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33 records – page 1 of 4.

Source
Am J Sports Med. 1990 Sep-Oct;18(5):561
Publication Type
Article
Author
B D Jordan
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1990 Sep-Oct;18(5):561
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Boxing - injuries
Craniocerebral Trauma - prevention & control
Denmark
Head Protective Devices
Humans
Notes
Comment On: Am J Sports Med. 1990 Jan-Feb;18(1):98-1002301696
PubMed ID
2252100 View in PubMed
Less detail

Amateur boxing in Denmark. The effect of some preventive measures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103476
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1990 Jan-Feb;18(1):98-100
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Schmidt-Olsen
S K Jensen
V. Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Aalborg Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1990 Jan-Feb;18(1):98-100
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Boxing - injuries
Craniocerebral Trauma - prevention & control
Denmark
Humans
Methods
Abstract
A survey of all amateur boxing matches in Denmark was made during a 3 year period. Data was gathered on means by which bouts were ended by the referee or attending physician, such as knock outs or blows to the head. A total of 5272 matches were fought: 3240 were senior matches (over age 19) and 2032 were junior matches (ages 17 to 19). Prophylactic intervention--unlimited length of hand bandage, voluntary use of boxing helmets, and heavier gloves for boxers greater than 149 pounds--did not affect the frequency of matches being stopped because of knock outs or blows to the head.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Sports Med. 1990 Sep-Oct;18(5):5612252100
PubMed ID
2301696 View in PubMed
Less detail

An evaluation of football helmets under impact conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240528
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1984 May-Jun;12(3):233-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
P J Bishop
R W Norman
J W Kozey
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1984 May-Jun;12(3):233-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Craniocerebral Trauma - prevention & control
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Football
Head Protective Devices - standards
Humans
Ontario
Protective Devices - standards
Time Factors
Abstract
The impact attenuating characteristics of a sample of 81 football helmets used in competitive high school programs were determined using a Hodgson-Wayne State University (WSU) headform and a modified National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) test protocol. The helmets, classified by liner type as suspension (37), padded-suspension (22), and padded (22) had been in use for 6 to 8 years. Each was subjected to two consecutive right rear boss impacts from a drop height of 1.5 m, onto a rigid anvil covered with a 45 durometer hardness rubber pad. Analogue signals from a triaxial accelerometer located at the center of gravity of the headform were analogue to digital (A/D) converted at 6060.6 Hz and processed on a Hewlett Packard 9845B minicomputer to yield a resultant acceleration-time curve from which peak acceleration (gpeak) and the Gadd Severity Index (GSI) were determined. The mean gpeak was 205 g for helmets with suspension liners, 165 g for helmets with padded-suspension liners, and 156 g for helmets with padded liners. Twenty-four suspension helmets and five padded or padded-suspension helmets had GSI values greater than 1200. Using a criterion of GSI1500, the failure rate for suspension helmets was 19% compared to 2% for padded and padded-suspension helmets combined. If the criterion chosen was GSI1200, the failure rate for suspension helmets was 65% as opposed to 11% for the padded and padded-suspension helmets combined. Suspension helmets are decidedly inferior under impact conditions to the padded and padded-suspension helmets.
PubMed ID
6742308 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Aug 20;120(19):2331
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-2000
Author
E. Mohr
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Aug 20;120(19):2331
Date
Aug-20-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bicycling - injuries
Craniocerebral Trauma - prevention & control
Head Protective Devices
Humans
Norway
Notes
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jun 30;120(17):1955-911008524
PubMed ID
10997099 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bicycle helmets--are they up to standard?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210408
Source
Inj Prev. 1996 Dec;2(4):250-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
J. Pedder
Author Affiliation
Rona Kinetics and Associates Ltd., North Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Inj Prev. 1996 Dec;2(4):250-1
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bicycling - injuries - legislation & jurisprudence
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - prevention & control
Head Protective Devices - standards
Humans
PubMed ID
9346101 View in PubMed
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Can a combination of local, regional and national information substantially increase bicycle-helmet wearing and reduce injuries? Experiences from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34287
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1997 May;29(3):321-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
R. Ekman
L. Schelp
G. Welander
L. Svanström
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Public Health Sciences, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1997 May;29(3):321-8
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicycling - injuries
Child
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - prevention & control
Head Protective Devices
Humans
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Is it possible to substantially reduce the incidence of injuries related to cycling through the provision of information on helmet wearing? This issue has been investigated in Skaraborg County, Sweden, where 90 percent of all pre-school children now use bicycle helmets. For children under 15, there was an average annual decrease in all bicycle-related injuries of 3.1 percent, equivalent to a decrease of 48 percent over the study period, 1978-93 (for head injuries, 59%). Sweden as a whole showed a reduction of 32 percent in bicycle-related injuries (head injuries, 43%). In Skaraborg, children have been the target of helmet-wearing programs at local and regional levels since 1982, and at national level since 1987. The elderly have not been targeted in helmet-wearing programs; currently, they scarcely wear helmets at all, and showed a significant increase in their injury rate over the period (4.7% annually). The number of concussions sustained by helmet-wearers is estimated to be one-third fewer than that of non-wearers. Comparisons with Australia and some parts of the U.S.A. indicate that, despite the significant decrease in Skaraborg, greater effects might be achievable if information is supplemented by compulsory-helmet-wearing legislation.
PubMed ID
9183470 View in PubMed
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Can social psychological models be used to promote bicycle helmet use among teenagers? A comparison of the Health Belief Model, Theory of Planned Behavior and the Locus of Control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181330
Source
J Safety Res. 2004;35(1):115-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Timo Lajunen
Mikko Räsänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Middle East Technical University, ODTU 06531, Ankara, Turkey. timo@metu.edu.tr
Source
J Safety Res. 2004;35(1):115-23
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Bicycling - injuries
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Craniocerebral Trauma - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Finland
Head Protective Devices - utilization
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Abstract
The bicycle helmet use rate is still low among teenagers despite the cumulating evidence that bicycle helmets can prevent cyclists from serious injuries and death. The objective of this study was to investigate the usefulness of the Health Belief Model (HBM; Health Education Monographs, 2 (1974) (1), Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB; Ajzen, I. (1988). Attitudes, personality and behavior. Open University Press, Milton Keynes) and Locus of Control model (LC; Psychological Monographs, (1966) (80) in understanding the intention to use bicycle helmet use among bicycle helmet owners.
Data were collected at two schools in Helsinki, Finland. Students (N=965) completed a questionnaire including three social psychological models applied to helmet use. Models were compared by structural equation modeling techniques.
Results showed that the TPB and LC model fitted the data well, whereas fit of the HBM model was lower than the fit of TPB and LC models. All components of TPB and external LC orientation were significantly related to the intention to use a helmet. TPB together with LC model provide a promising theoretical framework for helmet use promotion campaigns. Practical suggestions for future bicycle helmet campaigns were provided.
PubMed ID
14992852 View in PubMed
Less detail

CMA launches bicycle-helmet campaign, hopes to reduce roadside carnage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226234
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Jun 1;144(11):1498-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1991
Author
L. Blair
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Jun 1;144(11):1498-9
Date
Jun-1-1991
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicycling
Canada
Child
Craniocerebral Trauma - prevention & control
Head Protective Devices
Humans
Societies, Medical
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1991 Oct 15;145(8):921-31913423
PubMed ID
2032201 View in PubMed
Less detail

33 records – page 1 of 4.