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Alpha-defensin DEFA1A3 gene copy number elevation in Danish Crohn's disease patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133471
Source
Dig Dis Sci. 2011 Dec;56(12):3517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Cathrine Jespersgaard
Peder Fode
Marianne Dybdahl
Ida Vind
Ole Haagen Nielsen
Claudio Csillag
Pia Munkholm
Ben Vainer
Lene Riis
Margarita Elkjaer
Natalia Pedersen
Elisabeth Knudsen
Paal Skytt Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Immunology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Dig Dis Sci. 2011 Dec;56(12):3517-24
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Crohn Disease - blood - epidemiology - genetics
DNA Copy Number Variations
Denmark - epidemiology
Gene Dosage
Gene Expression Regulation
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Peptides, Cyclic - biosynthesis - genetics
Prevalence
RNA, Messenger - genetics
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Risk factors
alpha-Defensins - biosynthesis - genetics
Abstract
Extensive copy number variation is observed for the DEFA1A3 gene encoding alpha-defensins 1-3. The objective of this study was to determine the involvement of alpha-defensins in colonic tissue from Crohn's disease (CD) patients and the possible genetic association of DEFA1A3 with CD.
Two-hundred and forty ethnic Danish CD patients were included in the study. Reverse transcriptase PCR assays determined DEFA1A3 expression in colonic tissue from a subset of patients. Immunohistochemical analysis identified alpha-defensin peptides in colonic tissue. Copy number of DEFA1A3 and individual alleles, DEFA1 and DEFA3, were compared with those for controls, by use of combined real-time quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing, and correlated with disease location.
Inflammatory-dependent mRNA expression of DEFA1A3 (P
PubMed ID
21701837 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bones and Crohn's: risk factors associated with low bone mineral density in patients with Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178988
Source
Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2004 May;10(3):220-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Jesse S Siffledeen
Richard N Fedorak
Kerry Siminoski
Ho Jen
Eric Vaudan
Neena Abraham
Hillary Seinhart
Gordon Greenberg
Author Affiliation
Divisions of Gastroenterology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2004 May;10(3):220-8
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood - urine
Bone Density
Bone Diseases, Metabolic - blood - epidemiology - etiology - urine
Canada - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - blood - complications - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - etiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
Previous studies have confirmed that the prevalence of decreased bone mineral density is elevated in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The objective of the current study was to determine the prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis in a cross-sectional outpatient population of 242 adult patients with Crohn's disease and to determine which clinical characteristics and serum and urine biochemical factors might be predictive of bone loss. Thirty-seven percent had normal bone density, 50.0% were osteopenic, and 12.9% were osteoporotic. Among the sites used to diagnose low bone mineral density, the femoral neck demonstrated the highest prevalence of osteopenia and the ultra-distal radius the highest prevalence of osteoporosis. However, low bone mineral density at one site was always predictive of low bone mineral density at the other. Corticosteroid use during the year before assessment was found to be consistently predictive of low bone mineral density in males but not in females. In contrast, low body mass index and high platelet counts were consistently predictive of low bone mineral density in females but not in males. Disease location, smoking, and age were not predictive of changes in bone mineral density.
PubMed ID
15290915 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical implications of measuring drug and anti-drug antibodies by different assays when optimizing infliximab treatment failure in Crohn's disease: post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103038
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jul;109(7):1055-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Casper Steenholdt
Klaus Bendtzen
Jørn Brynskov
Ole Ø Thomsen
Mark A Ainsworth
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jul;109(7):1055-64
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic - blood
Antibodies, Monoclonal - therapeutic use
Crohn Disease - blood - drug therapy - genetics - immunology
Denmark
Drug Monitoring - methods
Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Gastrointestinal Agents - therapeutic use
Genes, Reporter
Genetic Techniques
Humans
Limit of Detection
Male
Middle Aged
Radioimmunoassay
Treatment Failure
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Cost-effective guidance of therapeutic strategy in Crohn's disease patients with secondary infliximab (IFX) treatment failure may be achieved by serum IFX and anti-IFX antibody (Ab) measurements by radioimmunoassay (RIA). This study investigated implications of using other techniques for this purpose.
This is a post hoc analysis of randomized clinical trial including 66 Crohn's disease patients with IFX failure in whom IFX and anti-IFX Ab measurements by RIA had been used for therapeutic guidance. Samples were additionally assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), homogeneous mobility shift assay (HMSA), and functional cell-based reporter gene assay (RGA).
IFX detection was comparable between assays (82% RIA, 76% ELISA, 88% HMSA, and 74% RGA), and it correlated significantly (Pearson's r=0.91-0.97, P
PubMed ID
24796769 View in PubMed
Less detail

C-reactive protein: a predictive factor and marker of inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. Results from a prospective population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92949
Source
Gut. 2008 Nov;57(11):1518-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Henriksen M.
Jahnsen J.
Lygren I.
Stray N.
Sauar J.
Vatn M H
Moum B.
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Østfold Hospital Moss, 1535 Moss, Norway. maghen@online.no
Source
Gut. 2008 Nov;57(11):1518-23
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - genetics - metabolism
Child
Child, Preschool
Colitis, Ulcerative - blood - diagnosis - pathology
Crohn Disease - blood - diagnosis - pathology
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - blood - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Phenotype
Predictive value of tests
Recurrence
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are often used in the follow-up of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aims of this study were to establish the relationship of CRP levels to disease extent in patients with ulcerative colitis and to phenotype in patients with Crohn's disease, and to investigate the predictive value of CRP levels for disease outcome. METHODS: CRP was measured at diagnosis and after 1 and 5 years in patients diagnosed with IBD in south-eastern Norway. After 5 years, 454 patients with ulcerative colitis and 200 with Crohn's disease were alive and provided sufficient data for analysis. RESULTS: Patients with Crohn's disease had a stronger CRP response than did those with ulcerative colitis. In patients with ulcerative colitis, CRP levels at diagnosis increased with increasing extent of disease. No differences in CRP levels at diagnosis were found between subgroups of patients with Crohn's disease as defined according to the Vienna classification. In patients with ulcerative colitis with extensive colitis, CRP levels above 23 mg/l at diagnosis predicted an increased risk of surgery (odds ratio (OR) 4.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5 to 15.1, p = 0.02). In patients with ulcerative colitis, CRP levels above 10 mg/l after 1 year predicted an increased risk of surgery during the subsequent 4 years (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.1 to 7.8, p = 0.02). A significant association between CRP levels at diagnosis and risk of surgery was found in patients with Crohn's disease and terminal ileitis (L1), and the risk increased when CRP levels were above 53 mg/l in this subgroup (OR 6.0, 95% CI 1.1 to 31.9, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: CRP levels at diagnosis were related to the extent of disease in patients with ulcerative colitis. Phenotype had no influence on CRP levels in patients with Crohn's disease. CRP is a predictor of surgery in subgroups of patients with either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease.
PubMed ID
18566104 View in PubMed
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Eosinophil associated genes in the inflammatory bowel disease 4 region: correlation to inflammatory bowel disease revealed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118522
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2012 Nov 28;18(44):6409-19; discussion p. 6417-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-28-2012
Author
Kristin Blom
Jenny Rubin
Jonas Halfvarson
Leif Törkvist
Anders Rönnblom
Per Sangfelt
Mikael Lördal
Ulla-Britt Jönsson
Urban Sjöqvist
Lena Douhan Håkansson
Per Venge
Marie Carlson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden. kristin.blom@medsci.uu.se
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2012 Nov 28;18(44):6409-19; discussion p. 6417-8
Date
Nov-28-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Colitis, Ulcerative - blood - enzymology - genetics - immunology
Crohn Disease - blood - enzymology - genetics - immunology
Eosinophil Cationic Protein - blood - genetics
Eosinophil-Derived Neurotoxin - blood - genetics
Eosinophils - enzymology - immunology
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Haplotypes
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic
Sex Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To study the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and genetic variations in eosinophil protein X (EPX) and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP).
DNA was extracted from ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid blood of 587 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), 592 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 300 healthy subjects. The EPX405 (G > C, rs2013109), ECP434 (G > C, rs2073342) and ECP562 (G > C, rs2233860) gene polymorphisms were analysed, by the 5'-nuclease allelic discrimination assay. For determination of intracellular content of EPX and ECP in granulocytes, 39 blood samples was collected and extracted with a buffer containing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. The intracellular content of EPX was analysed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The intracellular content of ECP was analysed with the UniCAP(®) system as described by the manufacturer. Statistical tests for calculations of results were ?(2) test, Fisher's exact test, ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls test, and Kaplan-Meier survival curve with Log-rank test for trend, the probability values of P
Notes
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PubMed ID
23197886 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of disease activity in IBD at the time of diagnosis by the use of clinical, biochemical, and fecal markers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134131
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011 Sep;46(9):1081-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Petr Ricanek
Stephan Brackmann
Gøri Perminow
Lars G Lyckander
Jon Sponheim
Oyvind Holme
Ole Høie
Andreas Rydning
Morten H Vatn
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. petr.ricanek@medisin.uio.no
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011 Sep;46(9):1081-91
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - analysis - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Colitis, Ulcerative - blood - pathology
Crohn Disease - blood - pathology
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal
Feces - chemistry
Female
Humans
Leukocyte Count
Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Platelet Count
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
The present population based adult cohort was part of a new prospective study of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in South-Eastern Norway, the Inflammatory Bowel South-Eastern Norway II study, investigating disease characteristics in an attempt to improve our knowledge regarding factors related to early clinical phenotype and disease activity.
Patients suspected to have IBD on the basis of predefined symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, and/or blood in stool for more than 10 days were examined at the local hospital. Colonoscopy with biopsies was performed and blood and stool samples were taken.
In ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, the median Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index (SCCAI) was 4 (range 0-10) in mild and 6 (range 0-14) in patients with moderate or severe endoscopic activity of inflammation (p = 0.002). The calprotectin concentration in feces was significantly related to the SCCAI (p = 0.034) and the Mayo endoscopic subscore (p = 0.031). There was a significant association between the C-reactive protein (CRP) value, leucocytes and thrombocytes and the SCCAI, but only leucocytes were significantly associated with the Mayo endoscopic subscore. In Crohn's disease (CD) patients, there was no statistical significant association between the Harvey-Bradshaw Index (HBI) and the endoscopic grade of mucosal inflammation (p = 0.8). The calprotectin concentration in feces was significantly related to the endoscopic activity score (p = 0.004), but not to the HBI (p = 0.5). HBI was significantly related to the CRP value (p = 0.047) and thrombocytes (p = 0.03).
In UC, both biochemical and fecal markers are related to disease activity and extent of disease, whereas in CD, the fecal calprotectin concentration is a reliable marker of mucosal affection, but not for systemic disease activity.
PubMed ID
21619483 View in PubMed
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Fatigue is not associated with vitamin D deficiency in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295832
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2018 Aug 07; 24(29):3293-3301
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Date
Aug-07-2018
Author
Svein Oskar Frigstad
Marte Lie Høivik
Jørgen Jahnsen
Milada Cvancarova
Tore Grimstad
Ingrid Prytz Berset
Gert Huppertz-Hauss
Øistein Hovde
Tomm Bernklev
Bjørn Moum
Lars-Petter Jelsness-Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Vestre Viken Bærum Hospital, Gjettum 1346, Norway.
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2018 Aug 07; 24(29):3293-3301
Date
Aug-07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Colitis, Ulcerative - blood - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - blood - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatigue - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vitamin D - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate if vitamin D deficiency is associated with fatigue in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
IBD patients were recruited from nine hospitals in the southeastern and western regions of Norway to participate in a multicenter cross-sectional study lasting from March 2013 to April 2014. Data were collected by interviews, from medical records and laboratory tests. The Fatigue Questionnaire (FQ) was used to measure fatigue. Linear and logistic regression models were applied to explore the possible association between vitamin D deficiency and total fatigue scores and chronic fatigue, respectively. The analyses were adjusted for age, gender, disease activity, depressive symptoms and sleep disturbance.
In total, 405 patients were included in the analyses, of which 227 (56%) had Crohn's disease (CD) and 178 (44%) had ulcerative colitis (UC). Vitamin D deficiency (
Notes
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PubMed ID
30090009 View in PubMed
Less detail

High burden of iron deficiency and different types of anemia in inflammatory bowel disease outpatients in Scandinavia: a longitudinal 2-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107012
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Nov;48(11):1286-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Palle Bager
Ragnar Befrits
Ola Wikman
Stefan Lindgren
Bjørn Moum
Henrik Hjortswang
Jens F Dahlerup
Author Affiliation
Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital , Denmark.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Nov;48(11):1286-93
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care
Anemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Colitis, Ulcerative - blood - complications - pathology
Cost of Illness
Crohn Disease - blood - complications - pathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prevalence
Scandinavia
Abstract
The prevalence of anemia in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been broadly described. The recurrence, type and burden of anemia remain unenlightened. The primary objective was to describe this. The secondary objective was to evaluate the implementation of European guidelines.
This longitudinal follow-up study included 300 IBD outpatients from six centers in Scandinavia. Patients were enrolled in a research cohort, in which each center included 5% of their IBD cohort. The study was prospectively planned, while data were retrospectively collected. The burden of anemia was calculated as number of months with anemia. A Markov model was used to calculate the probabilities of transitioning between stages. The European guidelines were used as the standard for anemia management.
Anemia affected > 50% of IBD outpatients during the 2-year observation period. Totally, 20% of the total observation time was spent in anemia. Over the 7200 months of observation, anemia was found in 1410 months. The most frequent type was combined anemia (63%). Combined anemia covers both anemia of chronic disease (ACD) and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). Pure ACD was present in 21% of burden time, while pure IDA was present in 16% of burden time. The European guidelines have mainly been implemented.
Anemia affected a majority of the IBD outpatients. One in five months, the patients were anemic. Anemia related to inflammation dominated the different types of anemia. Pure IDA was found in for 16%. These findings, despite a fair implementation of guidelines.
PubMed ID
24073709 View in PubMed
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Individualised therapy is more cost-effective than dose intensification in patients with Crohn's disease who lose response to anti-TNF treatment: a randomised, controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257651
Source
Gut. 2014 Jun;63(6):919-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Casper Steenholdt
Jørn Brynskov
Ole Østergaard Thomsen
Lars Kristian Munck
Jan Fallingborg
Lisbet Ambrosius Christensen
Gitte Pedersen
Jens Kjeldsen
Bent Ascanius Jacobsen
Anne Sophie Oxholm
Jakob Kjellberg
Klaus Bendtzen
Mark Andrew Ainsworth
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev Hospital, , Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Gut. 2014 Jun;63(6):919-27
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - administration & dosage - blood - immunology
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - blood - immunology
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Crohn Disease - blood - drug therapy - economics
Denmark
Drug Tolerance
Female
Humans
Individualized Medicine - economics
Intention to Treat Analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Severity of Illness Index
Single-Blind Method
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - antagonists & inhibitors
Young Adult
Abstract
Although the reasons for secondary loss of response to infliximab (IFX) maintenance therapy in Crohn's disease vary, dose intensification is usually recommended. This study investigated the cost-effectiveness of interventions defined by an algorithm designed to identify specific reasons for therapeutic failure.
Randomised, controlled, single-blind, multicentre study. 69 patients with secondary IFX failure were randomised to IFX dose intensification (5 mg/kg every 4 weeks) (n=36) or interventions based on serum IFX and IFX antibody levels using the proposed algorithm (n=33). Predefined co-primary end points at week 12 were proportion of patients responding (Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) decrease = 70, or = 50% reduction in active fistulas) and accumulated costs related to treatment of Crohn's disease, expressed as mean cost per patient, based on the Danish National Patient Registry for all hospitalisation and outpatient costs in the Danish healthcare sector.
Costs for intention-to-treat patients were substantially lower (34%) for those treated in accordance with the algorithm than by IFX dose intensification: € 6038 vs € 9178, p
PubMed ID
23878167 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Inflammatory bowel disease in children and adolescents. When can the diagnosis be excluded without a referral to a pediatric gastroenterologist?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33498
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jan 6;96(1-2):49-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-6-1999

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