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314 records – page 1 of 32.

20 years or more of follow-up of living kidney donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222923
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1992
Author
J S Najarian
B M Chavers
L E McHugh
A J Matas
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455.
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Date
Oct-3-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - urine
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Creatinine - blood - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Kidney - physiology
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Proteinuria - etiology
Pulmonary Embolism - mortality
Tissue Donors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The perioperative and long-term risks for living kidney donors are of concern. We have studied donors at the University of Minnesota 20 years or more (mean 23.7) after donation by comparing renal function, blood pressure, and proteinuria in donors with siblings. In 57 donors (mean age 61 [SE 1]), mean serum creatinine is 1.1 (0.01) mg/dl, blood urea nitrogen 17 (0.5) mg/dl, creatinine clearance 82 (2) ml/min, and blood pressure 134 (2)/80 (1) mm Hg. 32% of the donors are taking antihypertensive drugs and 23% have proteinuria. The 65 siblings (mean age 58 [1.3]) do not significantly differ from the donors in any of these variables: 1.1 (0.03) mg/dl, 17 (1.2) mg/dl, 89 (3.3) ml/min, and 130 (3)/80 (1.5) mm Hg, respectively. 44% of the siblings are taking antihypertensives and 22% have proteinuria. To assess perioperative mortality, we surveyed all members of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons about donor mortality at their institutions. We documented 17 perioperative deaths in the USA and Canada after living donation, and estimate mortality to be 0.03%. We conclude that perioperative mortality in the USA and Canada after living-donor nephrectomy is low. In long-term follow-up of our living donors, we found no evidence of progressive renal deterioration or other serious disorders.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1992 Nov 28;340(8831):1354-51360068
PubMed ID
1357243 View in PubMed
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ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139624
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2010 Oct;57(10):A4197
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Karoline Schousboe
Kjell Titlestad
Francois Baudier
Lars Ulrich Hansen
Claus Bistrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. kschousboe@dadlnet.dk
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2010 Oct;57(10):A4197
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived - therapeutic use
Antigens, CD20 - immunology
Blood Group Incompatibility - blood - immunology
Creatinine - blood
Denmark
Female
Graft Rejection
Humans
Immunologic Factors - therapeutic use
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - mortality - surgery
Kidney Transplantation - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Mycophenolic Acid - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
Tacrolimus - therapeutic use
Abstract
Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to shortage of donor kidneys in Denmark, there is a need to expand the possibilities for donation. At the Odense University Hospital (OUH), we have introduced ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. We used antigenspecific immunoadsorptions to remove blood group antibodies and anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) to inhibit the antibody production. The aim of introducing the ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation at the OUH was to increase the rate of living donor kidney transplantation without increasing rejection or mortality rates.
Retrospective evaluation. Eleven patients received ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. The patients were followed for 3-26 months.
One patient had an antibody-mediated rejection, one patient suffered T-cell-mediated rejection, and one patient died of myocardial infarction with a functioning graft on the third post-operative day. Both rejections were treated effectively. Among the patients, the average serum creatinine level was 128 micromol/l.
The rejection and mortality rates for ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation at the OUH are similar to the results from ABO-compatible kidney transplantations performed at the OUH and at other hospitals.
PubMed ID
21040684 View in PubMed
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Access to health care among status Aboriginal people with chronic kidney disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154422
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):1007-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2008
Author
Song Gao
Braden J Manns
Bruce F Culleton
Marcello Tonelli
Hude Quan
Lynden Crowshoe
William A Ghali
Lawrence W Svenson
Sofia Ahmed
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):1007-12
Date
Nov-4-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Creatinine - blood
Delphi Technique
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Kidney Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrology
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Ethnic disparities in access to health care and health outcomes are well documented. It is unclear whether similar differences exist between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people with chronic kidney disease in Canada. We determined whether access to care differed between status Aboriginal people (Aboriginal people registered under the federal Indian Act) and non-Aboriginal people with chronic kidney disease.
We identified 106 511 non-Aboriginal and 1182 Aboriginal patients with chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). We compared outcomes, including hospital admissions, that may have been preventable with appropriate outpatient care (ambulatory-care-sensitive conditions) as well as use of specialist services, including visits to nephrologists and general internists.
Aboriginal people were almost twice as likely as non-Aboriginal people to be admitted to hospital for an ambulatory-care-sensitive condition (rate ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46-2.13). Aboriginal people with severe chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate
Notes
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Cites: Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):155-911338156
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Cites: BMJ. 2003 Aug 23;327(7412):419-2212933728
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Cites: Health Econ. 1997 Mar-Apr;6(2):197-2079158971
Cites: Health Rep. 1998 Spring;9(4):49-58(Eng); 51-61(Fre)9836880
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1999 Mar 16;130(6):461-7010075613
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 1999 Apr;33(4):728-3310196016
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2005 Feb;16(2):459-6615615823
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96 Suppl 1:S39-4415686152
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2007 Nov;18(11):2953-917942955
Comment In: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):985-618981431
PubMed ID
18981441 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of GFR estimating equations combining standardized cystatin C and creatinine assays: a cross-sectional study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270880
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2015 Feb;53(3):403-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Jonas Björk
Anders Grubb
Anders Larsson
Lars-Olof Hansson
Mats Flodin
Gunnar Sterner
Veronica Lindström
Ulf Nyman
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2015 Feb;53(3):403-14
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cystatin C - blood
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - blood - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The recently established international cystatin C calibrator makes it possible to develop non-laboratory specific glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating (eGFR) equations. This study compares the performance of the arithmetic mean of the revised Lund-Malmö creatinine and CAPA cystatin C equations (MEANLM-REV+CAPA), the arithmetic mean of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation (CKD-EPI) creatinine and cystatin C equations (MEANCKD-EPI), and the composite CKD-EPI equation (CKD-EPICREA+CYSC) with the corresponding single marker equations using internationally standardized calibrators for both cystatin C and creatinine.
The study included 1200 examinations in 1112 adult Swedish patients referred for measurement of GFR (mGFR) 2008-2010 by plasma clearance of iohexol (median 51 mL/min/1.73 m2). Bias, precision (interquartile range, IQR) and accuracy (percentage of estimates ±30% of mGFR; P30) were compared.
Combined marker equations were unbiased and had higher precision and accuracy than single marker equations. Overall results of MEANLM-REV+CAPA/MEANCKD-EPI/CKD-EPICREA+CYSC were: median bias -2.2%/-0.5%/-1.6%, IQR 9.2/9.2/8.8 mL/min/1.73 m2, and P30 91.3%/91.0%/91.1%. The P30 figures were about 7-14 percentage points higher than the single marker equations. The combined equations also had a more stable performance across mGFR, age and BMI intervals, generally with P30 =90% and never
PubMed ID
25274955 View in PubMed
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[ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME WITHOUT ST SEGMENT ELEVATION: POSSIBILITIES FOR PREDICTING THE CLINICAL COURSE AT THE POST-HOSPITAL (6 AND 12 MONTHS) STAGE].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275680
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2016;94(3):205-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2016;94(3):205-10
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - complications - diagnosis - metabolism - mortality
Aged
Calcium - blood
Creatinine - blood
Electrocardiography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interleukin-10 - blood
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Melatonin - analogs & derivatives - urine
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Potassium - blood
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Russia - epidemiology
Sodium - metabolism
Abstract
To measure blood IL-6, IL-10, creatinine levels, calcium, sodium and potassium in blood and saliva, melatonin in urine of patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST segment elevation for the prediction of the clinical course at the post-hospital stage.
The study included 93 patients with complicated (n = 46) and uncomplicated (n = 47) coronary syndrome without ST segment elevation. Blood IL-6, IL-1, creatinine levels, calcium, sodium and potassium in blood and saliva, melatoni n in urine were determined on days 1-3 after hospitalization. 6-hydroxymelatonin was measured by HPLC in urine collected between 23 p.m. and 8 a.m., melatonin i in urine collected between 8 a.m. and 23 p.m.
Complicated coronary syndrome was associated with increased levels of melatonin (night), blood IL-10 and Na, salivary, Na and Ca while the uncomplicated condition with increased blood melatonin (daytime), IL-6, creatinine, Ca, Na, K, and salivary K. 90 patients were followed up within 12 months after discharge. End-points developed in 36 (40%) of them. Logistic analysis yielded variables and 2 logistic regression equations The data on night melatonin +5 and +4 were included in ROC analysis. The night melatonin +5 values over 0.7453 were associated with increased risk of complications in the post-hospital period (6 months) and values of 0.7453 or lower with the enhanced probability of uncomplicated clinical course. Prognostic sensitivity was estimated at 90%, specificity at -54.39%. The night melatonin +4 values over 0.2903 were associated with increased risk of complications in the post-hospital period (12 months) and values of 0.2903 or lower with the enhanced probability of uncomplicated clinical course. Prognostic sensitivity was estimated at 77.8%, specificity at -59.26%.
The night melatonin +5 and +4 models can be used to predict the clinical course of acute coronary syndrome during 6 and 12 months of the post-hospitalization period.
PubMed ID
27522726 View in PubMed
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Acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting and long-term risk of end-stage renal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260955
Source
Circulation. 2014 Dec 2;130(23):2005-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-2014
Author
Linda Rydén
Ulrik Sartipy
Marie Evans
Martin J Holzmann
Source
Circulation. 2014 Dec 2;130(23):2005-11
Date
Dec-2-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - blood - epidemiology
Aged
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - surgery
Creatinine - blood
Female
Humans
Incidence
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and is associated with adverse outcomes. However, the relationship between AKI after CABG and the long-term risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unknown.
This study included 29 330 patients who underwent primary isolated CABG in Sweden between 2000 and 2008. AKI was classified according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) classification: stage 1, >0.3 mg/dL (>26 µmol/L) or 50% to 100% increase; stage 2, 100% to 200% increase; and stage 3, >200% increase from the preoperative to postoperative serum creatinine level. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to calculate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals for ESRD in AKIN stage 1 and stage 2 to 3. Postoperative AKI occurred in 13% of patients. During a mean follow-up of 4.3±2.4 years, 123 patients (0.4%) developed ESRD, including 50 (1.6%) in AKIN stage 1, 29 (5.2%) in AKIN stage 2 to 3, and 44 (0.2%) without AKI after CABG. After multivariable adjustment, the hazard ratio for ESRD was 2.92 (95% confidence interval, 1.87-4.55) for AKIN stage 1 and 3.81 (95% confidence interval, 2.14-6.79) for AKIN stage 2 to 3.
This nationwide study of patients who underwent CABG found that a small increase in the postoperative serum creatinine level was associated with an almost 3-fold increase in the long-term risk of ESRD after adjustment for a number of confounders, including preoperative renal function.
PubMed ID
25239439 View in PubMed
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Acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting and long-term risk of myocardial infarction and death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258575
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2014 Mar 1;172(1):190-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2014
Author
Linda Rydén
Staffan Ahnve
Max Bell
Niklas Hammar
Torbjörn Ivert
Ulrik Sartipy
Martin J Holzmann
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2014 Mar 1;172(1):190-5
Date
Mar-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - mortality
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - mortality
Creatinine - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - metabolism - mortality - surgery
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Acute kidney injury (AKI) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is associated with early mortality. Its impact on the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) over time and long-term mortality has not been well described.
We performed a nationwide population-based cohort study in 27,929 patients who underwent a first isolated CABG between 2000 and 2008 in Sweden. Acute kidney injury was divided into three categories based on the absolute increase in postoperative serum creatinine (sCr) concentration compared with the preoperative baseline: stage 1, sCr increase of 0.3 to 0.5mg/dL; stage 2, sCr increase of >0.5 to 1.0mg/dL and stage 3, sCr increase of = 1.0mg/dL.
The overall incidence of postoperative AKI was 13%, 6.3% met the criterion for stage 1, 4.3% for stage 2 and 2.3% for stage 3. During a mean follow-up of 5.0 years, there were 2119 (7.6%) MIs and 4679 (17%) deaths. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals for MI were 1.35 (1.15 to 1.57), 1.80 (1.53 to 2.13) and 1.63 (1.29 to 2.07), in AKI stages 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The corresponding hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 1.30 (1.17 to 1.44), 1.65 (1.48 to 1.83) and 2.68 (2.37 to 3.03), respectively.
Our results show that AKI after CABG is associated with an increased long-term risk of MI and death.
PubMed ID
24502882 View in PubMed
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[ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY AND IN-HOSPITAL MORTALITY IN PATIENTS WITH STROKE].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270161
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2015;93(7):50-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
A M Gerdt
A M Shutov
M V Menzorov
V V Naydenova
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2015;93(7):50-5
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Aged
Creatinine - blood
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Kidney Function Tests - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - complications - mortality
Abstract
to estimate the frequency and severity of acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients with stroke and the influence of AKI on intra-hospital lethality.
180 patients with stroke. 8 (4.4%) of them died within 24 hr after admission. It was impossible to diagnose AKI in these patients from serum creatinine dynamics. The development of AKI was followed up in the remaining 80 (47.1%) men and 91 (52.9%) women (mean age 66.6 ± 11.2 yr). AKI was diagnosed and classified as recommended by KDIGO (2012).
AKI was documented in 47 (27.3%) patients including 13 (41.9%) and 34 (24.1%) with hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke respectively. Logistic regressive analysis revealed association of in-hospital lethality with AKI (relative risk 2.5; 95%, CI 1.7-3.8) regardless of sex, age, stroke type, duration of the disease prior to hospitalisation, arterial hypertension, and diabetes.
stroke is complicated by AKI in every fourth patient; in combination, they significantly increase intra-hospital lethality.
PubMed ID
26596060 View in PubMed
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Acute kidney injury assessed by cystatin C after transcatheter aortic valve implantation and late renal dysfunction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267312
Source
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2014 Aug;28(4):960-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Malin Johansson
Shahab Nozohoor
Henrik Bjursten
Per Ola Kimblad
Johan Sjögren
Source
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2014 Aug;28(4):960-5
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Stenosis - surgery
Biological Markers - blood
Creatinine - blood
Cystatin C - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Kidney - physiopathology
Male
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement - adverse effects
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate acute kidney injury (AKI) with cystatin C following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and to assess the impact of postoperative AKI on outcome and late renal function.
A prospective study.
Single, tertiary referral center.
Sixty-eight consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis and advanced comorbidity.
Blood samples were collected on 4 occasions pre- and postoperatively to determine levels of s-creatinine and cystatin C. Additionally, a sample was collected at followup 12 months postoperatively for the determination of s-creatinine.
The mean preoperative eGFR (s-creatinine) was 67±24 mL/min/1.73 m² compared to 45±21 mL/min/1.73 m² with eGFR (cystatin C) (p
PubMed ID
24315756 View in PubMed
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Acute kidney injury following coronary artery bypass grafting: early mortality and postoperative complications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127103
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Apr;46(2):114-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Linda Rydén
Staffan Ahnve
Max Bell
Niklas Hammar
Torbjörn Ivert
Martin J Holzmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden. Linda.Ryden-Lujan@karolinska.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Apr;46(2):114-20
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - blood - etiology - mortality
Aged
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - mortality
Creatinine - blood
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Mediastinitis - etiology
Odds Ratio
Postoperative Complications - blood - etiology - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stroke - etiology
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To investigate the prognostic importance of acute kidney injury on early mortality, postoperative stroke, and mediastinitis in patients undergoing a first isolated coronary artery bypass grafting.
7594 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with information on pre- and postoperative serum-creatinine values were included. Patients were classified using the Acute Kidney Injury Network classification. Odds ratios (OR) for mortality and postoperative complications within 60 days of surgery were calculated after adjustment for confounders separately for stage 1 and for stages 2 and 3 together.
1047 (14%) patients developed acute kidney injury. There were 132 (1.7%) deaths, 103 (1.4%) strokes and 118 (1.6%) cases of mediastinitis during follow-up. Among patients in stage 1 the adjusted odds ratio for death was 4.36 (95% confidence interval 2.83-6.71) and for stage 2 plus 3; 21.5 (12.0-38.6) compared to patients without acute kidney injury. Corresponding OR for stroke were 2.34 (1.43-3.82) and 6.52 (2.97-14.3) and for mediastinitis 2.88 (1.84-4.50) and 4.68 (2.07-10.6), respectively.
Acute kidney injury following coronary artery bypass grafting is related to postoperative mortality, stroke, and mediastinitis. Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting should be assessed for presence of acute kidney injury postoperatively, in order to predict early prognosis.
PubMed ID
22324648 View in PubMed
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314 records – page 1 of 32.