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157 records – page 1 of 16.

The 3 mm skin prick test (SPT) threshold criterion is not reliable for Tyrophagus putrescentiae: the re-evaluation of SPT criterion to dust mites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71486
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
B. Kanceljak-Macan
J. Macan
D. Plavec
T. Klepac
S. Milkovic-Kraus
Author Affiliation
Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia.
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Comparative Study
Croatia
Cross Reactions - immunology
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Proteins - immunology
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Skin Tests - standards
Urban health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The mean wheal diameter >/= 3 mm is the usual criterion for positive skin prick test (SPT) reaction to dust mites. The study assessed the accuracy of this SPT criterion with respect to specific IgE values of above 0.35 kUA/l (+ sIgE). METHODS: Specific IgE (ImmunoCAP, Pharmacia AB Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden) and standard SPT to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) and farinae (DF), Lepidoglyphus destructor (LD) and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (TP) (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) were performed in a random sample of 457 subjects, of whom 273 men (mean age 35.3 +/- 11.0 years) and 184 women (mean age 37.9 +/- 9.5 years). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test, regression analysis and discriminant analysis. RESULTS: When the mean wheal diameter of >/= 3 mm was considered positive (+ SPT), the correlation between + SPT and + sIgE was 0.47 for DP (P
PubMed ID
12464048 View in PubMed
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A 10-year review of p-phenylenediamine allergy and related para-amino compounds at the Ottawa Patch Test Clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123867
Source
Dermatitis. 2011 Nov-Dec;22(6):332-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lauren LaBerge
Melanie Pratt
Bensun Fong
Genevieve Gavigan
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Ottawa, 1053 Carling Ave., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. lfratesi@hotmail.com
Source
Dermatitis. 2011 Nov-Dec;22(6):332-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Aminobenzoic Acid - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Amines - adverse effects
Azo Compounds - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Coloring Agents - adverse effects
Cross Reactions
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hair Dyes - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Patch Tests
Phenylenediamines - adverse effects
Sulfonamides - adverse effects
Textiles
Time Factors
Abstract
p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is an important allergen; 5.0% of patients tested positive to PPD when patch-tested, according to the North American Contact Dermatitis Group. Hair dyes are the main source of exposure.
To assess the significance of PPD allergy at the Ottawa Patch Test Clinic.
We assessed the epidemiology of PPD allergies and determined the cross-reactivity with other para-amino compounds. Charts of patients visiting the Ottawa Patch Test Clinic between May 1997 and July 2009 were reviewed.
One hundred thirty-four patients were found to have a contact allergy to PPD; 75.4% were female, 24.6% were male, 13.4% were hairdressers, 18.7% had a history of atopy, 90.3% were sensitized by hair dye, 2.2% were sensitized by henna tattoos, and 7.5% were sensitized by other sources. Positive patch-test reactions to textile dyes were seen in 24.6%, 7.5% reacted to benzocaine, 6.0% reacted to sulfa drugs, 1.5% reacted to isopropyl-para-phenylenediamine, and 1.5% reacted to para-aminobenzoic acid.
PPD is an important source of allergic contact allergy. Our results show a significant relationship of PPD with other related para-amino compounds.
PubMed ID
22653006 View in PubMed
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[Acute enterovirus uveitis in infants]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29564
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2005 May-Jun;50(3):36-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
V A Lashkevich
G A Koroleva
A N Lukashev
E V Denisova
L A Katargina
I P Khoroshilova-Maslova
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2005 May-Jun;50(3):36-45
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Cataract - etiology
Cross Reactions
Disease Models, Animal
Disease Outbreaks
Echovirus Infections - blood - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
English Abstract
Enterovirus B, Human - genetics - immunology
Epidemiology, Molecular
Eye - virology
Glaucoma - etiology
Humans
Infant
Iris - pathology
Neutralization Tests
Phylogeny
Primates
Pupil Disorders
RNA, Viral - genetics
Russia - epidemiology
Uveitis - blood - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vision Disorders - etiology
Abstract
Enterovirus uveitis (EU) is a new infant eye disease that was first detected and identified in Russia in 1980-1981. Three subtypes of human echoviruses (EV19K, EV11A, and EV11/B) caused 5 nosocomial outbreaks of EU in different Siberian cities and towns in 1980-1989, by affecting more than 750 children mainly below one year of age. Sporadic and focal EU cases (more than 200) were also retrospectively diagnosed in other regions of Russia and in different countries of the former Soviet Union. There were following clinical manifestations: common symptoms of the infection; acute uveitis (rapid focal iridic destruction, pupillary deformities, formation of membranes in the anterior chamber of the eye); and in 15-30% of cases severe complications, cataract, glaucoma, vision impairments. Uveitis strains EV19 and EV11 caused significant uveitis in primates after inoculation into the anterior chamber of the eye, as well as sepsis-like fatal disease with liver necrosis after venous infection. The uveitis strains are phylogenetically and pathogenetically close for primates to strains EV19 and EV11 isolated from young children with sepsis-like disease. The contents of this review have been published in the Reviews in Medical Virology, 2004, vol. 14, p. 241-254.
PubMed ID
16078433 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin levels measured in dried blood spot samples from neonates born small and appropriate for gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162263
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2007 Aug;157(2):189-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
A. Klamer
K. Skogstrand
D M Hougaard
B. Nørgaard-Petersen
A. Juul
G. Greisen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neonatology (section 5021), National University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. anja.klamer@rh.dk
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2007 Aug;157(2):189-94
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Cross Reactions - physiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - blood
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - blood
Male
Maternal Age
Abstract
Adiponectin levels measured in neonatal dried blood spot samples (DBSS) might be affected by both prematurity and being born small for gestational age (SGA). The aim of the study was to measure adiponectin levels in routinely collected neonatal DBSS taken on day 5 (range 3-12) postnatal from infants.
A retrospective case-control study.
One hundred and twenty-two infants: 62 very premature (34 SGA) and 60 mature infants (27 SGA). Adiponectin concentrations were determined in stored neonatal DBSS using a sandwich immunoassay based on flow metric Luminex xMap technology.
Adiponectin was measurable in all samples, and repeated measurements correlated significantly (r = 0.94). Adiponectin concentrations were negatively associated with both SGA (B = -0.283, P = 0.04) and prematurity (B = -2.194, P
PubMed ID
17656597 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent prevalence of antibodies cross-reactive to the influenza A(H3N2) variant virus in sera collected in Norway in 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124250
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(19)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
K. Waalen
A. Kilander
S G Dudman
R. Ramos-Ocao
O. Hungnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. kristian.waalen@fhi.no
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(19)
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Viral - blood - immunology
Child, Preschool
Cross Reactions - immunology
Hemagglutination inhibition tests
Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype - immunology - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Influenza, Human - immunology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Antibody cross-reactivity to the influenza A(H3N2) variant virus recently reported in the United States, was investigated in Norwegian sera. Seroprevalence was 40% overall, and 71% in people born between 1977 and 1993. The most susceptible age groups were children and people aged around 50 years. The high immunity in young adults is likely to be due to strong priming infection with similar viruses in the 1990s. More research is needed to explain the poor immunity in 45?54 year-olds.
PubMed ID
22607964 View in PubMed
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Allergenic crossreactivity between Lepidoglyphus destructor and Blomia tropicalis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15793
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Jun;27(6):691-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
E. Johansson
M. Schmidt
S G Johansson
L. Machado
S. Olsson
M. van Hage-Hamsten
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Jun;27(6):691-9
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - analysis - immunology
Animals
Asthma - immunology
Conjunctivitis - immunology
Cross Reactions
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - metabolism
Insect Proteins - immunology
Mites - immunology
Molecular Weight
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - immunology
Species Specificity
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In general, the non-pyroglyphid mites Lepidoglyphus destructor and Blomia tropicalis show a different geographical distribution. Allergic sensitization to both species have been demonstrated in several investigations. However, whether this reflects cross-reactivity or dual sensitization is so far not known. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the allergenicity and allergenic crossreactivity of L. destructor and B. tropicalis using sera from Sweden and Brazil. METHODS: Allergens in extracts of L. destructor and B. tropicalis were identified with SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting and the crossreactivity was studied by an immunoblot inhibition method. In addition to mite extracts, a recombinant major allergen of L. destructor, Lep d 2, was used. RESULTS: The extract prepared from L. destructor contained 21 IgE-binding components when using the Swedish or the Brazilian sera. A 15 kDa allergen was recognized by 85% of the Swedish sera and 78% of the Brazilian. The B. tropicalis extract exposed 23 IgE-binding components when the Brazilian sera were used and 19 when the Swedish sera were used. A total of 83% of the Brazilian sera and 80% of the Swedish sera identified a 14.5 kDa allergen. The IgE response of the Swedish serum pool to 10 B. tropicalis allergens was inhibited by L. destructor extract. Likewise, the response of the Brazilian serum pool to four different L. destructor allergens was inhibited by B. tropicalis extract. The recombinant Lep d 2 allergen inhibited 33% of the IgE binding of the Swedish serum pool to the 14.5 kDa allergen in the B. tropicalis extract. CONCLUSION: Crossreactivity with several proteins from L. destructor and B. tropicalis was demonstrated. The results suggest that a B. tropicalis 14.5 kDa allergen is antigenically crossreactive with recombinant L. destructor allergen Lep d 2.
PubMed ID
9208191 View in PubMed
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Allergic patch test reactions to palladium chloride in schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213396
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1996 Jan;34(1):39-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
L. Kanerva
H. Kerosuo
A. Kullaa
E. Kerosuo
Author Affiliation
Section of Dermatology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1996 Jan;34(1):39-42
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cross Reactions
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Nickel - adverse effects
Palladium - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Prevalence
Schools
Students
Abstract
A study of the prevalence of allergic patch test reactions to palladium chloride compared to nickel sulfate was performed in a group of Finnish schoolchildren. All adolescents 14-18 years of age in a Finnish town with 40,000 inhabitants, who had received orthodontic treatment with metallic appliances at a municipal dental clinic, were included in the study. The selection of patients was based on patient records. A non-treatment control group was randomly selected from the same age groups of the town population. A total of 700 subjects (77% of those invited), 417 (60%) girls and 283 (40%) boys, participated. The majority (91%) of the girls had pierced ears. Orthodontic treatment was equally common (67-70%) in the boys and the girls. The girls had a much higher frequency of allergic patch test reactions to both nickel sulfate and palladium chloride. Of the 700 adolescents tested, 48 (7%) had an allergic patch test reaction to palladium chloride. Of the 417 girls, 44 (11%) were palladium-chloride-positive, whereas only 4 of the 283 boys tested (1%) had an allergic patch test reaction to palladium chloride. 3 patients reacted to palladium chloride only, whereas all other patients with allergic patch test reactions to palladium chloride also had an allergic patch test reaction to nickel sulfate. The results support the concept of cross-reactivity between nickel sulfate and palladium chloride. The clinical significance of the allergic patch test reactions caused by palladium chloride remains unclear.
PubMed ID
8789224 View in PubMed
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Analysis of immunogenic properties of nonapeptide TVGRGDPHQ from Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57705
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1994 Mar-Apr;66(2):90-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
E M Kavoon
E G Pkhakadze
A V Marinets
V A Chechot
J L Radavsky
S V Komissarenko
Author Affiliation
A.V. Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1994 Mar-Apr;66(2):90-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Antibody Specificity
Bordetella pertussis - chemistry
Cross Reactions
Hemagglutinins
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Mice, Inbred CBA
Molecular Sequence Data
Oligopeptides - chemistry - immunology
Serum Albumin, Bovine - chemistry
Abstract
Immunogenic properties of TVGRGDPHQ nonapeptide which is correspondent to the region 1094-1102 of B. pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) were studied. The conjugate of bovine serum albumin with nonapeptide was used for immunization of BALB/c and CBA mice. Antisera of the both lines of mice cross-reacted with a number of antigens, but using affinity chromatography peptide and FHA specific antibodies were extracted. Affinity purified rabbit antibodies to TVGRGPHQ which recognize FHA were also obtained. Therefore the antibodies to the peptide which placed RGD-containing region responsible for macrophage CR3-integrin interaction are capable to distinguish the native antigen. Thus these data are an additional evidence for the nonapeptide use as a component of synthetic vaccine against whooping-cough.
PubMed ID
7998347 View in PubMed
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An antibody to recombinant crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone of Nephrops norvegicus cross-reacts with neuroendocrine organs of several taxa of malacostracan Crustacea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50785
Source
Cell Tissue Res. 2002 Feb;307(2):243-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
P G Giulianini
N. Pandolfelli
S. Lorenzon
E A Ferrero
P. Edomi
Author Affiliation
BRAIN Centre for Neuroscience, Department of Biology, University of Trieste, via Licio Giorgieri 7, 34127 Trieste, Italy. giuliani@univ.trieste.it
Source
Cell Tissue Res. 2002 Feb;307(2):243-54
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies - metabolism
Antibody Specificity
Astacoidea - metabolism
Biological Assay
Comparative Study
Cross Reactions
Crustacea - metabolism
Decapoda (Crustacea) - metabolism
Endocrine Glands - physiology
Eye - chemistry - ultrastructure
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Invertebrate Hormones - immunology
Nephropidae - metabolism
Nerve Tissue Proteins - immunology
Neurons - ultrastructure
Rabbits - immunology
Recombinant Proteins - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Species Specificity
Abstract
The crustacean hyperglycaemic hormones (cHHs) are multifunctional neuropeptides that play a central role in the physiology of crustaceans. A partial cDNA coding for cHH of the Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus, was cloned; this cDNA was fused to glutathione- S-transferase (GST) to obtain a recombinant fusion protein that was used to raise a rabbit antiserum and to perform a biological assay. The specificity of the purified antibody was demonstrated by means of Western blotting. To validate the specificity of the purified antibody to the cHH of N. norvegicus and its cross-reactivity with other species, we performed standard immunocytochemistry of the eyestalk on: (1) paraffin sections of the decapod species N. norvegicus, Munida rugosa and Astacus leptodactylus and of the stomatopod Squilla mantis; (2) semithin resin sections of N. norvegicus and Palaemon elegans; (3) ultrathin sections of N. norvegicus sinus gland (transmission electron microscopy studies). The pattern of immunoreactivity shown by N. norvegicus eyestalk sections conforms to distribution, relative amount and ultrastructural features of cHH-containing neurons and nerve endings as reported in the previous literature. In all the crustacean species examined, the antibody marks precisely the X organ-sinus gland complex and unspecific staining is completely lacking. In addition, its specific cross-reaction by immunoprecipitation depletes shrimp eyestalk extract of hyperglycaemic activity in an in vivo bioassay. The results obtained show a cHH-specific molecular recognition despite the fact that the species tested belong to systematic groups increasingly remote in the phylogenetic tree. The antibody could be used for advancing our knowledge on cHH activity in a variety of crustacean species, e.g. for monitoring reproductive and stress conditions.
PubMed ID
11845331 View in PubMed
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An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of IgG and IgM antibodies to human herpesvirus type 6.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221596
Source
J Virol Methods. 1993 Mar;41(3):265-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
C A Parker
J M Weber
Author Affiliation
Surveillance, Influenza and Viral Exanthemata Section, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
J Virol Methods. 1993 Mar;41(3):265-75
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antigens, Viral - blood
Binding, Competitive
Canada - epidemiology
Cell Line
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross Reactions
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay - methods
Female
Herpesviridae Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Herpesvirus 6, Human - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
A lysate of human herpesvirus type 6 (HHV6) infected HSB2 cells was used as antigen for an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of IgG and IgM antibody to HHV6. 78 clinical samples were tested for the presence of HHV6-specific IgM. Nine specimens, all from children under 4.5 years of age, were found to be reactive indicating probable acute infection with HHV6. Sera from 12 healthy adult blood donors and from 88 of 90 adults over the age of 35 with unspecified health conditions tested negative for HHV6 IgM, indicating a minimum specificity estimate of nearly 98% in these patients. Cross-reactivity of antibody to other herpes viruses with the HHV6 ELISA antigen was not detected. Six hundred and ninety-six serum samples from individuals of different age groups were examined for IgG antibody status. In 94% of these samples, IgG antibody was detected. Our data suggests that most Canadians possess antibody to HHV6 by 1 yr of age and that on average, antibody levels remain high through early adulthood but begin to decline with advancing age. The ELISA described is a reliable test for the measurement of IgG and IgM antibodies for both clinical diagnosis and epidemiological studies.
PubMed ID
8386179 View in PubMed
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157 records – page 1 of 16.