Skip header and navigation

Refine By

209 records – page 1 of 21.

Affective responses to changes in day length in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45723
Source
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005 Jun;30(5):438-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Brian J Prendergast
Randy J Nelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. prendergast@uchicago.edu
Source
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005 Jun;30(5):438-52
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anxiety - psychology
Attention - physiology
Behavior, Animal - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Conflict (Psychology)
Cricetinae
Depression - psychology
Emotions - physiology
Exploratory Behavior - physiology
Female
Light
Motor Activity - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Phodopus
Photoperiod
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smell - physiology
Startle Reaction - physiology
Swimming - psychology
Abstract
The goal of these experiments was to test the hypothesis that day length influences anxious- and depressive-like behaviors in reproductively photoperiodic rodents. Male and female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were exposed to long (16 h light/day; LD) or short (8 h light/day; SD) photoperiods beginning at the time of weaning (day 18). Two weeks later hamsters were subjected to a series of behavioral tests to quantify anxiety-and depressive-like behaviors. In an elevated plus maze, SD males exhibited longer latencies to enter an open arm, entered fewer open arms, and spent less time exploring open arms relative to LD hamsters. SD males were likewise slower to enter either of the distal arms of a completely enclosed T-maze, and in a hunger-motivated exploratory paradigm SD males were slower to enter an open arena for food as compared to LD males. In a forced-swimming model of behavioral despair, SD males exhibited immobility sooner, more often, and for a greater total amount of time relative to LD males. Total activity levels, aversiveness to light, olfactory function, and limb strength were unaffected by SD, suggesting that the behavioral changes consequent to SD are not attributable to sensory or motor deficits, but rather may arise from changes in general affective state. The anxiogenic and depressive effects of SD were largely absent in female hamsters. Together the results indicate that adaptation to short photoperiods is associated with increased expression of anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors relative to those observed under LD photoperiod conditions.
PubMed ID
15721056 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma due to sensitization to Siberian hamster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15147
Source
Allergy. 2004 Sep;59(9):1016-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
R. González-Mendiola
P. Prieto Montaño
M. Hinojosa Macías
M. Lombardero
T. Muñoz Martin
Author Affiliation
Department of Allergy, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. chargomendi@excite.com
Source
Allergy. 2004 Sep;59(9):1016-7
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Asthma - etiology
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - etiology
Cricetinae - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Rhinitis - etiology
PubMed ID
15291917 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of antibody markers, DRB1, DRB5, DQA1 and DQB1 genes and modeling of DR2 molecules in DR2-positive patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35717
Source
Tissue Antigens. 1994 Aug;44(2):110-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
C B Sanjeevi
T P Lybrand
M. Landin-Olsson
I. Kockum
G. Dahlquist
W A Hagopian
J P Palmer
A. Lernmark
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Endocrinology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Tissue Antigens. 1994 Aug;44(2):110-9
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal - immunology
Base Sequence
Cricetinae
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - genetics - immunology
Disease Susceptibility - immunology
Genes, MHC Class II
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
HLA-DR2 Antigen - chemistry - genetics
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Immunity, Natural - genetics - immunology
Models, Molecular
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Protein Conformation
Recombination, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden
Abstract
HLA-DR2 is negatively associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The aim of the present study was to analyze DR2-positive patients among 425 consecutively diagnosed unrelated Swedish children with IDDM and in 367 matched controls. HLA-DRB, -DQA and -DQB were determined by Taq I restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes was done for DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1 and DRB5. DR2 was positive in 11/425 patients (3%) and 101/367 (28%) controls (OR 0.07, p
PubMed ID
7817375 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Antigenic characteristics of an influenza A2 virus isolated in Montreal during the outbreak of 1967-1968].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110102
Source
Can J Public Health. 1969 May;60(5):203-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1969

[Antioxidative status changes in golden syrian hamsters with experimental metabolic syndrome]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91472
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 May-Jun;80(3):103-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Zahaiko A L
Voronina L M
Kaliman P A
Strel'chenko K V
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 May-Jun;80(3):103-9
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - blood - metabolism
Animals
Antioxidants - metabolism
Cricetinae
Disease Models, Animal
Energy intake
Female
Lipid Peroxides - blood - metabolism
Lipoproteins - blood - metabolism
Liver - enzymology - metabolism
Male
Mesocricetus
Metabolic Syndrome X - enzymology - metabolism
Sex Factors
Abstract
Some indices of the antioxidant status (content of the alpha-tocopherol, reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid, activity of the glutathione reductase and aryl-esterase) and lipid peroxidation processes in the liver, blood serum, and some blood serum lipoprotein fractions of the Golden Syrian hamsters of different sex and age status under high-caloric diet were investigated. It has been shown that the hypercaloric diet leads to a decreaseng of reduced glutathione content and increase of the level of lipid peroxidation products in the liver of experimental animals. The ascorbic acids content in male liver is decreased and in female liver is increased. In the blood serum under hypercaloric nutrition the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and alpha-tocopherol content a decrease in ApoB-lipoproteins and HDL is observed. Simultaneously the ascorbic acid content is increased in the blood serum of all experimental animals. Activation of free-radical oxidation both in the liver, and blood serum is more significant in males compared with females. The data obtained allow to suppose that atherosclerotic complications of metabolic syndrome development may be connected to the lipoprotein oxidant status infringement.
PubMed ID
18959034 View in PubMed
Less detail

The apparent infection of NA-C1300 cell cultures by nucleocapsid material of the Canadian Arctic strain of rabies virus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4161
Source
Can J Microbiol. 1989 Aug;35(8):811-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
W A Webster
K M Charlton
Author Affiliation
Agriculture Canada, Animal Diseases Research Institute, Nepean, Ont.
Source
Can J Microbiol. 1989 Aug;35(8):811-3
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - immunology
Capsid - immunology
Cells, Cultured
Cricetinae
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Glycoproteins - immunology
Mephitidae - microbiology
Mice
Neuroblastoma
Rabies virus - pathogenicity
Tumor Cells, Cultured - microbiology
Viral Core Proteins - immunology
Abstract
Murine neuroblastoma (NA-C1300) and baby hamster kidney (BHK-21/C13) cell cultures were infected with the Canadian Arctic strain of rabies virus. Subcultures were passed following incubation for 3 to 4 days at 35 degrees C. The supernatant fluids from the BHK cultures demonstrated increasing infectivity in both NA and BHK cells concomitantly with an increase in the number of parent cells staining with an anti-glycoprotein stain. On the other hand, the supernatant fluids from the NA cultures initially showed higher infectivity in NA cells than in BHK cells. This feature was related to a low production of glycoprotein-staining cells in the parent NA cultures. The reduction of infectivity in NA cells of some NA supernatant fluids (and brain suspensions) by anti-nucleoprotein antibodies suggests that nucleocapsid material is, in some manner, capable of infecting NA cells. Infectivity of this virus strain in experimental mice is also related to the production of glycoprotein and may not be correlated with the degree of infection in NA cell cultures.
PubMed ID
2684375 View in PubMed
Less detail

Approaches to risk assessment of automotive engine exhausts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25393
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1990;(104):277-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
M. Törnqvist
L. Ehrenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiobiology, University of Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1990;(104):277-87
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Animals
Cricetinae
Humans
Incidence
Models, Biological
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban health
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
Contributions of alkenes to cancer risk from urban air pollution were estimated on the basis of radiation dose equivalent of target dose. The latter was inferred from the incremental carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) level in urban areas, the ratio of epoxide-haemoglobin adducts to COHb levels in smokers and the alkenes/CO level ratios in cigarette smoke and urban air. This model predicts some 200 and 5 cancer cases annually in Sweden from ethene and propene, respectively. This indicates that the risk from alkenes is of the same order of magnitude as that from the particulate fraction of the pollution.
PubMed ID
1699889 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arboviruses in Finland. V. Serological survey of antibodies against Inkoo virus (California group) in human, cow, reindeer, and wildlife sera.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254415
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1973 Sep;22(5):654-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1973

Artifactual seven-day cycles in spontaneous activity in wild rodents and squirrel monkeys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51493
Source
J Comp Physiol Psychol. 1976 Jun;90(6):572-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1976
Author
C P Richter
Source
J Comp Physiol Psychol. 1976 Jun;90(6):572-82
Date
Jun-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activity Cycles
Amygdala - physiology
Animals
Behavior, Animal - physiology
Cochlea - physiology
Cricetinae
Emotions - physiology
Environment
Female
Galvanic Skin Response
Haplorhini
Hearing - physiology
Humans
Male
Periodicity
Rats
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Sciuridae
Sensory Deprivation
Vision - physiology
Abstract
Seven-day cycles in spontaneous activity were found in wild animals (recently trapped Norway rats, chipmunks, ground squirrels, and squirrel monkeys), but not in tame domesticated animals (laboratory Norway rats and hamsters). This 7-day cycle turned out to be a function of emotional reaction of the wild animals to hitherto overlooked slight differences in activities of relevant human beings between weekdays and weekends. Elimination of ability of wild animals to react to slight environment differences by blinding or deafening abolished the 7-day cycles. No definite evidence has been found for the presence of inherent 7-day cycles in animals or man.
PubMed ID
821978 View in PubMed
Less detail

Autologous fat transplants influence compensatory white adipose tissue mass increases after lipectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9621
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2004 Jan;286(1):R61-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Eva L Lacy
Timothy J Bartness
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303-3088, USA. bartness@gsu.edu
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2004 Jan;286(1):R61-70
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adipose Tissue - pathology - transplantation
Animals
Body Weight
Cricetinae
Eating
Lipectomy
Male
Norepinephrine - metabolism
Organ Size
Phodopus
Postoperative Period
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Transplantation, Autologous
Transplantation, Homologous
Abstract
Direct tests of the hypothesized total body fat regulatory system have been accomplished by partial surgical lipectomy. This usually results in the restoration of the lipid deficit through compensatory increases in nonexcised white adipose tissue (WAT) masses of ground squirrels, laboratory rats, and mice, as well as Siberian and Syrian hamsters. We challenged this hypothesized total body fat regulatory system by testing the response of Siberian hamsters to 1) lipid deficits [lipectomy; primarily bilateral epididymal WAT (EWAT) removal], 2) lipid surfeits (addition of donor EWAT with no lipectomy), 3) no net change in lipid [EWAT or inguinal WAT (IWAT) lipectomy with the excised fat replaced to a new location (autologous)], 4) lipectomy with the same pad (EWAT lipectomy only) added from a sibling (nonautologous), and 5) sham surgeries for each treatment. Food intake generally was not affected. Body mass was not affected across all treatments. Grafts approximately 3 mo later had normal appearance both macro- and microscopically and were revascularized. The normal lipectomy-induced compensatory increases in nonexcised WAT masses surprisingly were exaggerated with autologous EWAT transplants, but not for autologous IWAT or nonautologous EWAT transplants. There was no compensatory decrease in native WAT masses with nonautologous EWAT additions. Collectively, only lipectomy triggered reparation of the lipid deficit, but the other manipulations did not, suggesting a system biased toward rectifying decreases in lipid or an inability of the hypothesized total body fat regulatory system to recognize WAT transplants.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2004 Jan;286(1):R14-514660470
PubMed ID
14525725 View in PubMed
Less detail

209 records – page 1 of 21.