Skip header and navigation

Refine By

9 records – page 1 of 1.

A 4-year review of severe pediatric trauma in eastern Ontario: a descriptive analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191929
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Martin H Osmond
Maureen Brennan-Barnes
Allyson L Shephard
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. osmond@cheo.on.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe a population of children admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital with severe trauma to identify key areas for injury prevention research, and programming.
Retrospective chart review conducted on all children 0-17 years admitted to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) between April 1, 1996, and March 31, 2000, following acute trauma. Each record was reviewed and assigned an ISS using the AIS 1990 revision. All cases with an ISS > 11 were included in the study.
There were 2610 trauma cases admitted to CHEO over the study period. Of these, 237 (9.1%) had severe trauma (ISS > 11). Sixty-two percent were male. Twenty-nine percent were between the ages of 10 and 14 years, 27% between 5 and 9 years, 16% between 15 and 17 years, 15% between 1 and 4 years, and 13% less than 1 year old. The most common mechanisms of injury were due to motor vehicle traffic (39%), falls (24%), child abuse (8%), and sports (5%). Of those resulting from motor vehicle traffic, 53 (57%) were occupants, 22 (24%) were pedestrians, and 18 (19%) were cyclists. When combining traffic and nontraffic mechanisms, 26 (11% of all severe trauma cases) occurred as a result of cycling incidents. The most severe injury in 65% of patients was to the head and neck body region.
Research efforts and activities to prevent severe pediatric trauma in our region should focus on road safety, protection from head injuries, avoidance of falls, and prevention of child abuse.
PubMed ID
11791045 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A potential for prevention of bicycling-related head injuries]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32567
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jun 30;120(17):1955-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-2000
Author
K. Alvaer
B. Kopjar
Author Affiliation
Statens institutt for folkehelse Avdeling for samfunnsmedisin, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jun 30;120(17):1955-9
Date
Jun-30-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bicycling - injuries
Child
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
English Abstract
Evaluation Studies
Head Protective Devices
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Bicycle helmets prevent head injury in bicycle riders. Still, only a portion of bicycle riders in Norway use bicycle helmets. The aim of this study was to estimate the number of head injuries among bicycle riders that might be prevented by increased helmet use in Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We used data from the Norwegian National Injury Register for the years 1995 and 1996 to estimate the number of bicycle injuries in Norway. In order to estimate the number of bicycle users and helmet users in different age groups, we used data from earlier surveys of bicycle use. Data on the effectiveness of helmet promotion interventions have been obtained from a systematic review of the literature. RESULTS: The overall annual incidence rate was 92 injuries per 100,000 bicycle users. The incidence varied with age and was highest among children. If every rider used a helmet, about 1,600 head injuries would be avoided every year, of these, 800 among children aged 0-14. Currently available helmet promotion interventions may improve the use among children by about 40%, thus preventing about 1,500 head injuries over a period of three years. Successful helmet promotion interventions use a combination of health education and helmet distribution strategies. INTERPRETATIONS: There is a significant health improvement potential in promoting bicycle helmets in Norway by implementation of evaluated modes of intervention.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Aug 20;120(19):233110997099
PubMed ID
11008524 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1986;531:1-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
M G Lind
S. Wollin
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1986;531:1-47
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Bicycling
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Exertion
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Protective Devices
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Factors
Sports
Sweden
Abstract
Information concerning 520 bicycle accidents and their victims was obtained from medical records and the victims' replies to questionnaires. The analyzed aspects included risk of injury, completeness of accident registrations by police and in hospitals, types of injuries and influence of the cyclists' age and sex, alcohol, fatigue, hunger, haste, physical disability, purpose of cycling, wearing of protective helmet and other clothing, type and quality of road surface, site of accident (road junctions, separate cycle paths, etc.) and turning manoeuvres.
PubMed ID
3461642 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bicycle helmet campaigns and head injuries among children. Does poverty matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183970
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 Sep;57(9):668-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
C. Farley
L. Laflamme
M. Vaez
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Canada.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 Sep;57(9):668-72
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bicycling - injuries
Child
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Head Protective Devices
Health Promotion - methods
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Poverty
Program Evaluation
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Abstract
To assess the impact of a community based bicycle helmet programme aimed at children aged 5-12 years (about 140,000) from poor and well off municipalities.
A quasi-experimental design, including a control group, was used. Changes in the risk of bicycle related head injuries leading to hospitalisation were measured, using rates ratios.
Reductions in bicycle related head injuries were registered in both categories of municipalities. Compared with the pre-programme period, the protective effect of the programme during the post-programme period was as significant among children from poor municipalities (RR= 0.45 95%CI 0.26 to 0.78) as among those from richer municipalities (RR=0.55 95%CI 0.41 to 0.75).
Population based educational programmes may have a favourable impact on injury risks in poor areas despite lower adoption of protective behaviours.
Notes
Cites: Accid Anal Prev. 1988 Jun;20(3):177-853382495
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1987 Mar-Apr;78(2):129-353581000
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Oct 27;262(16):2256-612795807
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Jul 15;143(2):108-122364332
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1992 May-Jun;107(3):283-91594738
Cites: Pediatrics. 1993 Apr;91(4):772-78464665
Cites: Pediatrics. 1994 Apr;93(4):567-98134210
Cites: Pediatrics. 1995 Aug;96(2 Pt 1):283-77630685
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Jan;86(1):46-518561241
Cites: Accid Anal Prev. 1996 Jul;28(4):463-758870773
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Dec 25;276(24):1968-738971066
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Dec 25;276(24):1974-58971067
Cites: Chronic Dis Can. 1996 Spring;17(2):56-629079352
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1997 Jan-Feb;88(1):62-69094808
Cites: Accid Anal Prev. 1997 Jan;29(1):1-99110034
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1998;19:293-3189611621
Cites: Inj Prev. 1998 Jun;4(2):122-59666366
Cites: Public Health. 2001 Jan;115(1):38-4311402350
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2002;23:349-7511910067
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1984 Apr;74(4):340-36703161
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1987 Jan;77(1):76-83789243
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1987 Jun;125(6):989-983578257
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1989 May 25;320(21):1361-72716781
PubMed ID
12933770 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Cranial injuries among children in the county of Ringkøbing. 2. Analysis of accidents]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37004
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Oct 14;153(42):2947-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-14-1991
Author
T B Hansen
S. Pless
M. Gravers
Author Affiliation
Holstebro Centralsygehus, ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Oct 14;153(42):2947-9
Date
Oct-14-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents - classification - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Humans
Infant
Questionnaires
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
Questionnaires were sent concerning all of the patients aged 0-15 years who were admitted to the Ringkøbing County Hospitals during the period 1.1.1982 to 31.8.1989 with head injuries. The object of the questionnaires was to elucidate the circumstances of the accident which resulted in hospitalization. Questionnaires concerning 988 patients (67.5%) were returned. Definite accumulation of the accidents was observed during the period 12.00-18.00 with 55.2% of all the accidents. The majority of the accidents (72.3%) occurred out-of-doors and the majority of these on transport areas. Bicycle accidents were most common, most frequently in children over the age of four years. Where younger children were concerned, accidents in the home were commonest. Accidents in playgrounds and during sports constituted only 13% of the total material. A relatively great proportion of the children (42.9%) were under supervision, usually from their own family, when the accident occurred. On the basis of this investigation, the authors recommend that possible prophylactic measures in the County of Ringkøbing should be directed towards bicycle accidents among the older children and accidents in the homes where smaller children are concerned.
PubMed ID
1949320 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Injuries among young cyclists. The bicycle helmet could be improved]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35399
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Feb 15;92(7):658-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1995
Author
T. Wahlberg
A. Wahlberg
U. Björnstig
Author Affiliation
Kirurgiska institutionen/kliniken, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus i Umeå.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Feb 15;92(7):658-61
Date
Feb-15-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bicycling - injuries
Child
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Head Protective Devices - standards
Humans
Male
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
7861865 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Is the helmet campaign an effective way to prevent injuries? Analysis of attitudes among adults and teenagers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73081
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Feb 15;92(7):662-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1995

Prevalence of and factors associated with head impact during falls in older adults in long-term care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106830
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Nov 19;185(17):E803-10
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Date
Nov-19-2013
Author
Rebecca Schonnop
Yijian Yang
Fabio Feldman
Erin Robinson
Marie Loughin
Stephen N Robinovitch
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Nov 19;185(17):E803-10
Date
Nov-19-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Long-Term Care
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
Falls cause more than 60% of head injuries in older adults. Lack of objective evidence on the circumstances of these events is a barrier to prevention. We analyzed video footage to determine the frequency of and risk factors for head impact during falls in older adults in 2 long-term care facilities.
Over 39 months, we captured on video 227 falls involving 133 residents. We used a validated questionnaire to analyze the mechanisms of each fall. We then examined whether the probability for head impact was associated with upper-limb protective responses (hand impact) and fall direction.
Head impact occurred in 37% of falls, usually onto a vinyl or linoleum floor. Hand impact occurred in 74% of falls but had no significant effect on the probability of head impact (p = 0.3). An increased probability of head impact was associated with a forward initial fall direction, compared with backward falls (odds ratio [OR] 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-5.9) or sideways falls (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.2-6.3). In 36% of sideways falls, residents rotated to land backwards, which reduced the probability of head impact (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.04-0.8).
Head impact was common in observed falls in older adults living in long-term care facilities, particularly in forward falls. Backward rotation during descent appeared to be protective, but hand impact was not. Attention to upper-limb strength and teaching rotational falling techniques (as in martial arts training) may reduce fall-related head injuries in older adults.
Notes
Cites: BMC Geriatr. 2013;13:4023635343
Cites: J Biomech. 2003 Mar;36(3):413-2012594989
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2003 Jul;18(7):1267-7312854837
Cites: Brain Res. 1978 Mar 10;142(3):576-9638753
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1981 Jan 24;282(6260):266-86779979
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1981 Sep;35(3):200-47328380
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1987 Jul;35(7):644-83584769
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1989 Mar;79(3):316-212916718
Cites: J Gerontol. 1991 Sep;46(5):M164-701890282
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1993 Nov;41(11):1226-348227898
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1994 Sep 15;121(6):442-518053619
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1995 Nov;43(11):1214-217594154
Cites: Bone. 1996 Jan;18(1 Suppl):77S-86S8717551
Cites: J Biomech. 1998 Jan;31(1):1-99596532
Cites: Neuroepidemiology. 1998;17(3):139-469648119
Cites: Am J Med. 1998 Jun;104(6):539-459674716
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Jan 15;149(2):143-509921959
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2005 Dec;60(12):1553-716424287
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006 Oct;54(10):1590-517038079
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2007 Sep-Oct;45(2):207-1517184857
Cites: J Biomech. 2007;40(12):2612-817395188
Cites: J Neurotrauma. 2007 Aug;24(8):1355-6117711397
Cites: J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2007 Nov-Dec;22(6):350-918025967
Cites: J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2008 Apr;18(2):235-4217764975
Cites: J Safety Res. 2008;39(3):269-7218571567
Cites: Rehabil Nurs. 2008 Nov-Dec;33(6):253-919024240
Cites: Accid Anal Prev. 2009 May;41(3):642-5019393817
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2010 Mar;65(3):312-719861641
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2011 Oct;22(10):2623-3121161644
Cites: Rehabil Nurs. 2011 Nov-Dec;36(6):248-5422073504
Cites: Inj Prev. 2011 Dec;17(6):e721890580
Cites: Med Eng Phys. 2012 Oct;34(8):1071-822172523
Cites: Injury. 2012 Nov;43(11):1821-622884759
Cites: Lancet. 2013 Jan 5;381(9860):47-5423083889
Cites: JAMA. 2013 May 8;309(18):1891-223652518
Erratum In: CMAJ. 2014 Mar 18;186(5):372
PubMed ID
24101612 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.