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The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism: a comparison across Asian Canadians and European Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123132
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Véronique Franche
Patrick Gaudreau
Dave Miranda
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Jacques Lussier, ON, Canada. vfran053@uottawa.ca
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personal Satisfaction
Personality
Students - psychology
Abstract
The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism posits that the 4 within-person combinations of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism (i.e., pure SOP, mixed perfectionism, pure SPP, and nonperfectionism) can be distinctively associated with psychological adjustment. This study examined whether the relationship between the 4 subtypes of perfectionism proposed in the 2 Ã? 2 model (Gaudreau & Thompson, 2010) and academic outcomes (i.e., academic satisfaction and grade-point average [GPA]) differed across 2 sociocultural groups: Asian Canadians and European Canadians. A sample of 697 undergraduate students (23% Asian Canadians) completed self-report measures of dispositional perfectionism, academic satisfaction, and GPA. Results replicated most of the 2 Ã? 2 model's hypotheses on ratings of GPA, thus supporting that nonperfectionism was associated with lower GPA than pure SOP (Hypothesis 1a) but with higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 2). Results also showed that mixed perfectionism was related to higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 3) but to similar levels as pure SOP, thus disproving Hypothesis 4. Furthermore, results provided evidence for cross-cultural differences in academic satisfaction. While all 4 hypotheses were supported among European Canadians, only Hypotheses 1a and 3 were supported among Asian Canadians. Future lines of research are discussed in light of the importance of acknowledging the role of culture when studying the influence of dispositional perfectionism on academic outcomes.
PubMed ID
22731112 View in PubMed
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12-month prevalence of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia in the Swedish general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71618
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):207-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Per Carlbring
Henrik Gustafsson
Lisa Ekselius
Gerhard Andersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Box 1225, Sweden.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):207-11
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agoraphobia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Panic Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The present study examined the prevalence of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia according to DSM-IV criteria in the Swedish general population. METHOD: Data were obtained by means of a postal survey administrated to 1000 randomly selected adults. The panic disorder module of the World Health Organization's Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was included in the survey. RESULTS: 12-month prevalence was estimated at 2.2 % (CI 95 % 1.02 % - 3.38 %). There was a significant sex difference, with a greater prevalence for women (5.6 %) compared to men (1 %). CONCLUSION: The Swedish panic disorder prevalence is relatively consistent with findings in most other parts of the western world.
PubMed ID
12107711 View in PubMed
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The 2006 Canadian dyslipidemia guidelines will prevent more deaths while treating fewer people--but should they be further modified?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155805
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Aug;24(8):617-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Douglas G Manuel
Sarah Wilson
Sarah Maaten
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. doug.manuel@ices.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Aug;24(8):617-20
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Coronary Artery Disease - genetics - mortality - prevention & control
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dyslipidemias - drug therapy - genetics - mortality
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
When clinical guidelines affect large numbers of individuals or substantial resources, it is important to understand their benefits, harms and costs from a population perspective. Many countries' dyslipidemia guidelines include these perspectives.
To compare the effectiveness and efficiency of the 2003 and 2006 Canadian dyslipidemia guidelines for statin treatment in reducing deaths from coronary artery disease (CAD) in the Canadian population.
The 2003 and 2006 Canadian dyslipidemia guidelines were applied to data from the Canadian Heart Health Survey (weighted sample of 12,300,000 people), which includes information on family history and physical measurements, including fasting lipid profiles. The number of people recommended for statin treatment, the potential number of CAD deaths avoided and the number needed to treat to avoid one CAD death with five years of statin therapy were determined for each guideline.
Compared with the 2003 guidelines, 1.4% fewer people (20 to 74 years of age) are recommended statin treatment, potentially preventing 7% more CAD deaths. The number needed to treat to prevent one CAD death over five years decreased from 172 (2003 guideline) to 147 (2006 guideline).
From a population perspective, the 2006 Canadian dyslipidemia recommendations are an improvement of earlier versions, preventing more CAD events and deaths with fewer statin prescriptions. Despite these improvements, the Canadian dyslipidemia recommendations should explicitly address issues of absolute benefit and cost-effectiveness in future revisions.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-3115824409
Cites: Heart. 2005 Dec;91 Suppl 5:v1-5216365341
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Mar 18;332(7542):659-6216543339
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Jun 17;332(7555):141916737980
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Sep;22(11):913-2716971976
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Jan 20;369(9557):168-917240267
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Aug;24(8):62118697284
PubMed ID
18685741 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal spirituality: symbolic healing in Canadian prisons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220386
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1993 Sep;17(3):345-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
J B Waldram
Author Affiliation
Department of Native Studies, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1993 Sep;17(3):345-62
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Healing - psychology
Mental health
Prisoners - psychology
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
Symbolic healing is a complex phenomenon that is still relatively poorly understood. This paper documents a process of symbolic healing which is occurring in Canadian penitentiaries, and which involves Aboriginal offenders in cultural awareness and educational programs. The situation is compounded, however, by the existence of offenders from diverse Aboriginal cultural backgrounds with differing degrees of orientation to Aboriginal and Euro-Canadian cultures. Participants must first receive the necessary education to allow them to identify with the healing symbols so that healing may ensue, and both the healers and the patients must engage in a process of redefining their cultures in search of a common cultural base.
PubMed ID
8269714 View in PubMed
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Abortion in Thailand and Sweden: health services and short-term consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65618
Source
Ciba Found Symp. 1985;115:54-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
T N Singnomklao
Source
Ciba Found Symp. 1985;115:54-66
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Criminal
Abortion, Induced - methods - trends
Abortion, Legal
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Massage
Medicine, Traditional
Pregnancy
Risk
Rural Health - trends
Sweden
Thailand
Abstract
In Thailand, where abortion is still illegal, abortion services (health services) outside Bangkok, and outside hospitals or clinics, are provided by non-physician practitioners. In the studies reported here, those practitioners were interviewed in 1978 and 1981 about their methods and the characteristics of their clients. The first study revealed that massage is the method most widely used by rural practitioners and that uterine injection with different solutions comes second. The second study was in agreement with these findings. The health consequences of these induced abortions were studied by interviewing the clients of the rural practitioners in 1980 and 1981. In Sweden, where abortion has been legal for quite a long time, all women who need an abortion have access to safe and convenient health services throughout the country.
PubMed ID
3849419 View in PubMed
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Accelerometer measured level of physical activity indoors and outdoors during preschool time in Sweden and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130954
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2012 Aug;9(6):801-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Anders Raustorp
Peter Pagels
Cecilia Boldemann
Nilda Cosco
Margareta Söderström
Fredrika Mårtensson
Author Affiliation
School of Sport Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2012 Aug;9(6):801-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - statistics & numerical data
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
North Carolina - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
It is important to understand the correlates of physical activity (PA) to influence policy and create environments that promote PA among preschool children. We compared preschoolers' PA in Swedish and in US settings and objectively examined differences boys' and girls' indoor and outdoor PA regarding different intensity levels and sedentary behavior.
Accelerometer determined PA in 50 children with mean age 52 months, (range 40-67) was recorded during preschool time for 5 consecutive weekdays at 4 sites. The children wore an Actigraph GTIM Monitor.
Raleigh preschool children, opposite to Malmö preschoolers spent significantly more time indoors than outdoors (P
PubMed ID
21952100 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of the controlled-drinking goal among alcohol treatment agencies in New South Wales, Australia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11060
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1997 May;58(3):253-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
M. Donovan
N. Heather
Author Affiliation
Waverley Drug and Alcohol Centre, Bondi Junction, NSW, Australia.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1997 May;58(3):253-6
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - rehabilitation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
New South Wales
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: A survey was conducted to estimate the acceptability of the controlled drinking goal among treatment services in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, and to compare results with similar surveys carried out elsewhere. METHOD: Of all identified alcohol treatment services (N = 295) in NSW, 179 (61%) responded to a mailed questionnaire with useable returns. RESULTS: Nearly three-quarters of respondents endorsed controlled drinking but half of these reported allocating less than 25% of their clients to this goal. Community-based services and alcohol treatment units were significantly more likely to endorse controlled drinking than were residential or private facilities. Community-based services and alcohol treatment units were also more likely to base the appropriateness of controlled drinking on professional experience and research evidence, whereas residential and private facilities relied more on the disease model or agency policy in making this determination. Respondents with tertiary qualifications were more likely to endorse controlled drinking than those without such qualifications, and these respondents were more likely to be found in community-based services and alcohol treatment units. CONCLUSIONS: The results show widespread support for the controlled drinking goal among NSW alcohol treatment services. This is similar to the reported status of controlled drinking in Britain and Norway and stands in marked contrast to the comparative reluctance of treatment services in North America to endorse the controlled drinking goal.
PubMed ID
9130216 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of moderate drinking by alcoholism treatment services in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211210
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1996 Sep;57(5):559-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
H. Rosenberg
E G Devine
N. Rothrock
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, Bowling Green State University, Ohio 43403, USA.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1996 Sep;57(5):559-62
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Ambulatory Care
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Goals
Humans
Patient Admission
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Temperance - psychology
Abstract
The present study was conducted to provide a nationwide survey of acceptance of nonabstinence goals and related alcoholism treatment practices by Canadian alcoholism treatment services.
A random sample of 335 Canadian alcoholism treatment service agencies were mailed a 4-page questionnaire designed to assess acceptance of moderate drinking as a drinking goal and related alcoholism treatment practices.
Acceptance varied by type of service, with considerably more acceptance by outpatient programs (62%) and mixed inpatient/outpatient programs (43%) than inpatient/detoxification/ correctional facilities (27%) and halfway houses (16%). Two-thirds of the respondents who reported moderate drinking as unacceptable in their own agencies categorically rejected moderation for all alcoholism clients.
Individuals seeking services in Canadian alcoholism treatment agencies are more likely to have a choice of drinking goals if they present to an outpatient program than a residential institution, and Canadian agencies appear more accepting of moderation goals than American programs, but less accepting than British and Norwegian service agencies.
PubMed ID
8858554 View in PubMed
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Accidents in Canada: mortality and hospitalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231964
Source
Health Rep. 1989;1(1):23-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
R. Riley
P. Paddon
Source
Health Rep. 1989;1(1):23-50
Date
1989
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Accidents - mortality - statistics & numerical data - trends
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
For Canadians under 45, accidents are the leading cause of both death and hospitalization. For the Canadian population as a whole, accidents rank fourth as a cause of death, after cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and respiratory disease. This article analyzes accident mortality and hospitalization in Canada using age-specific rates, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR), and potential years of life lost (PYLL). The six major causes of accidental death for men are motor vehicle traffic accidents (MVTA), falls, drowning, fires, suffocation and poisoning. For women, the order is slightly different: MVTA, falls, fires, suffocation, poisoning and drowning. From 1971 to 1986, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for accidents decreased by 44% for men and 39% for women. The largest decrease occurred in the under 15 age group. Accidents accounted for 11.5% of total hospital days in 1985, and 8% of hospital discharges. Because young people have the highest rates of accidental death, potential years of life lost (PYLL) are almost as high for accidents as for cardiovascular disease, although CVD deaths outnumbered accidental deaths by almost five to one in 1985.
PubMed ID
2491351 View in PubMed
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1761 records – page 1 of 177.