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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Beyond the bundle: a survey of central line-associated bloodstream infection prevention practices used in US and Canadian pediatric hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106770
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2013 Nov;34(11):1208-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Sarah B Klieger
Gail Potter-Bynoe
Caroline Quach
Thomas J Sandora
Susan E Coffin
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases and Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2013 Nov;34(11):1208-10
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antisepsis
Canada
Catheterization, Central Venous - adverse effects
Cross Infection - etiology - prevention & control
Data Collection
Disinfection
Equipment Contamination - prevention & control
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infection Control - methods
Sepsis - etiology - prevention & control
United States
Abstract
We surveyed US and Canadian pediatric hospitals about their use of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) prevention strategies beyond typical insertion and maintenance bundles. We found wide variation in supplemental strategies across hospitals and in their penetration within hospitals. Future studies should assess specific adjunctive prevention strategies and CLABSI rates.
PubMed ID
24113607 View in PubMed
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Colonization of hospital water systems by legionellae, mycobacteria and other heterotrophic bacteria potentially hazardous to risk group patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184262
Source
APMIS. 2003 May;111(5):546-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Jaana Kusnetsov
Eila Torvinen
Outi Perola
Tapio Nousiainen
Marja-Leena Katila
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland. Jaana.Kusnetsov@ktl.fi
Source
APMIS. 2003 May;111(5):546-56
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Baths
Colony Count, Microbial
Cross Infection - etiology - prevention & control
Disinfection
Finland
Hospitals
Humans
Legionella - growth & development - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Legionellosis - etiology - prevention & control
Mycobacterium - growth & development - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Mycobacterium Infections - etiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Temperature
Water Microbiology
Water supply
Abstract
Occurrences of legionellae and nontuberculous mycobacteria were followed in water systems of a tertiary care hospital where nosocomial infections due to the two genera had been verified. The aim was to examine whether their occurrence in the circulating hot water can be controlled by addition of a heat-shock unit in the circulation system, and by intensified cleaning of the tap and shower heads. One hot water system examined had an inbuilt heat-shock system causing a temporary increase of temperature to 80 degrees C, the other was an ordinary system (60 degrees C). The heat-shock unit decreased legionella colony counts in the circulating hot water (mean 35 cfu/l) compared to the ordinary system (mean 3.6 x 10(3) cfu/l). Mycobacteria constantly present in the incoming cold water (mean 260 cfu/l) were never isolated from the circulating hot water. Water sampled at peripheral sites such as taps and showers contained higher concentrations of legionellae, mycobacteria, and mesophilic and Gram-negative heterotrophs than the circulating waters. The shower water samples contained the highest bacterial loads. The results indicate the need to develop more efficient prevention methods than the ones presently used. Prevention of mycobacteria should also be extended to incoming cold water.
PubMed ID
12887506 View in PubMed
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[Hospital hygiene and the medicosocial problems of preserving human health in medical institutions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214862
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1995 Jul;(7):55-60, 80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
A V Znamenskii
B I Zholus
N F Koshelev
V N Mesniankin
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1995 Jul;(7):55-60, 80
Date
Jul-1995
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection - etiology - prevention & control
Environmental Microbiology
Humans
Hygiene
Infection Control
Russia
Abstract
The article contains data concerning nosocomial malady and the efficiency of preventive measures. The authors analyse the reasons and the conditions of the increase of hospital-acquired diseases, and show the significance of hospital hygiene.
PubMed ID
7571515 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patterns of handwashing behavior and visits to patients on a general medical ward of healthcare workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180792
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Mar;25(3):198-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Janet Raboud
Refik Saskin
Kurt Wong
Christine Moore
Grace Parucha
Jocelyn Bennett
Karen Green
Don Low
Mark Loeb
Andy Simor
Allison McGeer
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto and the University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Mar;25(3):198-202
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Fluids - microbiology
Cross Infection - etiology - prevention & control
Equipment Contamination
Gloves, Protective - utilization
Guideline Adherence
Hand - microbiology
Hand Disinfection - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infection Control - standards
Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient
Logistic Models
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Patients' Rooms
Personnel, Hospital - psychology - standards
Risk assessment
Skin - microbiology
Abstract
To obtain accurate data regarding the handwashing behavior and patterns of visits to patients by healthcare workers (HCWs).
All visits by HCWs to selected patient rooms were recorded for 3 days and 2 nights. Additionally, 5 nurses were observed for 1 day each and 2 nurses were observed for 1 night each. Nurses were observed for their entire shifts and all of their activities were recorded.
A general medical ward in a tertiary-care hospital.
Convenience samples of HCWs and patients.
Patients were visited every 25 minutes on average. Monitoring rooms and observing nurses resulted in similar rates of patient visits. The highest level of risk was contact with body fluids in 11% of visits and skin in 40% of visits. The overall rate of handwashing was 46%; however, the rate was higher for visits involving contact with body fluids (81%) and skin (61%). Nurses returned immediately to the same patient 45% of the time. The rate of handwashing was higher for the last of a series of visits to a patient's room (53% vs 30%, P
Notes
Comment In: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Mar;25(3):187-815061406
PubMed ID
15061409 View in PubMed
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Prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia: current practice in Canadian intensive care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188429
Source
J Crit Care. 2002 Sep;17(3):161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Daren K Heyland
Deborah J Cook
Peter M Dodek
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. dkh2@post.queensu.ca
Source
J Crit Care. 2002 Sep;17(3):161-7
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cross Infection - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Infection control - methods - standards
Intensive Care - methods - standards
Intensive Care Units
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Pneumonia - etiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Respiration, Artificial - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To evaluate the current use of strategies to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and to identify interventions to target for quality-improvement initiatives.
Cross-sectional national survey.
Canadian intensive care units (ICUs) with at least 8 beds.
Seven hundred and two patients in 66 ICUs in 10 provinces in Canada.
None.
The Canadian Critical Care Trials Group recently developed VAP prevention guidelines. Before these guidelines were disseminated, we documented the extent to which these recommendations were followed in practice by using 3 methods: survey of ICU directors, prospective observation of patients on one day, and retrospective review of patient charts for a 12-day period. According to ICU directors, ventilator circuits were changed only for new patients or if the circuit was soiled in 7 of 66 ICUs (10%), heat and moisture exchangers were used routinely in 53 of 66 ICUs (80%), and closed-suction catheter systems were used in 58 of 66 ICUs (88%). Neither subglottic secretion drainage tubes nor prophylactic antibiotics for VAP were used at all. Of the entire cohort of 702 patients, the average degree of elevation of the head of the bed was 29.9 degrees (range, 0 degrees -90 degrees ) and 22 of 702 (3.1%) were observed to be on a kinetic bed. Of the 459 patients receiving any form of mechanical ventilation, 56 (12.2%) were receiving noninvasive or mask ventilation, 262 (57.1%) were orally intubated, 9 (1.9%) were nasally intubated, and 132 (28.8%) had received a tracheostomy. Of the 423 patients who received nutrition support, 373 (88.2%) received enteral nutrition. Small bowel feeding tubes were used during 16.4% of study days on enteral feeds and sucralfate was prescribed for 1.7% of study days.
Significant opportunities exist to improve VAP prevention practices in Canada. These strategies include decreasing the frequency of ventilator circuit changes, and increasing the use of non-invasive ventilation, subglottic secretion drainage endotracheal tubes, kinetic bed therapy, small bowel feedings, and elevation of the head of the bed.
PubMed ID
12297991 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Role of modern factors in the interaction between men and microorganisms. Importance of the national health system for prophylaxis and treatment of infectious diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195714
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2000 Nov-Dec;(6):3-6
Publication Type
Article

Screening for nosocomial legionellosis by culture of the water supply and targeting of high-risk patients for specialized laboratory testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226560
Source
Am J Infect Control. 1991 Apr;19(2):63-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991

Synergistic effects of Candida and Escherichia coli on gut barrier function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199939
Source
J Trauma. 1999 Dec;47(6):1045-50; discussion 1050-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
L N Diebel
D M Liberati
C A Diglio
S A Dulchavsky
W J Brown
Author Affiliation
Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA.
Source
J Trauma. 1999 Dec;47(6):1045-50; discussion 1050-1
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Translocation - physiology
Caco-2 Cells
Candida albicans - physiology
Candidiasis - etiology - prevention & control
Cell Culture Techniques - methods
Colony Count, Microbial
Critical Illness
Cross Infection - etiology - prevention & control
Culture Media
Electric Impedance
Escherichia coli - physiology
Escherichia coli Infections - etiology - prevention & control
Gastric Mucosa - immunology - microbiology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A, Secretory - immunology
Time Factors
Abstract
Disruption of the indigenous gut microflora with overgrowth of gram-negative bacteria and Candida species is common in the critically ill patient. These organisms readily translocate in vitro, which may cause septic complications and organ failure. A synergistic effect between Escherichia coli and C. albicans in polymicrobial infections has been demonstrated. An interaction between these organisms at the mucosal barrier is unknown.
Ca(CO2) monolayers were grown to confluence in a two compartment culture system. E. coli and C. albicans or E. coli alone were added to the apical chambers. Secretory immunoglobulin A was added to half of the apical chambers as well. Cell cultures were incubated for a total of 240 minutes. Basal media were sampled at timed intervals for quantitative culture. Monolayer integrity was confirmed by serial measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance.
Secretory immunoglobulin A decreased bacterial translocation across Ca(CO2) monolayers challenged with E. coli alone. Transepithelial passage of E. coli was significantly increased by coculture of bacteria with C. albicans. Augmentation of bacterial translocation by Candida occurred even in the presence of secretory immunoglobulin A.
Candida colonization of the GI tract may impair mucosal barrier defense against gram-negative bacteria. The clinical role of gut antifungal prophylaxis in protecting against gut derived gram-negative sepsis is speculative.
PubMed ID
10608531 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.