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[3d International Conference of Critical Care Nursing (Montreal Canada, 29 August to 2 September 1988)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231009
Source
Noseleutike. 1989 Apr-Jun;128(2D):126-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Papadimitriou
Source
Noseleutike. 1989 Apr-Jun;128(2D):126-7
Language
Greek, Modern
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Critical Care - nursing
Humans
International Cooperation
Societies, Nursing
PubMed ID
2751775 View in PubMed
Less detail

4-aminopyridine toxicity with unintentional overdose in four patients with multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154078
Source
Neurology. 2008 Nov 25;71(22):1833-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-25-2008

8th Annual Toronto Critical Care Medicine Symposium, 30 October-1 November 2003, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181450
Source
Crit Care. 2004 Feb;8(1):58-66
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Jeff Granton
John Granton
Author Affiliation
Programme Director, Critical Care Medicine Programme, University of Toronto, Canada. john.Granton@uhn.on.ca
Source
Crit Care. 2004 Feb;8(1):58-66
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects - utilization
Critical Care
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Ontario - epidemiology
Respiration, Artificial
Sepsis - therapy
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology
Terminal Care
Notes
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PubMed ID
14975048 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-year retrospective study of interhospital patient transport using inhaled nitric oxide in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269280
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 May;59(5):648-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
C. Buskop
P P Bredmose
M. Sandberg
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 May;59(5):648-53
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Critical Care
Equipment Failure - statistics & numerical data
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Norway
Respiratory Insufficiency - mortality - therapy
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Tertiary Care Centers
Transportation of Patients
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Anaesthesiologists from Oslo University Hospital have transported patients with severe oxygenation failure with inhaled nitric oxide (usually 20?ppm) from other hospitals to a tertiary care centre since 2002 in an effort to reduce the number of patients that otherwise would require transport with ongoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the patient safety during transport with inhaled nitric oxide.
All patient transports with ongoing nitric oxide treatment undertaken from 2003 to 2012 were identified in the transport database. The frequency of adverse events and their impact on patient safety were studied in addition to response to inhaled nitric oxide and adjusted intensive care treatment and time aspects of the transports. Information about in-hospital treatment and survival were extracted from the hospital patient records.
Adverse events were recorded in 12 of the 104 transports. Seven of the adverse events were due to malfunctioning technical equipment, three were related to medication other than the inhaled nitric oxide and two were related to ventilation. No adverse events resulted in permanent negative patient consequences or in discontinuation of the transport. Out of 104 patients, 79 responded to treatment with inhaled nitric oxide and other treatment changes by an increase in oxygen saturation of more than 5%. The 30-day mortality was 27% in the group transported with inhaled nitric oxide.
Transporting patients on inhaled nitric oxide is an alternative in selected patients who would otherwise require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during transport.
PubMed ID
25782015 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal aortic aneurysms: should they all be resected?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249460
Source
Br J Surg. 1977 Nov;64(11):767-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1977
Author
J. Christenson
B. Eklöf
I. Gustafson
Source
Br J Surg. 1977 Nov;64(11):767-72
Date
Nov-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aorta, Abdominal - surgery
Aortic Aneurysm - mortality - surgery
Aortic Rupture - surgery
Critical Care
Emergencies
Female
Humans
Male
Postoperative Care
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
A retrospective study has been carried out on 124 consecutive patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms admitted during the period 1960-74. The mortality rate after emergency operation was 56 per cent and after elective operation 15 per cent. As in other vascular centres during these years the mortality rate has decreased among electively operated patients. We have tried to answer two questions: which patients without signs of rupture should undergo operation and which patients with a ruptured aneurysm should not be operated upon?
PubMed ID
588967 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accounting for vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage in pandemic critical care triage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96997
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Chris Kaposy
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. christopher.kaposy@med.mun.ca
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Critical Care
Cultural Characteristics
Disaster Planning - trends
Disease Outbreaks
Health Care Rationing - ethics
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - ethnology - mortality - virology
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - standards
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Patient Selection - ethics
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Social Class
Triage - methods - organization & administration - standards - trends
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In a pandemic situation, resources in intensive care units may be stretched to the breaking point, and critical care triage may become necessary. In such a situation, I argue that a patient's combined vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage should be a justification for giving that patient some priority for critical care. In this article I present an example of a critical care triage protocol that recognizes the moral relevance of vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage, from the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
PubMed ID
20465071 View in PubMed
Less detail

The accuracy of administrative data for identifying the presence and timing of admission to intensive care units in a Canadian province.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127694
Source
Med Care. 2012 Mar;50(3):e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Allan Garland
Marina Yogendran
Kendiss Olafson
Damon C Scales
Kari-Lynne McGowan
Randy Fransoo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. agarland@hsc.mb.ca
Source
Med Care. 2012 Mar;50(3):e1-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Critical Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual - standards
Hospital Information Systems - organization & administration - standards
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Manitoba
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
A prerequisite for using administrative data to study the care of critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs) is that it accurately identifies such care. Only limited data exist on this subject.
To assess the accuracy of administrative data in the Canadian province of Manitoba for identifying the existence, number, and timing of admissions to adult ICUs.
For the period 1999 to 2008, we compared information about ICU care from Manitoba hospital abstracts, with the criterion standard of a clinical ICU database that includes all admissions to adult ICUs in its largest city of Winnipeg. Comparisons were made before and after a national change in administrative data requirements that mandated specific data elements identifying the existence and timing of ICU care.
In both time intervals, hospital abstracts were extremely accurate in identifying the presence of ICU care, with positive predictive values exceeding 98% and negative predictive values exceeding 99%. Administrative data correctly identified the number of separate ICU admissions for 93% of ICU-containing hospitalizations; inaccuracy increased with more ICU stays per hospitalization. Hospital abstracts were highly accurate for identifying the timing of ICU care, but only for hospitalizations containing a single ICU admission.
Under current national-reporting requirements, hospital administrative data in Canada can be used to accurately identify and quantify ICU care. The high accuracy of Manitoba administrative data under the previous reporting standards, which lacked standardized coding elements specific to ICU care, may not be generalizable to other Canadian jurisdictions.
PubMed ID
22270100 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute airway management in the critically ill child requiring transport.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226728
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1991 Mar;38(2):252-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
J. Fuller
T. Frewen
R. Lee
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, St. Joseph's Health Centre, London, Ontario.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1991 Mar;38(2):252-4
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Critical Care - organization & administration
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant
Ontario
Patient care team
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Retrospective Studies
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
Airway compromise was found to be a common problem in children requiring critical care transport to our hospital. This retrospective review of 39 infants and children was undertaken to assess the frequency and degree of airway compromise in these children, to document the management required and to determine who performed it. Ninety-seven per cent of children had airway difficulties associated with their disease, and one-third of these required further airway management on the arrival of the transport team. Airway specialists had not been involved in the care of these children before the arrival of the transport team. This indicates that greater attention should be paid to airway management as soon as children are identified as being sufficiently ill to require transport to a tertiary care facility.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 1991 Mar;38(2):151-42021985
PubMed ID
2021999 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Mar;44(1):3-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Louise Rose
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Mar;44(1):3-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Canada
Critical Care
Humans
PubMed ID
22679841 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute care surgery: the impact of an acute care surgery service on assessment, flow, and disposition in the emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126302
Source
Am J Surg. 2012 May;203(5):578-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Chad G Ball
Anthony R MacLean
Elijah Dixon
May Lynn Quan
Lynn Nicholson
Andrew W Kirkpatrick
Francis R Sutherland
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403 29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ball.chad@gmail.com
Source
Am J Surg. 2012 May;203(5):578-83
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Critical Care - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Treatment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Acute care surgery (ACS) services are becoming increasingly popular.
Assessment, flow, and disposition of adult ACS patients (acute, nontrauma surgical conditions) through the emergency department (ED) in a large health care system (Calgary) were prospectively analyzed.
Among 447 ACS ED consultations over 3 centers (70% admitted to ACS), the median wait time from the consultation request to ACS arrival was 36 minutes, and from ACS arrival to the admission request it was 91 minutes. The total ACS-dependent time was 127 minutes compared with 261 minutes for initial ED activities and 104 minutes for transfer to a hospital ward (P
PubMed ID
22402265 View in PubMed
Less detail

606 records – page 1 of 61.