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39 records – page 1 of 4.

The ability of criminal law to produce gender equality: judicial discourses in the Swedish criminal legal system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98450
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Monica Burman
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Sweden. monica.burman@jus.umu.se
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Networks - organization & administration
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Sex Factors
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Value of Life
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The main aim of the Swedish Women's Peace reform in 1998 was to enhance criminal legal protection for women exposed to violence in heterosexual relationships and to promote gender equality. However, these ambitions risk being contravened in a masculinist criminal legal system. One problem concerns how the victim is constructed in criminal legal cases. The author argues that moral balancing and discourses of responsibility and guilt in Swedish cases constrain the agency possible for women and suggest that a more comprehensive policy in Sweden must be developed to include violent men, their agency, and their responsibility for the violence.
PubMed ID
20053946 View in PubMed
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And justice for all? Aboriginal victims of sexual violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156836
Source
Violence Against Women. 2008 Jun;14(6):678-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Arielle Dylan
Cheryl Regehr
Ramona Alaggia
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
Violence Against Women. 2008 Jun;14(6):678-96
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Police - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Control, Formal
Social Responsibility
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
Concern for the recognition, support, and rights of victims within the criminal justice system has grown in recent years, leading to legislative and procedural changes in the administration of justice that have improved the experiences of victims. What is not clear is whether all victims have benefited from changes in the system regardless of race and social class. This study investigates the experiences Aboriginal people who are victims of sexual violence have with the Canadian criminal justice system. The authors seek to explore perspectives about their encounters with the judicial system from the point of first contact with the police through involvement with the court and community service providers, utilizing grounded theory qualitative methodology. They conclude that race is a key determinant in the manner in which a victim will be perceived by the people in the justice system and the manner in which the victim will approach the judicial process.
PubMed ID
18535308 View in PubMed
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Assessing the "criminalization" of the mentally ill in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222998
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1992 Oct;37(8):532-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
S. Davis
Author Affiliation
School of Criminology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1992 Oct;37(8):532-8
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Deinstitutionalization - legislation & jurisprudence
Homeless Persons - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Humans
Insanity Defense
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
United States
Abstract
This paper is an overview of the conceptual and methodological problems encountered trying to assess the hypothesis that the mentally ill, as a consequence of deinstitutionalization, are being "criminalized". Generalizations are difficult to make, in large part because most of the studies are American and do not fit well into the Canadian scene. Relevant Canadian findings are reviewed and compared to the US data. There is some evidence that Canadian patients may be diverted from the criminal justice system more often than in the US, where there are fewer resources. However, this conclusion must be tempered by the fact that Canadian surveys have found high rates of mental disorder among prison and jail inmates.
PubMed ID
1423153 View in PubMed
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Canadian landmark case, Winko v. British Columbia: revisiting the conundrum of the mentally disordered accused.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197953
Source
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2000;28(2):206-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
R D Schneider
G D Glancy
J M Bradford
E. Seibenmorgen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2000;28(2):206-12
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chronic Disease
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
PubMed ID
10888190 View in PubMed
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The challenge of fetal alcohol syndrome in the criminal legal system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179443
Source
Addict Biol. 2004 Jun;9(2):161-6; discussion 167-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Diane K Fast
Julianne Conry
Author Affiliation
B.C.'s Children's Hospital, Youth Forensic Psychiatric Services, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. dfast@cw.bc.ca
Source
Addict Biol. 2004 Jun;9(2):161-6; discussion 167-8
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Judicial Role
Mentally Disabled Persons - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Pregnancy
Prisoners - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Prisons - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
People with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) present challenges to those who work in the criminal legal system. Prenatal exposure to alcohol can cause physical, neurological, and psychological impairments. It is vital to understand the individual offender in order to address the underlying reasons for criminal behavior. Individuals with FASD often come from dysfunctional backgrounds, and may have mental illnesses and substance use disorders. A comprehensive medical-legal report, prepared by a professional experienced with FASD, can help judges and lawyers understand how complex the interactions are among brain damage, genetics, and the environment. The person with FASD can be misunderstood in court, victimized in jails, and mismanaged in the transition back to the community, unless those working with the individual are aware of FASD and its implications.
Notes
Comment In: Addict Biol. 2004 Jun;9(2):167-815223544
PubMed ID
15223543 View in PubMed
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A comparison between legal and psychiatric statements regarding complaints about commitment. A study carried out in a Danish County 1990-1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202826
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 1999 Jan-Feb;22(1):37-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Andreassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Aalborg Psychiatric Hospital, Denmark. mda@dadlnet.dk
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 1999 Jan-Feb;22(1):37-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Denmark
Humans
Institutionalization - legislation & jurisprudence
Language
Psychiatry - legislation & jurisprudence
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The object of this retrospective descriptive investigation was to illustrate how compulsory committed or detained patients are evaluated in psychiatric statements from the hospital, Forensic Medical Council, and court under the Danish Mental Health Legislation of 1989. The cases were evaluated using topics and areas dealing with the previous and present medical history, legal topics, and legal premises. The investigation examines a 5-year period with 40 cases involving 30 patients, 22 cases of which were presented to the Forensic Medical Council. The investigation reveals that in dealing with the medical history only, symptoms and treatment are of interest to the court, whereas the legal grounds are of very high interest both to the court and the hospital. This investigation raises the question as to whether the form of the psychiatric statement faces reality and whether the judiciary and psychiatry view the patient from very different angles. This requires that the instrument of communication, that is, the psychiatric statement, should be accurate.
PubMed ID
10086289 View in PubMed
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A comparison of the MacCAT-CA and the FIT for making determinations of competency to stand trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194711
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2001 Jan-Feb;24(1):81-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
P A Zapf
R. Roesch
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Alabama, Box 870348, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0348, USA. pzapf@bama.ua.edu
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2001 Jan-Feb;24(1):81-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Jurisprudence
Male
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Questionnaires
United States
PubMed ID
11346993 View in PubMed
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Compulsory substance-user treatment and harm reduction: a critical analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203021
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 1999 Jan;34(1):83-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
T C Wild
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Promotion Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. cam.wild@ualberta.ca
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 1999 Jan;34(1):83-102
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Coercion
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Policy - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Legislation, Drug
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control - therapy
United States
Abstract
Compulsory treatment potentially offers a cost-effective and rehabilitative alternative to incarceration for substance-user offenders. However, the compatibility of harm-reduction principles and compulsory substance-user treatment initiatives is unclear. First, the historical record suggests that policy and legislative changes promoting diversion to treatment are typically not followed up by administrative, fiscal, and evaluative support. Moreover, cost-saving arguments underlying past programs may be inadequate to cope with concerns about civil liberties raised by compulsory treatment practices. Second, empirical evidence suggests that there may be a fundamental incompatibility between attitudes endorsing compulsory treatment and attitudes endorsing harm reduction. Finally, empirical claims about the relative efficacy of mandated versus nonmandated substance-user treatment are plagued by conceptual and methodological problems. These arguments suggest that compulsory substance-user treatment and harm reduction may not be as compatible as is commonly believed. Consequently, caution is warranted in moving toward a widespread adoption of compulsory treatment policies. [Translations are provided in the International Abstracts Section of this issue.]
PubMed ID
10052392 View in PubMed
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39 records – page 1 of 4.