twice daily by DPI (Turbuhaler, Astra, Draco AB, Lund, Sweden) and by pMDI + spacer, 1 month each, in a randomized order. Twenty-four-hour urine collections were performed at baseline and at the end of each of the 2 months of the study period, and urinary cortisol and creatinine were measured. RESULTS: Baseline urinary cortisol:creatinine was 0.038 +/- 0.012 microg/mg, similar in both groups. After 1 month of DPI therapy, urinary cortisol:creatinine was reduced by 27 +/- 16% to 0.028 +/- 0.012 microg/mg (P = 0.018). Urinary cortisol:creatinine after 1 month of pMDI + spacer therapy was similar to baseline 0.037 +/- 0.019 microg/mg (P = 0.78). CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of asthmatic children with budesonide 400 microg daily given via a DPI for 1 month was associated with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression. This effect was not observed with the same dose of budesonide administered via pMDI + spacer. This indicates that systemic absorption might be reduced with pMDI + spacer therapy.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2002 Dec;89(6):537-912487216
Comment In: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2003 Jun;90(6):674; author reply 674-512839330
PubMed ID
12487221 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for asthma in Windsor, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126951
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jan-Feb;103(1):4-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eric Lavigne
Paul J Villeneuve
Sabit Cakmak
Author Affiliation
Environmental Issues Division, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON. eric.lavigne@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jan-Feb;103(1):4-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Over Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Particle Size
Risk
Seasons
Abstract
The city of Windsor is recognized to have poor air quality in comparison with other Canadian cities. However, relatively few studies have evaluated associations between day-to-day fluctuations in air pollution levels and respiratory health in Windsor. In this study, we examined associations between short-term changes in ambient air pollution and emergency department (ED) visits for asthma in Windsor.
A time-stratified case-crossover design was applied to 3,728 ED visits for asthma that occurred in Windsor area hospitals between 2002 and 2009. Daily air pollution levels for the region were estimated using Environment Canada's network of fixed-site monitors. ED visits were identified through the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS). Odds ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic regression, and were adjusted for the confounding influence of daily number of influenza ED visits and weather variables using natural spline functions.
Statistically significant associations were observed between ambient air pollution levels and ED visits for asthma in Windsor. Effects were particularly pronounced among children 2 to 14 years of age between April and September. Namely, increases in the interquartile range with 1-day lagged exposure to SO2, NO2 and CO levels were associated with increased risks of an asthma visit of 19%, 25% and 36%, respectively.
Exposure in Windsor to ambient air pollution increases the risk of ED visits for asthma, particularly among children.
PubMed ID
22338320 View in PubMed
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427 records – page 1 of 43.