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114 records – page 1 of 12.

The 24-hour urine collection: gold standard or historical practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155561
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Anne-Marie Côté
Tabassum Firoz
André Mattman
Elaine M Lam
Peter von Dadelszen
Laura A Magee
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ, Canada.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - urine
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - urine
Female
Gynecology - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - urine
Pre-Eclampsia - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care - standards
Reference Standards
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Urinalysis - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine completeness of 24-hour urine collection in pregnancy.
This was a retrospective laboratory/chart review of 24-hour urine collections at British Columbia Women's Hospital. Completeness was assessed by 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion (UcreatV): expected according to maternal weight for single collections and between-measurement difference for serial collections.
For 198 randomly selected pregnant women with a hypertensive disorder (63% preeclampsia), 24-hour urine collections were frequently inaccurate (13-54%) on the basis of UcreatV of 97-220 micromol/kg per day (11.0-25.0 mg/kg per day) or 133-177 micromol/kg per day (15.1-20.1 mg/kg per day) of prepregnancy weight (respectively). Lean body weight resulted in more inaccurate collections (24-68%). The current weight was frequently unavailable (28%) and thus not used. For 161 women (81% proteinuric) with serial 24-hour urine levels, a median [interquartile range] of 11 [5-31] days apart, between-measurement difference in UcreatV was 14.4% [6.0-24.9]; 40 women (24.8%) had values 25% or greater, exceeding analytic and biologic variation.
Twenty-four hour urine collection is frequently inaccurate and not a precise measure of proteinuria or creatinine clearance.
PubMed ID
18718568 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of predicting cardiovascular death based on one compared to several albuminuria values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260540
Source
Kidney Int. 2014 Jun;85(6):1421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Gudrun Hatlen
Solfrid Romundstad
Stein I Hallan
Source
Kidney Int. 2014 Jun;85(6):1421-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Albumins - metabolism
Albuminuria - diagnosis - mortality - urine
Biological Markers - urine
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - mortality
Creatinine - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Urinalysis
Abstract
Albuminuria is a well-documented predictor of cardiovascular (CV) mortality. However, day-to-day variability is substantial, and there is no consensus on the number of urine samples required for risk prediction. To resolve this we followed 9158 adults from the population-based Nord-Trøndelag Health Study for 13 years (Second HUNT Study). The predictive performance of models for CV death based on Framingham variables plus 1 versus 3 albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was assessed in participants who provided 3 urine samples. There was no improvement in discrimination, calibration, or reclassification when using ACR as a continuous variable. Difference in Akaike information criterion indicated an uncertain improvement in overall fit for the model with the mean of 3 urine samples. Criterion analyses on dichotomized albuminuria information sustained 1 sample as sufficient for ACR levels down to 1.7?mg/mmol. At lower levels, models with 3 samples had a better overall fit. Likewise, in survival analyses, 1 sample was enough to show a significant association to CV mortality for ACR levels above 1.7?mg/mmol (adjusted hazard ratio 1.37; 95% CI 1.15-1.63). For lower ACR levels, 2 or 3 positive urine samples were needed for significance. Thus, multiple urine sampling did not improve CV death prediction when using ACR as a continuous variable. For cutoff ACR levels of 1.0?mg/mmol or less, additional urine samples were required, and associations were stronger with increasing number of samples.
PubMed ID
24352157 View in PubMed
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[Adulteration of urine drug testing--an exaggerated cause of concern]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10489
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Feb 16;97(7):703-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2000
Author
O. Beck
M. Bohlin
F. Bragd
J. Bragd
O. Greitz
Author Affiliation
Klinisk farmakologi, Karolinska laboratoriet, Karolinska sjukhuset. olof.beck@mb.ks.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Feb 16;97(7):703-6
Date
Feb-16-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Creatinine - urine
English Abstract
Humans
Phencyclidine - analysis - diagnostic use
Reagent Strips - standards
Specimen Handling
Substance Abuse Detection - methods - standards
Sweden
Urinalysis - methods - standards
Abstract
In a study performed at a Stockholm clinic for young people with drug abuse problems, where urine adulteration was suspected to be fairly frequent, a total of 594 patient specimens were subjected to Adultacheck test strip screening for nitrite, glutaraldehyde, pH, and creatinine. Creatinine measurement was also performed at the laboratory, together with drug screening using EMIT reagents, and a subsample was spiked with phencyclidine to verify EMIT test function. The frequency of dilute urine (creatinine
PubMed ID
10740378 View in PubMed
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Age- and sex-adjusted iodine/creatinine ratio. A new standard in epidemiological surveys? Evaluation of three different estimates of iodine excretion based on casual urine samples and comparison to 24 h values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199015
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Apr;54(4):361-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
N. Knudsen
E. Christiansen
M. Brandt-Christensen
B. Nygaard
H. Perrild
Author Affiliation
Endocrine Unit, Medical Clinic I, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. nils.knudsen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Apr;54(4):361-3
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Creatinine - urine
Epidemiologic Methods
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Iodine - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Abstract
The most accurate way to measure urinary iodine excretion in epidemiological surveys is still debated. We propose a new principle of estimating iodine excretion based on casual urine samples.
A total of 123 24 h urine samples and corresponding casual urine samples were collected from 31 subjects. Iodine excretion was expressed as 24 h iodine excretion and three different estimates: iodine concentration in the casual sample, iodine/gram creatinine in the casual sample, and the new principle-iodine/creatinine ratio in the casual sample, adjusted for expected creatinine excretion of the individual.
All three estimates based on casual urine samples correlated significantly to 24 h values with a r (Pearson) of 0.37 for iodine concentration, 0. 61 for iodine/creatinine ratio and 0.62 for the age- and sex-adjusted iodine/creatinine ratio. The median iodine excretion in the entire group was 143 microg/day in 24 h samples, 87 microg/l as iodine concentration, 77 microg/g creatinine as iodine/creatinine ratio and 126 microg/day as age- and sex-adjusted iodine/creatinine ratio.
Age- and sex-adjusted iodine/creatinine ratio is a more accurate and unbiased estimate of iodine excretion in epidemiological surveys of adults than the two most frequently used estimated: iodine concentration and iodine/gram creatinine, as these two estimates may introduce a bias depending on the composition of the investigated group. The adjusted iodine/creatinine ratio is superior to the other estimates, especially when individual estimates of 24 h iodine excretion is required or cohorts of selected groups are investigated.
This work was supported by grants from the Medical Research Foundation Region Greater Copenhagen, Faroe Islands and Greenland; the Wedell-Wedellsborg Foundation; Musikforlaeggerne Agnes and Knut Morks Foundation.
PubMed ID
10745289 View in PubMed
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The AGES-Reykjavik Study suggests that change in kidney measures is associated with subclinical brain pathology in older community-dwelling persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300494
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Sanaz Sedaghat
Jie Ding
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Mark A van Buchem
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
M Arfan Ikram
Osorio Meirelles
Vilmundur Gudnason
Andrew S Levey
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - physiopathology - urine
Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Creatinine - urine
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kidney - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - physiopathology - urine
Risk factors
Serum Albumin
White Matter - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Abstract
Decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria may be accompanied by brain pathology. Here we investigated whether changes in these kidney measures are linked to development of new MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds, and progression of white matter hyperintensity volume. The study included 2671 participants from the population-based AGES-Reykjavik Study (mean age 75, 58.7% women). GFR was estimated from serum creatinine, and albuminuria was assessed by urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Brain MRI was acquired at baseline (2002-2006) and 5 years later (2007-2011). New MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds were counted on the follow-up scans. White matter hyperintensity progression was estimated as percent change in white matter hyperintensity volumes between the two exams. Participants with a large eGFR decline (over 3 ml/min/1.73m2 per year) had more incident subcortical infarcts (odds ratio 1.53; 95% confidence interval 1.05, 2.22), and more marked progression of white matter hyperintensity volume (difference: 8%; 95% confidence interval: 4%, 12%), compared to participants without a large decline. Participants with incident albuminuria (over 30 mg/g) had 21% more white matter hyperintensity volume progression (95% confidence interval: 14%, 29%) and 1.86 higher odds of developing new deep microbleeds (95% confidence interval 1.16, 2.98), compared to participants without incident albuminuria. The findings were independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Changes in kidney measures were not associated with occurrence of cortical infarcts. Thus, larger changes in eGFR and albuminuria are associated with increased risk for developing manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease. Individuals with larger changes in these kidney measures should be considered as a high risk population for accelerated brain pathology.
PubMed ID
29960746 View in PubMed
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Albuminuria and Microalbuminuria as Predictors of Cognitive Performance in a General Population: An 11-Year Follow-Up Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298098
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 62(2):635-648
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Laura L Ekblad
Sini Toppala
Jouni K Johansson
Seppo Koskinen
Jouko Sundvall
Juha O Rinne
Pauli Puukka
Matti Viitanen
Antti Jula
Author Affiliation
Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, c/o Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 62(2):635-648
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Cognition
Cognitive Dysfunction - epidemiology
Creatinine - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kidney - physiopathology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk factors
Abstract
Microalbuminuria, defined as urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR)>3.0?mg/mmol and = 30?mg/mmol, is an early marker of endothelial damage of the renal glomeruli. Recent research suggests an association among microalbuminuria, albuminuria (UACR?>?3.0?mg/mmol), and cognitive impairment. Previous studies on microalbuminuria, albuminuria, and cognition in the middle-aged have not provided repeated cognitive testing at different time-points. We hypothesized that albuminuria (micro- plus macroalbuminuria) and microalbuminuria would predict cognitive decline independently of previously reported risk factors for cognitive decline, including cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, we hypothesized that UACR levels even below the cut-off for microalbuminuria might be associated with cognitive functioning. These hypotheses were tested in the Finnish nationwide, population-based Health 2000 Survey (n?=?5,921, mean age 52.6, 55.0% women), and its follow-up, Health 2011 (n?=?3,687, mean age at baseline 49.3, 55.6% women). Linear regression analysis was used to determine the associations between measures of albuminuria and cognitive performance. Cognitive functions were assessed with verbal fluency, word-list learning, word-list delayed recall (at baseline and at follow-up), and with simple and visual choice reaction time tests (at baseline only). Here, we show that micro- plus macroalbuminuria associated with poorer word-list learning and a slower reaction time at baseline, with poorer word-list learning at follow-up, and with a steeper decline in word-list learning during 11 years after multivariate adjustments. Also, higher continuous UACR consistently associated with poorer verbal fluency at levels below microalbuminuria. These results suggest that UACR might have value in evaluating the risk for cognitive decline.
PubMed ID
29480195 View in PubMed
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[Albuminuria in persons with real hypertension, white coat hypertension and normotension].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214950
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jun 5;157(23):3322-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1995
Author
K S Kristensen
L E Bang
A. Høegholm
J W Nielsen
J. Holm
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk afdeling, Centralsygehuset i Naestved.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jun 5;157(23):3322-5
Date
Jun-5-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Albuminuria - complications - diagnosis
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Creatinine - urine
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
A prospective comparison of office blood pressure, daytime ambulatory blood pressure and urinary albumin excretion was performed in 284 consecutive patients from general practice with newly diagnosed, untreated mild to moderate hypertension. Based on daytime ambulatory blood pressure 173 were classified as established hypertensives and 111 as white coat hypertensives. A sample of 127 subjects drawn from the Danish national register served as a normotensive control group. It was found that urinary albumin/creatinine ratio differed significantly between the three groups; the difference remained significant after correction for covariables. Early morning urine albumin/creatinine ratio was weakly but significantly correlated to blood pressure. Early morning urine albumin/creatinine ratio was as reproducible a measure as 24-hour albumin excretion. It is concluded that white coat hypertensive patients have less renal involvement than patients with established hypertension, but more than a normotensive control group.
PubMed ID
7631440 View in PubMed
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Albuminuria, metabolic syndrome and the risk of mortality and cardiovascular events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90754
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):503-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Solbu Marit D
Kronborg Jens
Jenssen Trond G
Njølstad Inger
Løchen Maja-Lisa
Mathiesen Ellisiv B
Wilsgaard Tom
Eriksen Bjørn O
Toft Ingrid
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. marit.solbu@unn.no
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):503-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - complications - mortality - urine
Biological Markers - urine
Creatinine - urine
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - mortality
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
AIM: Increased urinary albumin-excretion is a cardiovascular risk-factor. The cardiovascular risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is debated. The aim of the present prospective, population-based study of non-diabetic individuals was to examine the association between low-grade urinary albumin-excretion, MetS, and cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality. METHODS: 5215 non-diabetic, non-proteinuric men and women participating in the Tromsø Study 1994-1995 were included. Urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was measured in three urine samples. The participants were categorized into four groups by the presence/absence of MetS (the International Diabetes Federation definition) and ACR in the upper tertile (>or=0.75 mg/mmol). RESULTS: Median follow-up time was 9.6 years for first ever myocardial infarction, 9.7 years for ischemic stroke and 12.4 years for mortality. High ACR (upper tertile)/MetS was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (hazard ratio (HR) 1.75; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30-2.37, por=0.75 mg/mmol was associated with cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality independently of MetS. MetS was not associated with any end-point beyond what was predicted from its components. Thus, low-grade albuminuria, but not MetS, may be used for risk stratification in non-diabetic subjects.
Notes
Comment In: Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):348-9; author reply 350-119201409
PubMed ID
19091314 View in PubMed
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Alkylresorcinol metabolites in urine correlate with the intake of whole grains and cereal fibre in free-living Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125563
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):129-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2013
Author
Matti Marklund
Rikard Landberg
Agneta Andersson
Per Åman
Afaf Kamal-Eldin
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7051, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. matti.marklund@slu.se
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):129-36
Date
Jan-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Alkylation
Biological Markers - urine
Cereals - chemistry - metabolism
Creatinine - urine
Diet Records
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage - metabolism
Female
Food Handling
Humans
Hydroxybenzoates - metabolism - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Phenols - metabolism - urine
Phenylpropionates
Propionates - metabolism - urine
Reproducibility of Results
Resorcinols - metabolism - urine
Secale cereale - chemistry
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Alkylresorcinols (AR) have been established as short/medium-term biomarkers for whole grain (WG) wheat and rye intake; and AR metabolites, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 3-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-propanoic acid, have been suggested as complementary biomarkers to AR. The present study examined the medium-term reproducibility and relative validity of urinary AR metabolites as biomarkers for WG and cereal fibre intake. A total of sixty-six free-living Swedes completed 3 d weighed food records and provided single 24 h urine collections and morning urine spot samples on two occasions, 2-3 months apart. The medium-term reproducibility of urinary AR metabolites was moderate when assessed in 24 h collections and lower in creatinine (CR)-adjusted morning urine. Mean AR metabolite 24 h excretions correlated well with total WG (r(s) 0·31-0·52, P
PubMed ID
22470195 View in PubMed
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Aspartylglycosaminuria in Northern Norway in eight patients: clinical heterogeneity and variations with the diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41815
Source
J Inherit Metab Dis. 1978;1(3):95-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
O. Borud
J H Strömme
S O Lie
K H Torp
Source
J Inherit Metab Dis. 1978;1(3):95-7
Date
1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylglucosamine - analogs & derivatives - urine
Adolescent
Adult
Amidohydrolases - deficiency
Aspartic Acid - analogs & derivatives - urine
Aspartylglucosylaminase - deficiency
Child
Child, Preschool
Creatinine - urine
Dietary Proteins
Female
Glucosamine - analogs & derivatives
Humans
Male
Mental Retardation - urine
Mucolipidoses - urine
Abstract
Urinary excretion of aspartylglycosamines was investigated in eight patients by semiquantitative thin-layer chromatography, and bound glycosamines by a quantitative photometric method (Elson-Morgan reaction). Each patient showed a fairly constant level, relative to the creatinine, of aspartylglycosamines in urine. The least retarded patient, aged 31, excreted about 350 mg/g creatinine, one-third of that found in two severely retarded young patients, aged 4 and 7 years (1400 and 940 mg/g creatinine, respectively). Three days on a low-protein diet did not change the aspartylglycosamine excretion in the patient showing the highest excretion rate.
PubMed ID
116085 View in PubMed
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114 records – page 1 of 12.