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175 records – page 1 of 18.

A 4-year review of severe pediatric trauma in eastern Ontario: a descriptive analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191929
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Martin H Osmond
Maureen Brennan-Barnes
Allyson L Shephard
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. osmond@cheo.on.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe a population of children admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital with severe trauma to identify key areas for injury prevention research, and programming.
Retrospective chart review conducted on all children 0-17 years admitted to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) between April 1, 1996, and March 31, 2000, following acute trauma. Each record was reviewed and assigned an ISS using the AIS 1990 revision. All cases with an ISS > 11 were included in the study.
There were 2610 trauma cases admitted to CHEO over the study period. Of these, 237 (9.1%) had severe trauma (ISS > 11). Sixty-two percent were male. Twenty-nine percent were between the ages of 10 and 14 years, 27% between 5 and 9 years, 16% between 15 and 17 years, 15% between 1 and 4 years, and 13% less than 1 year old. The most common mechanisms of injury were due to motor vehicle traffic (39%), falls (24%), child abuse (8%), and sports (5%). Of those resulting from motor vehicle traffic, 53 (57%) were occupants, 22 (24%) were pedestrians, and 18 (19%) were cyclists. When combining traffic and nontraffic mechanisms, 26 (11% of all severe trauma cases) occurred as a result of cycling incidents. The most severe injury in 65% of patients was to the head and neck body region.
Research efforts and activities to prevent severe pediatric trauma in our region should focus on road safety, protection from head injuries, avoidance of falls, and prevention of child abuse.
PubMed ID
11791045 View in PubMed
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[A 5-year series. Injuries in moped and motorcycle accidents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241814
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 Jun 15;80(24):2514-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1983

[About investigations of socioeconomic consequences of neurotrauma].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145509
Source
Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko. 2009 Oct-Dec;(4):61-4
Publication Type
Article

Accidental injury is a serious risk in children with typical absence epilepsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14288
Source
Arch Neurol. 1996 Sep;53(9):929-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
E C Wirrell
P R Camfield
C S Camfield
J M Dooley
K E Gordon
Author Affiliation
IWK-Grace Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Arch Neurol. 1996 Sep;53(9):929-32
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - physiopathology
Burns - epidemiology
Child
Comparative Study
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy, Absence - complications - physiopathology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Medical Records
Near Drowning - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine if young adults with a history of typical absence epilepsy (AE) in childhood have a greater risk of accidental injury than controls with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). To assess the nature and severity of these injuries. METHODS: All patients with AE or JRA diagnosed between 1977 and 1985, who were 18 years or older at the onset of the study, were identified from review of pediatric electroencephalographic records for the province of Nova Scotia (AE) or review of the medical records database at the only tertiary care pediatric center for the province (JRA). Fifty-nine (86%) of 69 patients with AE and 61 (80%) of 76 patients with JRA participated in an interview in 1994 or 1995, assessing nature, severity, and treatment of prior accidental injuries. Patients with AE were further questioned about injuries sustained during an absence seizure. RESULTS: Sixteen (27%) of 59 patients with AE reported accidental injury during an absence seizure, with risk of injury being 9% per person-year of AE. Most injuries (81%) occurred during anti-epileptic drug therapy. Although the majority of injuries did not require treatment, 2 (13%) of 16 patients required minor treatment and 2 (13%) of 16 were admitted to hospital. The risk of accidental injury resulting from an absence seizure in person-years at risk was highest in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (45%), moderate in juvenile AE (14%), and lowest in childhood AE (3%). Patients with AE had a greater number of overall accidental injuries than those with JRA (P
Notes
Comment In: Arch Neurol. 1997 Sep;54(9):10639311348
PubMed ID
8815859 View in PubMed
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Age-related accident risks: longitudinal study of Swedish iron ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210969
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
L. Laflamme
V L Blank
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Back Injuries
Bone and Bones - injuries
Contusions - epidemiology
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Efficiency
Facial Injuries - epidemiology
Hand Injuries - epidemiology
Humans
Iron
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mining - classification - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Workload
Abstract
The study investigated whether occupational accident risks were equally distributed across age categories over time in the context of production reorganization and work rationalization in a Swedish iron ore mine between 1980 and 1993. Three phases of reorganization, defined by productivity levels, and four age categories were related to age-related accident risk ratios using the Poisson-regression method. Accident risk ratios (ARRs) were found systematically to be higher during the two first phases and also for younger workers, in the cases of both nonspecific and specific accident risks. The steady reduction in accident rates observed did not favor all age groups of workers to the same extent. For two accident patterns out of five, workers in their thirties and forties recorded higher ARRs than those in their fifties.
PubMed ID
8892554 View in PubMed
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Alarming rise in fall-induced severe head injuries among elderly people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166747
Source
Injury. 2007 Jan;38(1):81-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Pekka Kannus
Seppo Niemi
Jari Parkkari
Mika Palvanen
Harri Sievänen
Author Affiliation
Injury & Osteoporosis Research Center, UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland. pekka.kannus@uta.fi
Source
Injury. 2007 Jan;38(1):81-3
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged, 80 and over
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Registries
Abstract
This study assessed the current trend in the number and incidence (per 100,000 persons) of fall-induced severe head injuries among the very old adults in Finland, an EU-country with a well-defined white population of 5.2 million, by taking into account all persons 80 years of age or older who were admitted to our hospitals for primary treatment of such injury in 1970-2004. The number of Finns aged 80 years or older with a fall-induced severe head injury increased considerably between the years 1970 and 2004, from 60 (women) and 25 (men) in 1970 to 745 (women), and 350 (men) in 2004. The relative increases were 1142 and 1300%, respectively. Across the study period, the age-adjusted incidence of injury also showed a clear increase from 1970 to 2004, from 168 to 506 in women (201% increase), and from 172 to 609 in men (254% increase). A similar finding was observed in age-specific incidences. If the age-adjusted incidence of injury continues to rise at the same rate as in 1970-2004 and the size of the 80 year old or older population of Finland increases as predicted (approximately 2.2-fold increase during the coming 25 years), the number of fall-induced severe head injuries in this population will be about 3.4-fold higher in the year 2030 than it was in 2004. In Finnish persons 80 years of age or older, the number of fall-induced severe head injuries shows an alarming rise with a rate that cannot be explained merely by the demographic changes of the population. The finding underscores an increasing influence of falls on well-being of our elderly persons, and therefore, effective fall-prevention actions should be initiated to control this development.
PubMed ID
17083943 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Br J Sports Med. 1989 Dec;23(4):241-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
Y. Sahlin
Author Affiliation
Trondheim Regional and University Hospital, Norway.
Source
Br J Sports Med. 1989 Dec;23(4):241-4
Date
Dec-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Knee Injuries - epidemiology
Ligaments, Articular - injuries
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Skiing - injuries
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology
Abstract
Alpine skiing accidents admitted to the Trondheim Regional and University Hospital during one year were recorded. Of the 339 injured, 67 per cent were male and 33 per cent were female. Eighty-seven per cent were outpatients, and 13 per cent were hospitalized. Falling accidents (67 per cent), followed by collision accidents (17 per cent), were the most common cause of injury. The injuries in the lower extremities were caused by falling and the head injuries were mostly caused by collisions. Knee ligament strains were the most common injuries, and 17 per cent of these were hospitalized and required operative treatment. Of the minor knee strains, all 44 per cent were not fully recovered after two and a half years. Seventeen patients sustained tibial fractures, eleven of them spiral fractures and six transverse fractures. The patients with spiral fractures were younger than the patients with transverse fractures. Head injuries were the most severe injuries, with eleven concussions and two epidural haematomas.
PubMed ID
2630001 View in PubMed
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Analysis of paediatric injuries related to child restraint seats: are children at higher risk of injury outside the vehicle than inside?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161625
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2007 Sep;14(3):196-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
E B R Desapriya
I. Pike
A. Singhal
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculties of Medicine and Surgery, University of British Columbia, BC Injury Research and Prevention Unit, Centre for Community Child Health Research, Vancouver, BC, Canada. edesap@cw.bc.ca
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2007 Sep;14(3):196-8
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Consumer Product Safety
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Humans
Infant Equipment - adverse effects
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seat Belts - adverse effects
PubMed ID
17729140 View in PubMed
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175 records – page 1 of 18.