Skip header and navigation

Refine By

100 records – page 1 of 10.

Acute forensic medical procedures used following a sexual assault among treatment-seeking women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175653
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Hester Dunlap
Paulette Brazeau
Lana Stermac
Mary Addison
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto at Sunnybrook and Women's College of Health Sciences Centre, Room 231, 7th Floor, 252 Bloor Street, West, Toronto, ON, M5S 1V6, Canada. hester_dunlap@camh.net
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Forensic Pathology - standards
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination
Rape - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Perception
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health Services - standards
Abstract
Despite the negative physical and mental health outcomes of sexual assault, a minority of sexually assaulted women seek immediate post-assault medical and legal services. This study identified the number and types of acute forensic medical procedures used by women presenting at a hospital-based urgent care centre between 1997 and 2001 within 72 hours following a reported sexual assault. The study also examined assault and non-assault factors associated with the use of procedures. It was hypothesized that assault characteristics resembling the stereotype of rape would be associated with the use of more procedures. The multiple regression indicated that injury severity, coercion severity, homelessness, and delay in presentation were significantly associated with the number of procedures received. Findings provide partial support for the hypothesis that post-assault procedures would be associated with the stereotype of rape, and highlight homeless women as a group particularly at risk for not receiving adequate medical treatment following a sexual assault.
PubMed ID
15778138 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute psychological reactions in assault victims of non-domestic violence: peritraumatic dissociation, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79450
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2006;60(6):452-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Johansen Venke A
Wahl Astrid K
Eilertsen Dag Erik
Hanestad Berit R
Weisaeth Lars
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health, Buskerud University College, Drammen, Norway. venke.johansen@isf.uib.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2006;60(6):452-62
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Dissociative Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aims of this study were to investigate acute and subacute post-traumatic reactions in victims of physical non-domestic violence. A Norwegian sample of 138 physically assaulted victims was interviewed and a questionnaire was completed. The following areas were examined: the frequency and intensity of acute and subacute psychological reactions such as peritraumatic dissociation (PD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety and depression; the relationship between several psychological reactions; the relationship between psychological reactions and level of physical injury, perceived life threat, and potential of severe physical injury, and the relationship between psychological reactions and socio-demographic variables. The following distress reactions were measured retrospectively: PD, PTSD, and anxiety and depression. Thirty-three per cent of the victims scored as probable PTSD cases according to the Post Traumatic Symptoms Scale 10 (PTSS-10); the corresponding Impact of Event Scale-15 (IES-15) score identified prevalence of 34% respectively. Forty-four per cent scored as cases with probable anxiety and depression, according to the Hopkins Symptom Check List 25 (HSCL-25). Severity of perceived threat predicted higher scores on all measures of psychological reactions. There were no statistically significant differences between acute and subacute groups on PD, PTSS-10, IES-15, IES-22 and HSCL-25 according to measured means (and standard deviations) and occurrence of probable cases and risk level cases. The results showed no connection between severity of physical injury and caseness. The acute psychological impairment that results from assault violence may have a deleterious effect on the mental health of victims.
PubMed ID
17162453 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute stress disorder as a predictor of post-traumatic stress disorder in physical assault victims.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180143
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2004 Jun;19(6):709-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Ask Elklit
Ole Brink
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychology, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2004 Jun;19(6):709-26
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute - complications - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The authors' objective was to examine the ability of acute stress disorder (ASD) and other trauma-related factors in a group of physical assault victims in predicting post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 6 months later. Subjects included 214 victims of violence who completed a questionnaire 1 to 2 weeks after the assault, with 128 participating in the follow-up. Measures included the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire, the Trauma Symptom Checklist, and the Crisis Support Scale. Twenty-two percent met the full PTSD diagnosis and 22% a subclinical PTSD diagnosis. Previous lifetime shock due to a traumatic event happening to someone close, threats during the assault, and dissociation explained 56% of PTSD variance. Inability to express feelings, hypervigilance, impairment, and hopelessness explained another 15% of PTSD variance. The dissociative, the reexperiencing, the avoidant, and the arousal criteria of the ASD diagnosis correctly classified 79% of the subsequent PTSD cases.
PubMed ID
15140320 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent victimization and problem drinking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185903
Source
Violence Vict. 2002 Dec;17(6):669-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Catherine Kaukinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Bowling Greeen State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403, USA. kaukine@bgnet.bgsu.edu
Source
Violence Vict. 2002 Dec;17(6):669-89
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Demography
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Violence
Abstract
This study explores the connection between violent victimization in adolescence and subsequent problem drinking. Using national data we estimate the effects of adolescent victimization on a 3-category problem drinking measure (Abstainers, Moderate, and Binge Drinkers). We also examine the differences in the social and personal consequences of drinking across victims and non-victims. These consequences include harm to friendships, health, outlook on life, marriage, work, studies, and financial position. Victims of adolescent violence are more likely to engage in subsequent binge drinking and experience negative drinking consequences, particularly negative financial consequences. The findings are consistent with the adolescent development literature, which has highlighted the importance of violent victimization in the transition to adult roles and responsibilities. Additional research, particularly longitudinal data on violent victimization and substance abuse on a nationally representative sample of young people and adults is needed to further explore the connection between violent victimization and subsequent problem drinking.
PubMed ID
12680682 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult female victims of child sexual abuse: multitype maltreatment and disclosure characteristics related to subjective health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29748
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2005 Jun;20(6):651-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Eva Jonzon
Frank Lindblad
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2005 Jun;20(6):651-66
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Disclosure
Severity of Illness Index
Social Support
Sweden - epidemiology
Truth Disclosure
Women's health
Abstract
This study examined the impact of child sexual abuse and disclosure characteristics on adult psychological and psychosomatic symptoms. Data on abuse characteristics, disclosure-related events, and subjective health were collected through semistructured interviews and questionnaires from 123 adult women reporting having been sexually abused in childhood by someone close. The results indicate that disclosure-related events have a stronger relation than abuse characteristics to long-term consequences of childhood sexual abuse. In particular, a positive reaction from a partner was related to fewer symptoms. Of the abuse characteristics, exposure also to physical abuse was strongly associated to psychological sequelae.
PubMed ID
15851534 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult Victimization in Female Survivors of Childhood Violence and Abuse: The Contribution of Multiple Types of Violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297548
Source
Violence Against Women. 2017 11; 23(13):1601-1619
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2017
Author
Helene Flood Aakvaag
Siri Thoresen
Tore Wentzel-Larsen
Grete Dyb
Author Affiliation
1 Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Violence Against Women. 2017 11; 23(13):1601-1619
Date
11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Child Abuse - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Norway
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a well-established risk factor for adult victimization in women, but little is known about the importance of relationship to perpetrator and exposure to other violence types. This study interviewed 2,437 Norwegian women (response rate = 45.0%) about their experiences with violence. Logistic regression analyses were employed to estimate associations of multiple categories of childhood violence with adult victimization. Women exposed to CSA often experienced other childhood violence, and the total burden of violence was associated with adult rape and intimate partner violence (IPV). Researchers and clinicians need to take into account the full spectrum of violence exposure.
PubMed ID
27580984 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are there detrimental effects of witnessing school violence in early adolescence?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154085
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2008 Dec;43(6):600-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Michel Janosz
Isabelle Archambault
Linda S Pagani
Sophie Pascal
Alexandre J S Morin
François Bowen
Author Affiliation
School of Psychoeducation, University of Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. michel.janosz@umontreal.ca
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2008 Dec;43(6):600-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We prospectively tested the extent to which witnessing school violence predicts psychosocial and school adjustment in students while accounting for their prior psychosocial characteristics and peer victimization. We also explored the role of feelings of insecurity in explaining this relationship.
Questionnaires were administered to 1104 students (52% boys) from five high schools from the Montreal area (Quebec, Canada) at the beginning, middle, and end of seventh grade. Self report measures included sociodemographic characteristics, victimization, witnessing violence, feelings of insecurity, internalizing and externalizing behavior problems, and measures of engagement, achievement, and truancy as indicators of school adjustment.
Witnessing school violence was a comparatively better predictor of subsequent externalizing problems and school adjustment than actual victimization. Conversely, relative to having experienced violence as a witness, actual victimization more reliably estimated later internalizing problems. Feelings of insecurity partially explained the development of school engagement and truancy.
Our findings underscore the implications of school violence as a public health and safety issue, the consideration of witnessing as important in estimating its impact, and a comprehensive approach when developing and implementing strategies that aim to prevent this form of community violence.
PubMed ID
19027649 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between violence victimisation and common symptoms in Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32534
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 Nov;54(11):815-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
G. Krantz
P O Ostergren
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Box 121 33, S-402 42 Göteborg, Sweden. gunillak@nhv.se
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 Nov;54(11):815-21
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Fatigue - etiology
Female
Headache - etiology
Humans
Irritable Mood
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Disclosure
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between violence and abuse suffered by women during childhood or adult life, and the manifestation of a high level of common physical and mental symptoms. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A questionnaire was sent to a random population of women, 40 to 50 years of age, living in a rural Swedish community. The response rate was 81.7 per cent (397 women). Odds ratios were used to estimate bivariate associations between the experience of violence/abuse and common symptoms. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to test for confounding and effect modification. MAIN RESULTS: The experience of violence or abuse during childhood was reported by 32.2 per cent of the women, while 15.6 per cent reported being abused as an adult. In both cases, these experiences reached statistical significance in their association with a high level of common symptoms (OR=1.67; 95% CI 1. 08, 2.49 and OR=2.26; 95%CI 1.30, 3.92, respectively). The associations between childhood and as well adult experience of violence or abuse and common symptoms were largely independent of potential confounders such as unemployment, job strain, social support, and sense of coherence. The combined exposure to adult violence/abuse and low psychosocial coping resources, such as low social support or a low level of sense of coherence, considerably increased the odds ratio for common symptoms and a synergistic effect seemed to exist. CONCLUSION: Violence or abuse experience is an important factor when considering illness manifestations in terms of common symptoms in women 40 to 50 years of age.
PubMed ID
11027194 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations and experiences observed for family and nonfamily forms of violent behavior in different relational contexts among Swedish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104614
Source
Violence Vict. 2014;29(1):152-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Johanna Simmons
Barbro Wijma
Katarina Swahnberg
Source
Violence Vict. 2014;29(1):152-70
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Social Environment
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine how lifetime experiences of different types of violent behavior as well as violence by different kinds of perpetrators overlap, and to investigate the co-occurrence of experiences of violent behavior by kind of perpetrator. This was done among both sexes in both a random sample from a county population (women n = 1,168, men n = 2,924) and a clinical sample (women n = 2,439, men, n = 1,767) in Sweden. More than 1 kind of perpetrator was reported by 33%-37% of female and 22%-23% of male victims of some kind of violence, whereas 47%-48% of female and 29%-31% of male victims reported more than 1 kind of violence. The reporting of 2 or 3 kinds of perpetrators was associated with the reporting of experiences of more than 1 kind of violent behavior. Health care providers must be trained to recognize the overlap of violent victimization and help prevent further victimization of those who already have such experiences.
PubMed ID
24673000 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bullying and victimisation are common in four-year-old children and are associated with somatic symptoms and conduct and peer problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279171
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2016 May;105(5):522-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Anna-Marja Ilola
Lotta Lempinen
Jukka Huttunen
Terja Ristkari
Andre Sourander
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2016 May;105(5):522-8
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bullying - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Conduct Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Logistic Models
Male
Medically Unexplained Symptoms
Peer Group
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
There are few population-based studies on bullying behaviour among preschool children. The aims of the study were to investigate the prevalence of bullying behaviour among four-year-old children, as reported by their parents, the prevalence of types of bullying behaviour and the associations between bullying behaviour and psychosocial factors.
This study was based on a population-based study sample of 931 children who attended their check-up at a child health clinic at four years of age. Parents completed the questionnaire about their child's bullying behaviour and risk factors during the check-up.
Bullying behaviour, especially being both a bully and a victim, was a common phenomenon among four-year-old children. Being a bully or both a bully and victim were most strongly associated with conduct problems, while being a victim was associated with somatic symptoms and peer problems.
Bullying behaviour was frequently found in preschool children and associated with a wide range of other problems, which indicate that routine checking of bullying behaviour should be included in child health clinic check-ups. Bullying prevention programmes are usually targeted at school-aged children, but this study highlights the importance of focusing already on preschool children.
PubMed ID
26741067 View in PubMed
Less detail

100 records – page 1 of 10.