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A 3-year follow-up study of Swedish youths committed to juvenile institutions: Frequent occurrence of criminality and health care use regardless of drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288173
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ola Ståhlberg
Sofia Boman
Christina Robertsson
Nóra Kerekes
Henrik Anckarsäter
Thomas Nilsson
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Recurrence
Residential Treatment - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This 3-year follow-up study compares background variables, extent of criminality and criminal recidivism in the form of all court convictions, the use of inpatient care, and number of early deaths in Swedish institutionalized adolescents (N=100) with comorbid substance use disorders (SUD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (n=25) versus those with SUD but no ADHD (n=30), and those without SUD (n=45). In addition it aims to identify whether potential risk factors related to these groups are associated with persistence in violent criminality. Results showed almost no significant differences between the three diagnostic groups, but the SUD plus ADHD group displayed a somewhat more negative outcome with regard to criminality, and the non-SUD group stood out with very few drug related treatment episodes. However, the rate of criminal recidivism was strikingly high in all three groups, and the use of inpatient care as well as the number of untimely deaths recorded in the study population was dramatically increased compared to a age matched general population group. Finally, age at first conviction emerged as the only significant predictor of persistence in violent criminality with an AUC of .69 (CI (95%) .54-.84, p=.02). Regardless of whether SUD, with or without ADHD, is at hand or not, institutionalized adolescents describe a negative course with extensive criminality and frequent episodes of inpatient treatment, and thus requires a more effective treatment than present youth institutions seem to offer today. However, the few differences found between the three groups, do give some support that those with comorbid SUD and ADHD have the worst prognosis with regard to criminality, health, and untimely death, and as such are in need of even more extensive treatment interventions.
PubMed ID
27745884 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up study of adolescents who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107628
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Sheilagh Hodgins
Sara Lövenhag
Mattias Rehn
Kent W Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Maria-Ungdom Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parents
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that substance misuse in adolescence is associated with increased risks of hospitalizations for mental and physical disorders, convictions for crimes, poverty, and premature death from age 21 to 50. The present study examined 180 adolescent boys and girls who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden. The adolescents and their parents were assessed independently when the adolescents first contacted the clinic to diagnose mental disorders and collect information on maltreatment and antisocial behavior. Official criminal files were obtained. Five years later, 147 of the ex-clients again completed similar assessments. The objectives were (1) to document the prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUD) and drug use disorders (DUD) in early adulthood; and (2) to identify family and individual factors measured in adolescence that predicted these disorders, after taking account of AUD and DUD in adolescence and treatment. Results showed that AUD, DUD, and AUD + DUD present in mid-adolescence were in most cases also present in early adulthood. Prediction models detected no positive effect of treatment in limiting persistence of these disorders. Thus, treatment-as-usual provided by the only psychiatric service for adolescents with substance misuse in a large urban center in Sweden failed to prevent the persistence of substance misuse. Despite extensive clinical assessments of the ex-clients and their parents, few factors assessed in mid-adolescence were associated with substance misuse disorders 5 years later. It may be that family and individual factors in early life promote the mental disorders that precede adolescent substance misuse.
PubMed ID
23989597 View in PubMed
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10 year survey of pretrial examinations in Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246688
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1979 Nov;24(7):683-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979
Author
R. Kunjukrishnan
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1979 Nov;24(7):683-9
Date
Nov-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Crime
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Saskatchewan
Abstract
The results of a survey of pretrial examination cases admitted to the provincial psychiatric hospital in Saskatchewan from 1966 to 1975 are reported. The demographic and psychiatric data and data from the psychiatric reports to the Court are analyzed. Some deficiencies noted in the reports to the Court are discussed and some remedial measures are suggested.
PubMed ID
519634 View in PubMed
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A 30-year follow-up study of a child psychiatric clientele. I. Demographic description.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68611
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Jan;81(1):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1990
Author
F W Larsen
V. Dahl
E. Hallum
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Jan;81(1):39-45
Date
Jan-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Psychiatry
Crime
Denmark
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Marriage
Mental Disorders - mortality - psychology
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Adjustment
Social Class
Abstract
A register investigation was carried out as of December 31, 1980, with the aim of giving a broad description of a child psychiatric clientele 30 years after admission to hospital. The material consists of 322 patients--189 boys (59%) and 133 girls (41%)--who were admitted during the period 1949-1951 to the only 2 child psychiatric departments at that time in Denmark. We succeeded in identifying 93% of the patients. The mean age at the time of analysis was 38.6 years (range 32-46). The material was compared with the age-related Danish population by marital status, vocational education, and socioeconomic class. A total of 115 patients (36%) had been admitted to an adult psychiatric department, and 50 patients only once. A total of 95 patients (30%) had committed criminal offences and 12 had only committed traffic offences. A total of 60 patients (19%) had obtained disability pensions. During the 30-year follow-up period, 19 patients (6%) had died. A statistically significant extra mortality was found only for women. Four patients had committed suicide. By logistic regression analysis, a statistically significant correlation was found between criminal record and admission to psychiatric department and the variables: divorce, no vocational education, and lowest socioeconomic class. About 54% had managed well, judging by the variables employed.
PubMed ID
2330827 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Healthc Prot Manage. 2014;30(2):28-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014

Abduction during custody and access disputes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223829
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1992 May;37(4):264-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
W A Cole
J M Bradford
Author Affiliation
Family Court Clinic, Royal Ottawa Hospital, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1992 May;37(4):264-6
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Custody - legislation & jurisprudence
Child Reactive Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Child, Preschool
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence
Divorce - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Insanity Defense
Male
Ontario
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In recent years abductions during divorce custody and access disputes have received greater attention from both the lay and medical press. However, little has been written on the psychopathology of the abductors or the impact on children of being kidnapped by a parent. In this study 20 cases of abduction, involving 20 parents and 37 children, were examined after the children had been located and returned to the custodial parent. Characteristics of the abduction and psychopathology seen in the children are compared to those of a control population. The outcome of assessments conducted by the family court clinic after the abductions are profiled.
PubMed ID
1611588 View in PubMed
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The ability of criminal law to produce gender equality: judicial discourses in the Swedish criminal legal system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98450
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Monica Burman
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Sweden. monica.burman@jus.umu.se
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Networks - organization & administration
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Sex Factors
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Value of Life
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The main aim of the Swedish Women's Peace reform in 1998 was to enhance criminal legal protection for women exposed to violence in heterosexual relationships and to promote gender equality. However, these ambitions risk being contravened in a masculinist criminal legal system. One problem concerns how the victim is constructed in criminal legal cases. The author argues that moral balancing and discourses of responsibility and guilt in Swedish cases constrain the agency possible for women and suggest that a more comprehensive policy in Sweden must be developed to include violent men, their agency, and their responsibility for the violence.
PubMed ID
20053946 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal youth suicide in Quebec: the contribution of public policy for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108699
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Author
Michel Tousignant
Livia Vitenti
Nathalie Morin
Author Affiliation
CRISE, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. Electronic address: tousignant.michel@uqam.ca.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Crime
Databases, Factual
Female
Housing
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Public Policy
Qualitative Research
Quebec - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The high rate of youth suicide in some First Nations villages of Northern Quebec is an important public health problem. Based on a six-year field study in three villages belonging to the Atikamekw and Anishinabe groups, this paper proposes changes in three areas of social policy that could contribute to prevention of youth suicide. These three areas are: youth protection, administration of justice, and housing. An argument is made first to adapt the youth protection law of Quebec and to give greater responsibility to communities in individual cases in order to prevent child placement outside the villages. Regarding the administration of justice, we suggest initiatives to encourage rapid prosecution of crimes on reserves and the adoption of an approach based on reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. Finally, we indicate how housing measures could help safeguard children's wellbeing given that overcrowding can contribute to suicide. The discussion also proposes that these three key changes in social policy could be relevant in other Aboriginal communities both within and outside of Quebec.
PubMed ID
23856179 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Katilolehti. 1982 Aug;87(7-8):227-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1982
Author
R. Peltonen
Source
Katilolehti. 1982 Aug;87(7-8):227-31
Date
Aug-1982
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adult
Crime
Female
Finland
Human Rights
Humans
Pregnancy
Social Conditions
Statistics as Topic
PubMed ID
6923052 View in PubMed
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1126 records – page 1 of 113.