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278 records – page 1 of 28.

1986 and beyond. A look into the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236215
Source
Psychiatr Clin North Am. 1986 Dec;9(4):797-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
C. Stavrakaki
B. Vargo
Source
Psychiatr Clin North Am. 1986 Dec;9(4):797-803
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Criminal Law
Financing, Government
Human Rights
Humans
Intellectual Disability
Jurisprudence
Marriage
Social Justice
Sterilization
United States
Abstract
Recent research in the field of mental retardation has pointed to a better-defined population with exacting prevalence of the basic pathology and related disabilities. Advances in the areas of prevention and treatment have further reduced the prevalence and incidence of mental retardation. Current legislation and legislative procedures have led to a more equitable and fairer application of human rights to all citizens. However, discrepancies and ambiguities still remain with respect to interpretation of the spirit of the law as related to the retarded. Financial restraints and serious economic hardship have impacted on social and political attitudes and created two-tier systems of the rich and poor with the retarded referred to as "surplus population." This situation has, in turn, influenced the availability of resources, manpower, training, and research in this field. The future could be brighter if sociologic and philosophic changes parallel technologic advances. It is our duty and commitment to continue and further the developments in all spheres relevant to the retarded in order to maximize human potential whenever possible.
PubMed ID
3809000 View in PubMed
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The ability of criminal law to produce gender equality: judicial discourses in the Swedish criminal legal system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98450
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Monica Burman
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Sweden. monica.burman@jus.umu.se
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Networks - organization & administration
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Sex Factors
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Value of Life
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The main aim of the Swedish Women's Peace reform in 1998 was to enhance criminal legal protection for women exposed to violence in heterosexual relationships and to promote gender equality. However, these ambitions risk being contravened in a masculinist criminal legal system. One problem concerns how the victim is constructed in criminal legal cases. The author argues that moral balancing and discourses of responsibility and guilt in Swedish cases constrain the agency possible for women and suggest that a more comprehensive policy in Sweden must be developed to include violent men, their agency, and their responsibility for the violence.
PubMed ID
20053946 View in PubMed
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[A criminal psychiatric study. Review of records on 103 people sentenced to hospitalization or treatment 1970-78].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242018
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1983 Apr 18;145(16):1241-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-1983

Alaska governor vetoes HIV criminal exposure bill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2995
Source
AIDS Policy Law. 1998 Jul 24;13(13):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-24-1998
Source
AIDS Policy Law. 1998 Jul 24;13(13):12
Date
Jul-24-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Criminal Law
Dangerous Behavior
Female
HIV Infections - transmission
Humans
Male
Public Health
Self Disclosure
Sexual Behavior
State Government
Tissue Donors
Abstract
On June 19, 1998, Alaskan governor Tony Knowles vetoed legislation that would have made it a felony to knowingly expose a person to HIV. Senate Bill 17 would have made criminal transmission of HIV a Class B felony, carrying a penalty of up to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $50,000. The legislation would have applied to those who knowingly expose others to HIV through sex or needle-sharing without informing their partners. The bill also would have made it illegal for people who know they are HIV positive to donate organs, semen, or ova.
PubMed ID
11365577 View in PubMed
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278 records – page 1 of 28.