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252 records – page 1 of 26.

Acceptability of a wearable hand hygiene device with monitoring capabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155144
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2008 Nov;70(3):216-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
V M Boscart
K S McGilton
A. Levchenko
G. Hufton
P. Holliday
G R Fernie
Author Affiliation
Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. boscart.veronique@torontorehab.on.ca
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2008 Nov;70(3):216-22
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Electronics
Female
Focus Groups
Gels - administration & dosage
Hand Disinfection
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Infection Control - instrumentation - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Reminder Systems - instrumentation
Abstract
Transmisssion of infection within healthcare institutions is a significant threat to patients and staff. One of the most effective means of prevention is good hand hygiene. A research team at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Ontario, Canada, developed a wearable hand disinfection system with monitoring capabilities to enhance hand wash frequency. We present the findingsof the first phase of a larger study addressing the hypothesis that an electronic hand hygiene system with monitoring and reminding propertieswill increase hand hygiene compliance. This first phase focused on the acceptability and usability of the wearable electronic hand wash device ina clinical environment. The feedback from healthcare staff to the first prototype has provided evidence for the research team to continue with the development of this technology.
Notes
Erratum In: J Hosp Infect. 2009 Apr;71(4):389
PubMed ID
18799234 View in PubMed
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Adoption of guidelines for Universal Precautions and Body Substance Isolation in Canadian acute-care hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228464
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1990 Sep;11(9):465-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1990
Author
D. Birnbaum
M. Schulzer
R G Mathias
M. Kelly
A W Chow
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1990 Sep;11(9):465-72
Date
Sep-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Fluids
Canada
Communicable Disease Control - economics - methods
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Hospital Bed Capacity
Hospitals
Humans
Questionnaires
Abstract
The impact of recently recommended hospital infection control guidelines on Canadian acute-care hospitals is unknown. A confidential cross-sectional mailed survey of all acute-care Canadian hospitals was conducted to determine rates of receipt and adoption of published guidelines for Universal Precautions (UP) or Body Substance Isolation (BSI), rationale for adoption and knowledge of costs and benefits. Five hundred and seventy-nine of 943 sites (61%) responded (exceeding 80% in urban centers); 94% among hospitals with at least 300 beds and 57% among those under 300 beds. Seventy-four percent of responders claimed adoption of UP (65%) or BSI (9%), staff protection being their primary motivation. Adoption of either UP or BSI was associated with size (p less than .001), increasing progressively from 45% in the smallest group (less than 25 beds) to 84% in the largest (greater than or equal to 500 beds). Many hospitals introduced modifications and some substituted names other than UP or BSI in adopting a new strategy. In practice, UP and BSI now mean different things in different hospitals, and the distinction between them has become blurred. Furthermore, only 5% claiming adoption of a new strategy adopted all of the fundamental policies expected under UP or BSI. Receipt of guidelines was also correlated with size: one-third of hospitals under 200 beds had not received key publications defining UP and BSI. Only 19% claiming adoption of a new strategy indicated knowledge of cost implications. These results suggest a need for closer collaboration among hospitals and government agencies in developing uniform infection control policies, and for systematic evaluation of the cost and effectiveness of new strategies.
Notes
Comment In: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1991 Mar;12(3):139-402022855
PubMed ID
2230049 View in PubMed
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AIDS: medicolegal considerations for Canadian hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236294
Source
CMAJ. 1986 Nov 15;135(10):1091-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1986
Author
B J Johnson
C L Soskolne
Source
CMAJ. 1986 Nov 15;135(10):1091-6
Date
Nov-15-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - immunology - transmission
Antibodies, Viral - immunology
Blood Transfusion
Canada
Confidentiality
Contract Services
Cross Infection - prevention & control
HIV Antibodies
Hospital Administration
Hospitals - standards
Humans
Informed consent
Insemination, Artificial
Jurisprudence
Patient Advocacy
Patient compliance
Abstract
Given the increasing endemicity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent implicated in the causation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), in numerous sizeable subgroups of society, hospitals can expect increasing exposure to the legal implications presented by patients with AIDS. This paper reviews the duty of care owed by hospitals, both directly, through contractual obligations, and indirectly, through the acts of their employees and private contractors, to patients with AIDS, other patients and the public. Owing to the absence of case law directly related to AIDS or to HIV antibody reactivity, inferences were drawn from precedents set with other infectious diseases. Recommendations are made in the areas of confidentiality, informed consent, standards of care and vicarious liability.
Notes
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PubMed ID
3464340 View in PubMed
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An emergency medical services transfer authorization center in response to the Toronto severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180825
Source
Prehosp Emerg Care. 2004 Apr-Jun;8(2):223-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
Russell D MacDonald
Bruce Farr
Michael Neill
John Loch
Bruce Sawadsky
Chris Mazza
Karim Daya
Chris Olynyk
Sandra Chad
Author Affiliation
Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. rmacdonald@bassehospital.on.ca
Source
Prehosp Emerg Care. 2004 Apr-Jun;8(2):223-31
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Transmission, Infectious - prevention & control
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Humans
Needs Assessment
Ontario - epidemiology
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology - transmission
Transfer Agreement
Abstract
To describe the rapid development and implementation of an innovative emergency medical services (EMS) command, control, and tracking system to mitigate the risk of iatrogenic spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among health care facilities, health care workers, and patients in Ontario, Canada, as a result of interfacility patient transfers.
A working group of stakeholders in health care and transport medicine developed and implemented a medically based command, control, and tracking center for all interfacility (including acute and long-term care) patient transfers in Ontario, Canada. Development and implementation took place in three distinct but overlapping phases: needs assessment, design and implementation, and expansion and ongoing operations.
The needs assessment, design, and implementation were completed in less than 48 hours using existing EMS infrastructure and personnel. The center was successfully handling more than 500 requests for interfacility patient transfer per day within 36 hours of operation and more than 1,100 requests per day within two weeks. Expansion into a new physical space enables 40 staff to process up to 1,500 requests per day. There was no reported spread of SARS resulting from interfacility patient transfers since the center began operation on April 1, 2003, and anecdotal evidence demonstrates it identified up to 13 new SARS cases. The center continues to operate as a part of Ontario's commitment as a result of diligence in transport medicine and infection control, even though no new cases of SARS were reported since June 12, 2003. Further study is needed to determine its overall efficacy at risk mitigation.
Rapid establishment of an EMS-based command, control, and tracking center is possible in the setting of a public health emergency. In addition to risk mitigation, this type of center could provide syndromic surveillance in real time and provide the earliest indication of a potential threat to public health in acute and long-term care facilities.
PubMed ID
15060861 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1994 Feb;60(2):89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994

[Antibiotic resistance--a challenge for hospital hygiene work].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205815
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 20;118(8):1173
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1998
Author
O. Scheel
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 20;118(8):1173
Date
Mar-20-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Disease Notification
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
9567689 View in PubMed
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Antimicrobial resistance: the threat to health and health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202075
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur Inc Leadersh Health Serv. 1998;11(6-7):viii-xi
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
K. Granitto
Author Affiliation
Chelsey Park Nursing Home, Streetville, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur Inc Leadersh Health Serv. 1998;11(6-7):viii-xi
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Canada
Communicable disease control
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Guidelines as Topic
Hospitals
Humans
Nursing Homes
Pneumococcal Infections - drug therapy
Streptococcus pneumoniae - drug effects - pathogenicity
World Health
Abstract
This article addresses antimicrobial resistance and the threat it poses to an individual's health and the health care system. Diseases, such as pneumococcus have gained an overabundance of antimicrobial resistance. In addition, previously unknown diseases are surging and sounding alarm bells worldwide. The history and causes of this surge are examined globally. One such cause is the overuse of antibiotics in long-term care facilities. International strategies that have been implemented by organizations, such as the World Health Organization, to control the spread of infectious diseases, are also reviewed. The prevalence, causes and consequences of antibiotic resistant organisms, are found in long-term care facilities and hospitals specifically in Canada, are reviewed. Recommendations are made.
PubMed ID
10339088 View in PubMed
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252 records – page 1 of 26.