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The 3 mm skin prick test (SPT) threshold criterion is not reliable for Tyrophagus putrescentiae: the re-evaluation of SPT criterion to dust mites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71486
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
B. Kanceljak-Macan
J. Macan
D. Plavec
T. Klepac
S. Milkovic-Kraus
Author Affiliation
Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia.
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Comparative Study
Croatia
Cross Reactions - immunology
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Proteins - immunology
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Skin Tests - standards
Urban health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The mean wheal diameter >/= 3 mm is the usual criterion for positive skin prick test (SPT) reaction to dust mites. The study assessed the accuracy of this SPT criterion with respect to specific IgE values of above 0.35 kUA/l (+ sIgE). METHODS: Specific IgE (ImmunoCAP, Pharmacia AB Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden) and standard SPT to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) and farinae (DF), Lepidoglyphus destructor (LD) and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (TP) (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) were performed in a random sample of 457 subjects, of whom 273 men (mean age 35.3 +/- 11.0 years) and 184 women (mean age 37.9 +/- 9.5 years). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test, regression analysis and discriminant analysis. RESULTS: When the mean wheal diameter of >/= 3 mm was considered positive (+ SPT), the correlation between + SPT and + sIgE was 0.47 for DP (P
PubMed ID
12464048 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent prevalence of antibodies cross-reactive to the influenza A(H3N2) variant virus in sera collected in Norway in 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124250
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(19)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
K. Waalen
A. Kilander
S G Dudman
R. Ramos-Ocao
O. Hungnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. kristian.waalen@fhi.no
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(19)
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Viral - blood - immunology
Child, Preschool
Cross Reactions - immunology
Hemagglutination inhibition tests
Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype - immunology - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Influenza, Human - immunology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Antibody cross-reactivity to the influenza A(H3N2) variant virus recently reported in the United States, was investigated in Norwegian sera. Seroprevalence was 40% overall, and 71% in people born between 1977 and 1993. The most susceptible age groups were children and people aged around 50 years. The high immunity in young adults is likely to be due to strong priming infection with similar viruses in the 1990s. More research is needed to explain the poor immunity in 45?54 year-olds.
PubMed ID
22607964 View in PubMed
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An extended study of seroprevalence of anti-Anisakis simplex IgE antibodies in Norwegian blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106211
Source
Scand J Immunol. 2014 Jan;79(1):61-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
A H Lin
I. Nepstad
E. Florvaag
E. Egaas
T. Van Do
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Immunol. 2014 Jan;79(1):61-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anisakis - immunology
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic - blood - immunology
Blood Donors
Cross Reactions - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Fish Diseases - immunology - parasitology
Fishes - immunology - parasitology
Host-Pathogen Interactions - immunology
Humans
Immunoblotting
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Norway - epidemiology
Seafood - parasitology - standards
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
During the last decade, cases of the fish parasite Anisakis simplex infection and allergy in human have increased in countries with high fish consumption. Our aim was to perform an extended seroprevalence study of anti-IgE antibodies against this parasite in Norway, one of the high fish-consuming countries. At the Department of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine and the Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway, two main groups of anonymized serum samples were collected; the first (n = 993) from recently recruited blood donors (designated 'BDO') and the second (n = 414) from patient with total IgE levels =1000 kU/l (designated 'IGE+'). The sera were analysed by the ImmunoCAP(®) method for total IgE and IgE antibodies against A. simplex, house dust mite (HDM), shrimp, cod, crab, brine shrimp and shrimp tropomyosin. The A. simplex positive sera were further tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method, which uses 2 recombinant (r) major allergens, rAni s 1 and rAni s 7 as target antigens. SDS-PAGE and Western immunoblotting analyses were also performed. Whereas the prevalences by ImmunoCAP(®) were 0.4% and 16.2% in the BDO and IGE+ groups, respectively, analyses with recombinant allergens showed only 0.0% and 0.2%. Cross-reactivity and immunoblotting analyses suggested that most of the ImmunoCAP(®) positive sera were probably false-positive due to cross-sensitization to shrimp and HDM. However, positivity due to other A. simplex antigens should also be considered. Compared with other high fish-consuming countries, we observed a very low seroprevalence of anti-Anisakis IgE antibodies in a Norwegian population.
PubMed ID
24219706 View in PubMed
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Assay interference caused by antibodies reacting with rat kappa light-chain in human sera.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132833
Source
J Immunol Methods. 2011 Sep 30;372(1-2):204-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-2011
Author
Søren E Degn
Stig Henrik Andersen
Lisbeth Jensen
Steffen Thiel
Jens C Jensenius
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Aarhus University, Wilhelm Meyers Allé 4, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. sdegn@microbiology.au.dk
Source
J Immunol Methods. 2011 Sep 30;372(1-2):204-8
Date
Sep-30-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Donors
Cohort Studies
Cross Reactions - immunology
Denmark
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay - methods - standards
False Positive Reactions
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - diagnostic use - immunology
Immunoglobulin kappa-Chains - immunology
Mannose-Binding Protein-Associated Serine Proteases - analysis - immunology
Rats
Abstract
The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and its derivatives are powerful tools used in research, in the clinic, and in many other analytical and quality control settings. In general, ELISAs are robust, reproducible and reliable. However, a number of pitfalls of ELISAs have been described over the years. The issue of rheumatoid factor (RF), autoantibodies against the Fc portion of IgG, is well recognized (yet often forgotten), as are problems arising from heterophilic antibodies induced by external antigens that cross-react with self-antigens. A few years ago focus was on human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) concomitant with the increased use of mouse monoclonal antibody therapy, a problem that is now diminishing due to development of humanized antibodies. Issues pertaining to food antigens or environmentally encountered antigens are less recognized. We report a recently encountered example of the latter resulting in interference in a solid-phase sandwich assay. Due to the set-up employing a monoclonal rat IgG for capture and a monoclonal rat IgM for development the interference had to be human antibodies reacting with rat light-chain. Out of 102 Danish Caucasian blood donors we found a prevalence of anti-rat kappa light chain antibodies of close to 40% (39/102, defined as at least 2-fold elevated measurements), with around 6% (6/102) having very high levels (defined as at least 4-fold elevated measurements), yielding significantly higher measurements in the assay designed to measure the complement component MAp19 in serum samples. The interference could be blocked by the addition of rat immunoglobulin to the sample buffer. An individual, who had been followed over time, demonstrated a periodic increase of interfering antibodies, highlighting that it is an independently varying parameter and thereby a variable interference in assays. Our results highlight a major pitfall of potential relevance to many sandwich-type assays, as well as an approach to rectify such problems.
PubMed ID
21771595 View in PubMed
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Autoantibodies against cardiac G-protein-coupled receptors define different populations with cardiomyopathies but not with hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54876
Source
Clin Immunol Immunopathol. 1994 Jul;72(1):15-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
M L Fu
J. Hoebeke
S. Matsui
M. Matoba
Y. Magnusson
T. Hedner
H. Herlitz
A. Hjalmarson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Wallenberg Laboratory, Sahlgren's Hospital, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Clin Immunol Immunopathol. 1994 Jul;72(1):15-20
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Autoantibodies - physiology
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated - immunology
Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic - complications - immunology
Cross Reactions - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
GTP-Binding Proteins - immunology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - immunology
Immunoglobulin Isotypes - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Peptide Fragments - immunology
Rats
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta - immunology
Receptors, Muscarinic - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
It was previously shown that the second extracellular loop of cardiovascular G-protein-coupled receptors is an antigenic target for pharmacologically active autoantibodies in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. To extend these observations to cover patients with the same disease from different geographical origins or to patients with other cardiac diseases, peptides corresponding to the sequences of the second extracellular loops of the human M2 muscarinic receptors and beta adrenoceptors were used as antigens in an enzyme immunoassay. Sera from patients from Sweden and Japan with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, n = 32), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, n = 23), malignant essential hypertension (MEH, n = 11), malignant secondary hypertension (MSH, n = 10), and sera from healthy blood donors (HBD, n = 49) were tested. Sera from patients with DCM recognized the muscarinic receptor peptide in 38% of cases and the beta 1 adrenoceptor peptide in 31% of cases. In 50% of the positive patients, autoantibodies against both peptides coexisted as shown by competition experiments using both peptides as inhibitors. In HCM patients, there was a lower frequency of autoantibodies but with a higher but not significant predominance against the M2 peptide. No autoantibodies were detected in sera from patients with MEH or MSH. Autoantibodies against the M2 muscarinic receptors, affinity-purified from positive patients, displayed pharmacological activity as demonstrated by changes in the affinity and number of radioligand binding sites. In contrast, antibodies purified from positive HBD had no effect. These results confirm that autoantibodies displaying pharmacological activity against G-protein-coupled cardiovascular receptors are mainly restricted to patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and that different autoantibody populations are responsible for the recognition of the different receptors.
PubMed ID
8020188 View in PubMed
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Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2003 Nov;91(5):A6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Richard W Weber
Author Affiliation
National Jewish Medical & Research Center, 1400 Jackson Street Room J326, Denver, CO 80206, USA.
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2003 Nov;91(5):A6
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bassia scoparia - adverse effects - classification - immunology
Canada
Cross Reactions - immunology
Humans
Pollen - adverse effects - immunology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - etiology - immunology
Seasons
PubMed ID
14692422 View in PubMed
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Comparison of clinical significance and allergenic cross-reactivity of storage mites Blomia kulagini and Lepidoglyphus destructor in Sweden and Brazil.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37600
Source
Allergy. 1990 Aug;45(6):409-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
M. van Hage-Hamsten
L. Machado
M T Barros
S G Johansson
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Clinical Immunology, Karolinska Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 1990 Aug;45(6):409-17
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Agriculture
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Brazil
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross Reactions - immunology
Dust - adverse effects
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis - immunology
Middle Aged
Mites - immunology
Questionnaires
Radioallergosorbent Test
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Comparison of the clinical significance and allergenic cross-reactivity of Blomia kulagini (B. kulagini) and Lepidoglyphus destructor (L. destructor) was made on sera from Sweden and Brazil using the radio-allergo-sorbent test (RAST) and the RAST inhibition technique. RAST-positive sera were obtained from 53 allergic Swedish farmers and 31 allergic subjects from Brazil who were positive to B. kulagini and/or L. destructor. B. kulagini was shown to be a common cause of sensitization especially in Brazil. There was a fairly high correlation between positive RAST results to L. destructor and B. kulagini based on sera from both Sweden and Brazil. The highest RAST scores were found against L. destructor in Swedish sera and against B. kulagini in Brazilian sera. The RAST inhibition studies showed that the L. destructor extract was able to inhibit the B. kulagini system (a positive RAST to B. kulagini allergen disc) in Swedish but not in Brazilian sera. In contrast, the B. kulagini extract was only able to inhibit the L. destructor system in sera from Brazil and not in sera from Sweden. This study shows that results obtained with RAST inhibition are not entirely dependent on the overall specificity of the IgE antibodies in the patient's sera, since the more subtle specificity of the primarily sensitizing allergen will dominate. Thus, conclusions drawn regarding allergenic cross-reactivity are dependent on the populations tested, and conclusions on the existence or absence of cross-reactivity, e.g. between two species of mites may be contradictory.
PubMed ID
2244671 View in PubMed
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Comparison of three different methods for detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in a tertiary pediatric care center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118725
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2013 Feb;51(2):481-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Emilie Vallières
Maude Saint-Jean
Fabien Rallu
Author Affiliation
Département de Microbiologie et Immunologie, CHU Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. emilievallieres@gmail.com
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2013 Feb;51(2):481-6
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bacteriological Techniques - methods
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross Reactions - immunology
Escherichia coli Infections - diagnosis
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - diagnosis
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Molecular Typing
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Serotyping
Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli - classification - genetics - immunology
Tertiary Care Centers
Abstract
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a well-known cause of sporadic and epidemic food-borne gastroenteritis. A low infectious dose, approximately 10 microorganisms, is sufficient to cause disease that may lead to hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The objective of this study was to compare the performances of an in-house real-time PCR, a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Premier EHEC; Meridian Bioscience), and culture on sorbitol MacConkey agar for the detection of STEC in a tertiary care pediatric hospital. Of 632 stool samples tested, 21 were positive for STEC. All were detected by PCR, 6 were detected by EIA, and only 5 O157 STEC isolates were identified by culture. Among the 15 specimens falsely negative by EIA, there were 9 Stx1, 2 Stx2, and 4 Stx1 and Stx2 STEC isolates. The latter group included 2 O157 STEC isolates that would have been missed if only EIA had been performed. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study performed in a pediatric hospital which demonstrates the superiority of PCR over EIA for the detection of STEC. We conclude that PCR is specific and more sensitive than EIA. PCR should be considered for routine use in clinical settings where molecular detection facilities are available. Its lower limit of detection, equivalent to the infectious dose, is an obvious advantage for patient care and public health surveillance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23175264 View in PubMed
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Cross-reactive antibody to swine influenza A(H3N2) subtype virus in children and adults before and after immunisation with 2010/11 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in Canada, August to November 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127415
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
D M Skowronski
G. De Serres
N Z Janjua
J L Gardy
V. Gilca
M. Dionne
M E Hamelin
C. Rhéaume
G. Boivin
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, Canada. danuta.skowronski@@bccdc.ca
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(4)
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - biosynthesis - metabolism
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross Reactions - immunology
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - immunology - therapeutic use
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Swine
Vaccines, Inactivated - immunology - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
In pre- and post-immunisation sera from children (17-120 months-old) and adults (20-59 years-old) immunised with 2010/11 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine, we assessed age-related patterns of sero-susceptibility and vaccine-induced cross-reactive antibodies to a representative swine H3N2 (swH3N2) and a related ancestral human H3N2 (A/Sydney/5/1997) influenza virus. Few children but a greater proportion of adults showed pre-immunisation haemagglutination inhibition titres =40 to either virus. Titres increased with age among children but decreased in adults. Fewer than 20% showed a four-fold rise in antibody titres to either virus following immunisation. Further investigation is warranted to guide ongoing risk assessment and response to emerging swine H3N2 viruses.
PubMed ID
22297136 View in PubMed
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Cross-reactivity of IgE-binding components between boiled Atlantic shrimp and German cockroach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15889
Source
Allergy. 1995 Nov;50(11):918-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
J F Crespo
C. Pascual
R. Helm
S. Sanchez-Pastor
I. Ojeda
L. Romualdo
M. Martin-Esteban
J A Ojeda
Author Affiliation
Allergy Division, La Paz Children's Hospital, Madrid, Spain.
Source
Allergy. 1995 Nov;50(11):918-24
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Cockroaches - immunology
Cross Reactions - immunology
Decapoda (Crustacea) - immunology
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Food Hypersensitivity - immunology
Humans
Immunoblotting
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Molecular Weight
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
IgE-antibody reactivity to boiled Atlantic shrimp (Pandalus borealis) and German cockroach (Blattella germanica) of sera from 89 patients, sensitive to one or the other, was investigated with an enzymatic immunoassay for specific IgE detection (CAP-FEIA System, Pharmacia, Sweden). IgE serum levels to both antishrimp and anticockroach allergens were found to be positive in 76 of the 89 (85.4%) tested sera. A positive anticockroach IgE was very rare in the absence of detectable antishrimp IgE (five of 89 sera). Linear regression analysis on antishrimp and anti-German cockroach IgE levels-log plot revealed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.73. Inhibition experiments showed that boiled Atlantic shrimp extract inhibited CAP with German cockroach, and vice versa. Immunoblotting showed the strongest IgE binding for both allergenic extracts between 30 and 43 kDa. By blot inhibition, the binding capacity of German cockroach was totally abolished by Atlantic shrimp extract, while German cockroach extract only partially IgE binding to Atlantic shrimp. Cross-reactivity exists between shrimp, an important food allergen, and German cockroach, which has an increasing role in allergic asthma. It could be important to determine the clinical significance of cross-allergy to both allergens, in which exposures occur in different ways.
PubMed ID
8748725 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.