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106 records – page 1 of 11.

[Aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci a new bacterial hazard].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202302
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 7;96(14):1694-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-7-1999
Author
A. Melhus
Author Affiliation
Kliniskt mikrobiologiska laboratoriet, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö. asa.melhus@mikrobiol.mas.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 7;96(14):1694-5
Date
Apr-7-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aminoglycosides
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Cross Infection - drug therapy - microbiology - prevention & control
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Drug Resistance, Multiple
Enterococcus - drug effects - genetics - pathogenicity
Enterococcus faecalis - drug effects - genetics - pathogenicity
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infection Control
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Virulence
Abstract
Enterococci are common causative agents in a broad range of human infections. Although formerly considered to be of low virulence, in recent years they have emerged as important pathogens, particularly in the hospital environment. Enterococci are not only intrinsically resistant to several antibiotics, but are also characterised by a potent and unique ability to exchange genetic material. With the increasing prevalence of strains resistant to ampicillin, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides, serious therapeutic difficulties have become more common. Epidemiological aspects, the mechanisms of action, the detection of antibiotic resistance, and the situation of enterococci in Sweden are discussed in the article.
PubMed ID
10222683 View in PubMed
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[Anaerobic bacteria as the cause of endogenous infections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209085
Source
Z Arztl Fortbild Qualitatssich. 1997 Mar;91(2):165-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
H. Briedigkeit
U. Göbel
Author Affiliation
Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie, Medizinischen Fakultät (Charité) der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.
Source
Z Arztl Fortbild Qualitatssich. 1997 Mar;91(2):165-70
Date
Mar-1997
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteria, Anaerobic - drug effects - pathogenicity
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Cross Infection - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Risk factors
Abstract
Most mucocutaneous surfaces of humans harbor a rich indigenous microbial flora with predominance of anaerobes. Anaerobic infections are usually endogenous indicating that they originate from the host's own flora. Important exceptions are botulism, tetanus, food poisoning by Clostridium perfringens, some cases of gas gangrene and cases of hospital-acquired C. difficile-induced diarrhea. Endogenous anaerobic infections often occur in adjacent to the mucosal surfaces. Other organs are infected by penetration or hematogenous spread. A predisposing condition to anaerobic infections is a low redox potential resulting from tissue destruction, foreign bodies, malignancy or vascular insufficiency. A mixed anaerobic-aerobic infection is often found in abscesses or tissue necrosis. Antimicrobial therapy must take into account that anaerobic infections are often associated with aerobic bacteria.
PubMed ID
9244659 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the 10-year use in Russia of cefoperazone, a third-generation cefalosporin, in the treatment of hospital infections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200889
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 1999;44(4):31-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999

[Analysis of the efficiency of treatment and causes of death in nosocomial pneumonia in the Republic of Tatarstan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186845
Source
Probl Tuberk. 2002;(7):26-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
A A Gil'manov
A A Vizel'
I Iu Malysheva
M Sh Sorokina
R S Sadykova
A A Buniatian
Source
Probl Tuberk. 2002;(7):26-30
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
Child
Cross Infection - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonia - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
A comprehensive study was undertaken to examine morbidity due nosocomial pneumonia. An epidemiological survey demonstrated a growth in morbidity and mortality from this disease among the adult population of the Republic of Tatarstan. Pharmacological and epidemiological survey indicated that antibacterial therapy was in conformity with the federal protocols in 43.9% of cases, revealed the optimization of the use of antibacterial agents after introduction of the federal standards. At the same time the low social status of patients dying from pneumonia was accompanied by their appeal for medical aid, which leads to late hospitalization and untimely intensive therapy.
PubMed ID
12561638 View in PubMed
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An epidemic spread of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a cystic fibrosis centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39259
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 1986 Apr;17(4):505-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1986
Author
S S Pedersen
C. Koch
N. Høiby
K. Rosendal
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 1986 Apr;17(4):505-16
Date
Apr-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross Infection - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cystic Fibrosis - complications
Denmark
Disease Outbreaks
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Female
Humans
Lactams
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Patient Isolation
Pseudomonas Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - drug effects
Tobramycin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Early in 1983 an epidemic of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to aminoglycosides, carbenicillin, ureidopenicillins, ceftazidime, cefsulodin and imipenem occurred in a cystic fibrosis centre. Most of the epidemic could be attributed to a specific nosocomial strain by means of O-grouping and phage-typing. This strain was present in the centre at a low frequency in 1973 and developed resistance during courses of chemotherapy. The epidemic was stopped by isolating patients with the resistant strains. Restrictive and selective use of antibiotics have not been sufficient to eradicate the resistant strains, which persist in 42% of the patients. The extensive use of the third generation cephalosporins in the clinic is probably responsible for inducing and selecting for the resistant strains. Clustering of patients in the centre has facilitated the spread. First-line use of older beta-lactam antibiotics, close bacteriological monitoring and prompt isolation of patients with resistant strains are recommended.
PubMed ID
3086274 View in PubMed
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[Antibiotic prophylaxis and therapy of pancreatonecrosis in multifield surgical hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263281
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 2014;173(6):60-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
M M Vinokurov
V V Savel'ev
I D Ushnitskii
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 2014;173(6):60-4
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Antibiotic Prophylaxis - methods
Bacteria - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Body Fluids - microbiology
Cross Infection - drug therapy - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Surgery Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Surgical Wound Infection - drug therapy - microbiology
Abstract
The article is based on an analysis of results of complex treatment of 497 patients with pancreatonecrosis at the period from 2010 to 2014. All patients were admitted to the surgical departments of Republican hospital No 2 and Centre of Emergency Medicine of Republic of Sakha (Yakutia). The investigation allowed adaptation and development of antibiotic prophylaxis and therapy management in pancreatonecrosis in multifield surgical hospital. More than 80% of patients avoided a contamination of necrotic destruction zones. The level of lethality was reduced in group of patients with infectious complications of pancreatonecrosis from 45.8% to 37.7%.
PubMed ID
25823314 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic resistance of urinary pathogens isolated from patients attending the Toronto Hospital between 1986 and 1990.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223042
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1992 Oct;22(2):129-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
C A Preston
A W Bruce
G. Reid
Author Affiliation
Division of Urology, Toronto Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1992 Oct;22(2):129-35
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Hospitals, Urban - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Ontario - epidemiology
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
A study was carried out on 1523 urinary isolates obtained at The Toronto Hospital, Canada's largest tertiary care establishment, over three 1-month periods in 1986, 1987 and 1990. Escherichia coli was the most frequently isolated organism, with Enterococcus spp. the second most common isolate in 1986 and 1987, and Streptococcus spp. in 1990. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were found to be resistant to many of the antimicrobial agents tested. Resistance patterns were found to commonly prescribed ampicillin, co-trimoxazole and, to some extent, the new fluoroquinolones, ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. These results are relevant to the treatment and management of urinary tract infections in patients attending a tertiary care hospital.
PubMed ID
1358954 View in PubMed
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[Antibiotic susceptibility of isolates from blood of patients in intensive care units of emergency medical service].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129081
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 2011;56(5-6):30-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
T V Chernen'kaia
L A Borisova
T Iu Vorob'eva
I V Aleksandrova
D A Kosolapov
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 2011;56(5-6):30-6
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetamides - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Bacteria, Anaerobic - drug effects - isolation & purification
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - etiology
Candida - drug effects - isolation & purification
Cross Infection - drug therapy - etiology - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Gram-Negative Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Humans
Imipenem - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Infection Control - standards
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Moscow
Oxazolidinones - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Sepsis - drug therapy - etiology - microbiology
Thienamycins - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Vancomycin - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
The microbiological tests of 769 blood samples from 220 patients, treated in 4 intensive care units of the N.V. Sklifosovsky Research Institute for Emergency Medical Service within a period from January 2009 to June 2010, were analysed. Etiologically significant microorganisms were detected in 323 samples (42%). 253 isolates were used in the analysis. Grampositive and gramnegative pathogens were detected in 47 and 42% of the cases respectively. Candida and anaerobic organisms were isolated in 8 and 3% of the cases respectively. Staphylococcus aureus and enterococci were isolated in 24 and 15% of the cases respectively. Nonfermenting gramnegative bacteria and enterobacteria were revealed in 25 and 17% of the cases respectively. Differences in the spectrum of the sepsis pathogens depending on the patients contingent were shown. The maximum summary susceptibility of the grampositive cocci was observed with respect to vancomycin and linezolid and that of the gramnegative bacteria was stated with respect to imipenem and meropenem.
PubMed ID
22145228 View in PubMed
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106 records – page 1 of 11.