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1769 records – page 1 of 177.

[Disease and health across cultural borders. Esbjerg, 1-2 December 1988].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231085
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Mar 13;151(11):708
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-13-1989
Author
G. Skylv
S. Voigt
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Mar 13;151(11):708
Date
Mar-13-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Disease
Health
Humans
PubMed ID
2929048 View in PubMed
Less detail

Culture shock: the Chinese connection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234519
Source
RNABC News. 1987 Nov-Dec;19(6):16-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Mills
D. Mallory
T. MacTaggart
Source
RNABC News. 1987 Nov-Dec;19(6):16-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
China
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
Nursing Care
PubMed ID
3423655 View in PubMed
Less detail

Human attribute concepts: relative ubiquity across twelve mutually isolated languages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260810
Source
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2014 Jul;107(1):199-216
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Gerard Saucier
Amber Gayle Thalmayer
Tarik S Bel-Bahar
Source
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2014 Jul;107(1):199-216
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Concept Formation
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
Language
Morals
Personality
Abstract
It has been unclear which human-attribute concepts are most universal across languages. To identify common-denominator concepts, we used dictionaries for 12 mutually isolated languages-Maasai, Supyire Senoufo, Khoekhoe, Afar, Mara Chin, Hmong, Wik-Mungkan, Enga, Fijian, Inuktitut, Hopi, and Kuna-representing diverse cultural characteristics and language families, from multiple continents. A composite list of every person-descriptive term in each lexicon was closely examined to determine the content (in terms of English translation) most ubiquitous across languages. Study 1 identified 28 single-word concepts used to describe persons in all 12 languages, as well as 41 additional terms found in 11 of 12. Results indicated that attribute concepts related to morality and competence appear to be as cross-culturally ubiquitous as basic-emotion concepts. Formulations of universal-attribute concepts from Osgood and Wierzbicka were well-supported. Study 2 compared lexically based personality models on the relative ubiquity of key associated terms, finding that 1- and 2-dimensional models draw on markedly more ubiquitous terms than do 5- or 6-factor models. We suggest that ubiquitous attributes reflect common cultural as well as common biological processes.
PubMed ID
24956320 View in PubMed
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Bridging the gap between the two cultures of alcoholism research and treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232827
Source
Br J Addict. 1988 Jul;83(7):729-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1988
Author
A C Ogborne
Source
Br J Addict. 1988 Jul;83(7):729-33
Date
Jul-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - rehabilitation
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
Ontario
Research
United States
PubMed ID
3207933 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1993 Jul 21;93(29):28-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-21-1993
Author
L P Bergqvist
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1993 Jul 21;93(29):28-9
Date
Jul-21-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Democracy
Denmark
Humans
Nursing Care
Patient Advocacy
Romania
PubMed ID
8165556 View in PubMed
Less detail

A Canadian perspective on learning disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223681
Source
J Learn Disabil. 1992 Jun-Jul;25(6):340-50, 371
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Wiener
L. Siegel
Author Affiliation
Department of Instruction and Special Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Learn Disabil. 1992 Jun-Jul;25(6):340-50, 371
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Education, Special
Humans
Learning Disorders
Abstract
Canadian practice and research with children and adults with learning disabilities are described and analyzed. After an examination of the historical basis for current practice, the societal and cultural factors affecting education of children with learning disabilities, services for adults, and research are discussed. It was found that policy and legislation regarding special education vary considerably from province to province, and identification practices and service delivery models vary even within provinces. The fact that Canada has two official languages (English and French), a large multicultural community, and a Native population with special needs often arising from poverty has an impact on the education of children with learning disabilities and on sample description in research. Although school-age children are relatively well served, services for preschool children and adults with learning disabilities are minimal. The positive features of Canadian service delivery are that most programs are publicly funded, decision making tends to be nonadversarial and collaborative, and the needs of the whole child are typically considered.
PubMed ID
1602229 View in PubMed
Less detail

Translation, cross-cultural adaption and measurement properties of the evidence-based practice profile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279707
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2017 Jan 13;10(1):44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-13-2017
Author
Kristine Berg Titlestad
Anne Kristin Snibsoer
Hilde Stromme
Monica Wammen Nortvedt
Birgitte Graverholt
Birgitte Espehaug
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2017 Jan 13;10(1):44
Date
Jan-13-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Evidence-Based Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Translating
Abstract
The evidence-based practice profile (EBP(2)) questionnaire assesses students' self-reported knowledge, behaviour and attitudes related to evidence-based practice. The aim of this study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt EBP(2) into Norwegian and to evaluate the reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Norwegian version.
EBP(2) was translated and cross-culturally adapted using recommended methodology. Face validity and feasibility were evaluated in a pilot on bachelor students and health and social workers (n = 18). Content validity was evaluated by an expert panel. Nursing students (n = 96), social educator students (n = 27), and health and social workers (n = 26) evaluated the instrument's measurement properties. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to determine internal consistency. Test-retest reliability was evaluated using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM). Discriminative validity was assessed by independent sample t test. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed to assess the structural validity of a five-factor model (Relevance, Sympathy, Terminology, Practice and Confidence) using the comparative fit index (CFI) and the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA). A priori hypotheses on effect sizes and P values were formulated to evaluate the instrument's responsiveness.
The forward-backward translation was repeated three times before arriving at an acceptable version. Eleven of 58 items were re-worded. Face validity and content validity were confirmed. Cronbach's alpha was 0.90 or higher for all domains except Sympathy (0.66). ICC ranged from 0.45 (Practice) to 0.79 (Terminology) and SEM from 0.29 (Relevance) to 0.44 (Practice). There was a significant mean difference between exposure and no exposure to EBP for the domains Relevance, Terminology and Confidence. The CFA did not indicate an acceptable five-factor model fit (CFI = 0.69, RMSEA = 0.09). Responsiveness was as expected or better for all domains except Sympathy.
The cross-culturally adapted EBP(2)-Norwegian version was valid and reliable for the domains Relevance, Terminology and Confidence, and responsive to change for all domains, except Sympathy. Further development of the instrument's items are needed to enhance the instruments reliability for the domains Practice and Sympathy.
PubMed ID
28086967 View in PubMed
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Issues in nursing conference 3. That uncertain knock on the door.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243099
Source
Nurs Mirror. 1982 Jun 30;154(26):33-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-1982
Author
J. Clark
Source
Nurs Mirror. 1982 Jun 30;154(26):33-5
Date
Jun-30-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Finland
Great Britain
Humans
Role
PubMed ID
6920734 View in PubMed
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Universals and cultural variation in turn-taking in conversation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150086
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Jun 30;106(26):10587-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-2009
Author
Tanya Stivers
N J Enfield
Penelope Brown
Christina Englert
Makoto Hayashi
Trine Heinemann
Gertie Hoymann
Federico Rossano
Jan Peter de Ruiter
Kyung-Eun Yoon
Stephen C Levinson
Author Affiliation
Language and Cognition Group, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, 6525XD Nijmegen, The Netherlands. tanya.stivers@mpi.nl
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Jun 30;106(26):10587-92
Date
Jun-30-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
Language
Linguistics - methods
Questionnaires
Verbal Behavior
Abstract
Informal verbal interaction is the core matrix for human social life. A mechanism for coordinating this basic mode of interaction is a system of turn-taking that regulates who is to speak and when. Yet relatively little is known about how this system varies across cultures. The anthropological literature reports significant cultural differences in the timing of turn-taking in ordinary conversation. We test these claims and show that in fact there are striking universals in the underlying pattern of response latency in conversation. Using a worldwide sample of 10 languages drawn from traditional indigenous communities to major world languages, we show that all of the languages tested provide clear evidence for a general avoidance of overlapping talk and a minimization of silence between conversational turns. In addition, all of the languages show the same factors explaining within-language variation in speed of response. We do, however, find differences across the languages in the average gap between turns, within a range of 250 ms from the cross-language mean. We believe that a natural sensitivity to these tempo differences leads to a subjective perception of dramatic or even fundamental differences as offered in ethnographic reports of conversational style. Our empirical evidence suggests robust human universals in this domain, where local variations are quantitative only, pointing to a single shared infrastructure for language use with likely ethological foundations.
Notes
Cites: Acta Psychol (Amst). 1967;26(1):22-636043092
Cites: Psychon Bull Rev. 2005 Dec;12(6):957-6816615316
Cites: Cognition. 1995 Aug;56(2):165-937554793
Cites: J Child Lang. 1986 Feb;13(1):15-293949895
PubMed ID
19553212 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Duodecim. 1972;88(3):232-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1972

1769 records – page 1 of 177.