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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Control of transmission of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in a long-term-care facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201971
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1999 May;20(5):312-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
M. Armstrong-Evans
M. Litt
M A McArthur
B. Willey
D. Cann
S. Liska
S. Nusinowitz
R. Gould
A. Blacklock
D E Low
A. McGeer
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai and Princess Margaret Hospitals, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1999 May;20(5):312-7
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Disease Reservoirs
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Enterococcus faecium - drug effects - isolation & purification
Female
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Infection Control - economics - methods
Long-Term Care - methods
Male
Nursing Homes
Ontario - epidemiology
Vancomycin - pharmacology
Abstract
To describe the investigation and control of transmission of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in a residential long-term-care (LTC) setting. OUTBREAK INVESTIGATION: A strain of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium not previously isolated in Ontario colonized five residents of a 254-bed LTC facility in Toronto. The index case was identified when VRE was isolated from a urine culture taken after admission to a local hospital. Screening of rectal swabs from all 235 residents identified four others who were colonized with the same strain of E faecium.
Colonized residents were cohorted. VRE precautions were established as follows: gown and gloves for resident contact, restriction of contact between colonized and noncolonized residents, no sharing of personal equipment, and daily double-cleaning of residents' rooms and wheelchairs.
Two colonized residents died of causes unrelated to VRE. Although bacitracin therapy (75,000 units four times a day x 14 days) failed to eradicate carriage in two of three surviving residents, both cleared their carriage within 7 weeks. Repeat rectal swabs from 224 residents (91%) 2 months after isolation precautions were discontinued and from 125 residents (51%) 9 months later identified no new cases. Total cost of investigation and control was $12,061 (Canadian).
VRE may be transmitted in LTC facilities, and colonized LTC residents could become important VRE reservoirs. Control of VRE transmission in LTC facilities can be achieved even with limited resources.
PubMed ID
10349946 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1975 Dec;52(12):34, 37, 39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1975

[Hospital infections and their prevention in dental clinics].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203866
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1998 Sep-Oct;(5):47-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
R F Zaripova
V Iu Khitrov
V E Grigor'ev
O K Pozdeev
Author Affiliation
State Medical Academy, Kazan, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1998 Sep-Oct;(5):47-50
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Dental Clinics
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The retrospective analysis of medical documents from several dental clinics of Kazan in 1993-1995 revealed an increase in the occurrence of different form of hospital infections (HI) in patients. As the result of our investigations, the factors of the transmission of HI among the patients of dental clinics were established, the sources of infective agents were found out and the etiology of hospital purulent inflammatory diseases in dental clinics was studied. Some measures permitting the prevention of further increase in the occurrence of HI in the patients of dental clinics are proposed.
PubMed ID
9825500 View in PubMed
Less detail

[How an outbreak of MRSA in Gothenburg was eliminated: by strict hygienic routines and massive control-culture program].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188639
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Aug 8;99(32-33):3198-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-8-2002
Author
Staffan Seeberg
Leif Larsson
Christina Welinder-Olsson
Torsten Sandberg
Eva Skyman
Bo Bresky
Anna Lindqvist
Margaretha van Raalte
Author Affiliation
Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg. staffan.seeberg@vgregion.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Aug 8;99(32-33):3198-204
Date
Aug-8-2002
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bacteriological Techniques
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Hygiene
Infection Control - methods
Male
Methicillin Resistance
Middle Aged
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Staphylococcus aureus - drug effects - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The largest single-strain outbreak of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Scandinavia so far occurred at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Western Sweden 1997-2000. The strain identified was identical to the UK EMRSA-16 strain. 147 patients at 36 different wards became colonised or infected. Established routines for infection control had to be revised. The endemic situation necessitated an MRSA screening programme in October 1999 for all former hospital patients on re-admission. Since May 2000 no patient has been found with the outbreak strain at Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2002 Aug 8;99(32-33):3182-312219469
PubMed ID
12219473 View in PubMed
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[Importance of nosocomial transmission on severe acute respiratory syndrome and its prevention].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181694
Source
Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin. 2004 Feb;22(2):102-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004

[Infection control in long-term care facilities for the elderly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173888
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Jun 30;125(13):1835-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-2005
Author
Hanne-Merete Eriksen
Petter Elstrøm
Stig Harthug
Per Espen Akselsen
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for infeksjonsovervåking, Nasjonalt folkehelseinstitutt, Postboks 4404 Nydalen, 0403 Oslo. hmer@fhi.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Jun 30;125(13):1835-7
Date
Jun-30-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Drug Utilization
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Hygiene
Infection Control
Long-Term Care
Methicillin Resistance
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Abstract
In Norway, around 20 % of the elderly live in long-term care facilities. The risk of acquiring a nosocomial infection increases by age and the consequences of infections become more severe. This article describes the epidemiology of nosocomial infections and the use of antibiotics in long-term care facilities. Infection control measures are recommended.
We used data from the national prevalence surveys of nosocomial infections and from the national surveillance system for communicable diseases. In addition we reviewed current literature.
The prevalence of nosocomial infection is similar in hospitals and long-term care facilities in Norway, between 5 % and 10 %. Legal regulations require all health institutions in Norway to have an infection control programme, but little attention has been given to prevention of nosocomial infections in long-term care facilities. Less than 50 % of them have implemented the mandatory infection control programme. The vaccination coverage for influenza is only about 30 %. The coverage of pneumococcal vaccination is even lower.
The following actions are recommended for all long-term care facilities: improved hand hygiene by introducing hand disinfection, implementation of infection control programmes, and improved coverage of pneumococcal and influenza vaccination. Employing more health care personnel, nurses as well as doctors, should be a goal.
PubMed ID
16012555 View in PubMed
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Lack of transmission of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in three long-term-care facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201969
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1999 May;20(5):341-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
C A Greenaway
M A Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology at the Centre Hospitalier Régionale du Suroît, Valleyfield-de-Salaberry, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1999 May;20(5):341-3
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Enterococcus
Female
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infection Control - standards
Long-Term Care - methods
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Vancomycin
Abstract
Three patients colonized with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus were admitted to one or more of three long-term-care facilities. Six point-prevalence surveys revealed no transmission of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus after a total of 234 days of exposure during which moderately strict infection control measures were implemented. Four of 116 environmental cultures were positive.
PubMed ID
10349951 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nosocomial influenza at a Canadian pediatric hospital from 1995 to 1999: opportunities for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187998
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 Oct;23(10):627-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Robert Slinger
Peggy Dennis
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Disease and Infection Control Program, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 Oct;23(10):627-9
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Disease Outbreaks
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
Nineteen cases of nosocomial influenza occurred at a pediatric hospital during a 5-year period. Only one of the nine children with chronic health conditions had been immunized. Length of stay was prolonged for seven children, with three intensive care unit admissions. We have now implemented strategies to decrease nosocomial influenza infection.
PubMed ID
12400897 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus infection in Canadian pediatric hospitals: a Pediatric Investigators Collaborative Network on Infections in Canada Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207081
Source
Pediatrics. 1997 Dec;100(6):943-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J M Langley
J C LeBlanc
E E Wang
B J Law
N E MacDonald
I. Mitchell
D. Stephens
J. McDonald
F D Boucher
S. Dobson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Izaak Walton Killam Grace Health Centre and Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Pediatrics. 1997 Dec;100(6):943-6
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infection Control - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay
Multivariate Analysis
Organizational Policy
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
To determine nosocomial transmission of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in Canadian pediatric hospitals, outcomes associated with nosocomial disease, and infection control practices.
A prospective cohort study in the 1992 to 1994 winter respiratory seasons.
Nine Canadian pediatric university-affiliated hospitals.
Hospitalized children with symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection (at least one of cough, wheezing, dyspnea, tachypnea, and apnea) and RSV antigen identified in a nasopharyngeal aspirate.
Of 1516 children, 91 (6%) had nosocomial RSV (NRSV), defined as symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection and RSV antigen beginning >72 hours after admission. The nosocomial ratio (NRSV/[com-munity-acquired RSV {CARSV})] + NRSV) varied by site from 2.8% to 13%. The median length of stay attributable to RSV for community-acquired illness was 5 days, but 10 days for nosocomial illness. Four children with NRSV (4. 4%) died within 2 weeks of infection, compared with 6 (0.42%) with CARSV (relative risk = 10.4, 95% confidence interval: 3.0, 36.4). All sites isolated RSV-positive patients in single rooms or cohorted them. In a multivariate model, no particular isolation policy was associated with decreased nosocomial ratio, but gowning to enter the room was associated with increased risk of RSV transmission (incidence rate ratio 2.81; confidence interval: 1.65, 4.77).
RSV transmission risk in Canadian pediatric hospitals is generally low. Although use of barrier methods varies, all sites cohort or isolate RSV-positive patients in single rooms. Children with risk factors for severe disease who acquire infection nosocomially have prolonged stays and excess mortality.
PubMed ID
9374561 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.