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Acute and chronic respiratory symptoms among primary care patients who smoke crack cocaine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118607
Source
J Urban Health. 2013 Jun;90(3):542-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Pamela Leece
Nikhil Rajaram
Susan Woolhouse
Margaret Millson
Author Affiliation
Public Health and Preventive Medicine Residency Program, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Urban Health. 2013 Jun;90(3):542-51
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adult
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Crack Cocaine
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Prevalence
Primary Health Care
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - complications
Abstract
Among inner-city populations in Canada, the use of crack cocaine by inhalation is prevalent. Crack smoking is associated with acute respiratory symptoms and complications, but less is known about chronic respiratory problems related to crack smoking. There is also a gap in the literature addressing the management of respiratory disease in primary health care among people who smoke crack. The purpose of our study was to assess the prevalence of acute and chronic respiratory symptoms among patients who smoke crack and access primary care. We conducted a pilot study among 20 patients who currently smoke crack (used within the past 30 days) and who access the "drop-in clinic" at an inner-city primary health care center. Participants completed a 20- to 30-min interviewer-administered survey and provided consent for a chart review. We collected information on respiratory-related symptoms, diagnoses, tests, medications, and specialist visits. Data were analyzed using frequency tabulations in SPSS (version 19.0). In the survey, 95 % (19/20) of the participants reported having at least one respiratory symptom in the past week. Thirteen (13/19, 68.4 %) reported these symptoms as bothersome. Chart review indicated that 12/20 (60 %) had a diagnosis of either asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and four participants (4/20, 20 %) had a diagnosis of both asthma and COPD. Majority of the participants had been prescribed an inhaled medication (survey 16/20, 80 %; chart 12/20, 60 %). We found that 100 % (20/20) of the participants currently smoked tobacco, and 16/20 (80 %) had smoked both tobacco and marijuana prior to smoking crack. Our study suggests that respiratory symptoms and diagnoses of asthma and COPD are prevalent among a group of patients attending an inner-city clinic in Toronto and who also smoke crack. The high prevalence of smoking tobacco and marijuana among our participants is a major confounder for attributing respiratory symptoms to crack smoking alone. This novel pilot study can inform future research evaluating the primary health care management of respiratory disease among crack smokers, with the aim of improving health and health care delivery.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23188552 View in PubMed
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Alaska Native drug users and sexually transmitted disease: results of a five-year study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3064
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(1):47-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
D G Fisher
A M Fenaughty
D M Paschane
H H Cagle
Author Affiliation
IVDU Project ESB-207, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(1):47-57
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Cocaine-Related Disorders - ethnology
Counseling
Crack Cocaine
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Although Alaska has one of the highest rates of alcohol consumption in the U.S., there are very few reports of other drug use in Alaska. This five-year NIDA-funded study sampled out-of-treatment injection drug users (IDUs) and crack cocaine smokers in Anchorage, Alaska. This paper is a summary of results comparing risk behavior for HIV and sexually transmitted disease infection among Alaska Natives (n=216) to non-Natives (primarily Blacks n=394 and Whites n=479) from this study. IDUs and crack cocaine smokers were recruited using a targeted sampling plan. All subjects tested positive to cocaine metabolites, or morphine, using urinalysis, or had visible track marks. Several analyses of this database have indicated that Alaska Native women are at high risk for gonorrhea infection. They are also at risk for HIV infection due to high rates of behavior related to blood-borne disease transmission. We have also found that White men who have sex with both White and Alaska Native women are significantly less likely to use condoms with the Alaska Native women. HIV preventive education efforts aimed at Alaska Native women need to be implemented on a major scale.
PubMed ID
11279553 View in PubMed
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Alcohol as a risk factor for HIV transmission among American Indian and Alaska Native drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3002
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(1):1-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
J A Baldwin
C J Maxwell
A M Fenaughty
R T Trotter
S J Stevens
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Physical Education, Exercise Science and Nutrition, NAU P.O. Box 15095, Flagstaff, AZ 86011, USA. Julie.Baldwin@nau.edu
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(1):1-16
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - psychology
Alcoholism - ethnology - psychology
Cocaine-Related Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Crack Cocaine
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - transmission
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology
Male
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk-Taking
Safe Sex - psychology
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - ethnology - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Abstract
Quantitative alcohol interviews conducted as part of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Native American Supplement revealed very high rates of alcohol use among American Indian and Alaska Native active crack and injection drug users (IDUs). Of 147 respondents who completed the alcohol questionnaire, 100& percent had drunk alcohol within the past month, almost 42& percent reported that they drank every day, and 50& percent drank until they were drunk one-half of the time or more. Injection drug users (IDUs) demonstrated the highest frequency and quantity of alcohol use in the past 30 days. A significant positive association was also found between crack and alcohol use in the past 48 hours (c(2)=5.30, p
PubMed ID
11279550 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Urinary Biomarkers for Smoking Crack Cocaine: Results of a Danish Laboratory Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271559
Source
J Anal Toxicol. 2015 Jul-Aug;39(6):451-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hans Henrik Jeppesen
Malthe Busch-Nielsen
Anders Nørgaard Larsen
Torben Breindahl
Source
J Anal Toxicol. 2015 Jul-Aug;39(6):451-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - urine
Cocaine - urine
Crack Cocaine - urine
Denmark
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Humans
Substance Abuse Detection - methods
Abstract
Crack cocaine (free-base cocaine) smokers belong to a subgroup of marginalized drug users exposed to severe health risks and great social harm. Detection of the urinary, pyrolytic biomarker methylecgonidine (MED) and its metabolite ecgonidine (ED) secures an unambiguous confirmation of crack cocaine smoking. Although prevalence studies of cocaine based upon self-reporting may not be accurate, laboratory analysis is seldom used for neither diagnostic purpose nor early identification of crack cocaine smoking, which is far more severe than snorting cocaine. A new analytical method was validated for MED, ED and other relevant cocaine metabolites using automated liquid handling and column switching coupled to liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Limit of quantification was 30 ng/mL for ED and MED. This method was applied in a laboratory study of urine samples (n = 110) from cocaine users in Denmark subjected to routine drugs-of-abuse testing. Crack cocaine smoking was confirmed by the presence of MED and/or ED. Eighty-four samples (76.4%) were found positive for crack cocaine smoking in this group of problematic cocaine users. MED was only detected in 5.9% of the positive samples. The study shows a prevalence 3-fold higher to that recently suggested by European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction. We therefore advocate that the urinary biomarkers MED and ED are included in routine testing methods for clinical toxicology. This may lead to an earlier identification of crack cocaine smoking and possibly prevent a more severe drug use.
PubMed ID
25868555 View in PubMed
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An examination of injection drug use trends in Victoria and Vancouver, BC after the closure of Victoria's only fixed-site needle and syringe programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127571
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2012 Jul;23(4):338-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Andrew Ivsins
Clifton Chow
Scott Macdonald
Tim Stockwell
Kate Vallance
David C Marsh
Warren Michelow
Cameron Duff
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, University Victoria, PO Box 1700 STN CSC, Victoria, BCV8Y 2E4, Canada. aivsins@uvic.ca
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2012 Jul;23(4):338-40
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cocaine-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Crack Cocaine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Harm Reduction
Health Facility Closure
Humans
Needle Sharing - statistics & numerical data
Needle-Exchange Programs - supply & distribution
Public Health
Risk-Taking
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
Needle and syringe programmes (NSPs) have been established as effective harm reduction initiatives to reduce injection drug use (IDU)-related risk behaviours, including sharing needles. On May 31, 2008, Victoria, BC's only fixed site NSP was shut down due to community and political pressure. This study examines and compares IDU trends in Victoria with those in Vancouver, BC, a city which has not experienced any similar disruption of IDU-related public health measures.
Quantitative and qualitative data were collected by interviewer-administered questionnaires conducted with injection drug users (n=579) in Victoria and Vancouver between late 2007 and late 2010.
Needle sharing increased in Victoria from under 10% in early 2008 to 20% in late 2010, whilst rates remained relatively low in Vancouver. Participants in Victoria were significantly more likely to share needles than participants in Vancouver. Qualitative data collected in Victoria highlight the difficulty participants have experienced obtaining clean needles since the NSP closed. Recent injection of crack cocaine was independently associated with needle sharing.
The closure of Victoria's fixed site NSP has likely resulted in increased engagement in high-risk behaviours, specifically needle sharing. Our findings highlight the contribution of NSPs as an essential public health measure.
PubMed ID
22280916 View in PubMed
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Assessing service and treatment needs and barriers of youth who use illicit and non-medical prescription drugs in Northern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307857
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(12):e0225548
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2019
Author
Cayley Russell
Maria Neufeld
Pamela Sabioni
Thepikaa Varatharajan
Farihah Ali
Sarah Miles
Joanna Henderson
Benedikt Fischer
Jürgen Rehm
Author Affiliation
Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(12):e0225548
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analgesics, Opioid - adverse effects
Cocaine - adverse effects
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Crack Cocaine - adverse effects
Female
Focus Groups - methods
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Rural Health Services
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - therapy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Illicit drug use rates are high among Canadian youth, and are particularly pronounced in Northern Ontario. The availability and accessibility of effective substance use-related treatments and services are required to address this problem, especially among rural and remote Northern communities. In order to assess specific service and treatment needs, as well as barriers and deterrents to accessing and utilizing services and treatments for youth who use illicit drugs in Northern Ontario, we conducted the present study.
This study utilized a mixed-methods design and incorporated a community-based participatory research approach. Questionnaires were administered in conjunction with audio-recorded semi-structured interviews and/or focus groups with youth (aged 14-25) who live in Northern Ontario and use illicit drugs. Interviews with 'key informants' who work with the youth in each community were also conducted. Between August and December 2017, the research team traveled to Northern Ontario communities and carried out data collection procedures.
A total of 102 youth and 35 key informants from eleven different Northern Ontario communities were interviewed. The most commonly used drugs were prescription opioids, cocaine and crack-cocaine. Most participants experienced problems related to their drug use, and reported 'fair' mental and physical health status. Qualitative analyses highlighted an overall lack of services; barriers to accessing treatment and services included lack of motivation, stigmatization, long wait-lists and transportation/mobility issues. Articulated needs revolved around the necessity of harm reduction-based services, low-threshold programs, specialized programming, and peer-based counselling.
Although each community varied in terms of drug use behaviors and available services, an overall need for youth-specific, low-threshold services was identified. Information gathered from this study can be used to help inform rural and remote communities towards improving treatment and service system performance and provision.
PubMed ID
31805082 View in PubMed
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The changing landscape of crack cocaine use and HIV infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147860
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Oct 27;181(9):571-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-27-2009
Author
David Celentano
Susan G Sherman
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. dcelenta@jhsph.edu
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Oct 27;181(9):571-2
Date
Oct-27-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cocaine-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Crack Cocaine - adverse effects
Female
HIV Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk-Taking
Sex Distribution
Sexual Behavior
Urban Population
Notes
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Comment On: CMAJ. 2009 Oct 27;181(9):585-919841052
PubMed ID
19841049 View in PubMed
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Crack across Canada: Comparing crack users and crack non-users in a Canadian multi-city cohort of illicit opioid users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166164
Source
Addiction. 2006 Dec;101(12):1760-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Benedikt Fischer
Jürgen Rehm
Jayadeep Patra
Kate Kalousek
Emma Haydon
Mark Tyndall
Nady El-Guebaly
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health/Univrersity of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. benedikt.fischer@utoronto.ca
Source
Addiction. 2006 Dec;101(12):1760-70
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cocaine-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Crack Cocaine
Crime
Female
HIV Antibodies - analysis
Health status
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Street Drugs
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine possible differences between crack users and crack non-users across Canada.
Cohort study of illicit opioid and other drug users in five cities across Canada.
Vancouver, Edmonton, Toronto, Montreal and Quebec City, Canada.
Regular illicit opioid and other street drug users not in treatment at time of assessment.
Participants (n = 677) were assessed at baseline (2002) by way of an interviewer-administered questionnaire, a psychiatric diagnostic instrument (Composite International Diagnostic Interview), and salivary antibody tests for infectious disease.
Approximately half the sample had used crack in the past 30 days, although prevalence rates differed strongly between study sites. When examined by discriminant analysis, crack users in the study population were more likely to have: no permanent housing, have illegal and sex work income, indicate physical health problems and hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies, use walk-in clinics, use heroin and to have been arrested and in detention (in past year). They were less likely to report depressive symptoms, and use Dilaudid (hydromorphone) and alcohol.
These results illustrate crack users' pronounced social marginalization (as expressed by homelessness and high involvement in illegal activities) as well as extensive health problems compared to non-crack users in the Canadian context. The development of targeted interventions-addressing the dynamics of social marginalization-of this population is urgently needed.
PubMed ID
17156175 View in PubMed
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The crack cocaine problem. A warning from North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8207
Source
Nord Med. 1992;107(12):321-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
T. Ostbye
E. Crosse
Author Affiliation
Dept of epidemiology and biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Nord Med. 1992;107(12):321-3
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - etiology
Crack Cocaine - pharmacology
Humans
North America - epidemiology
Psychoses, Substance-Induced - etiology
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - etiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
This article describes crack cocaine and its adverse clinical and public health effects. Although crack cocaine does not yet constitute a major drug problem in the Nordic countries, heed should be paid to North America where crack cocaine has developed into a serious and widespread problem only a few years after its introduction. In spite of highly publicized efforts to limit its spread, after a small decline in 1990, the use of crack cocaine is once again increasing. Strong efforts should therefore be made to keep this substance away from the Nordic countries.
PubMed ID
1465349 View in PubMed
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Crack use as a public health problem in Canada: call for an evaluation of 'safer crack use kits'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174644
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):185-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Emma Haydon
Benedikt Fischer
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):185-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Canada - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Crack Cocaine - administration & dosage - toxicity
Equipment Contamination - prevention & control
Evidence-Based Medicine
Harm Reduction
Health Behavior
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Lip - injuries - microbiology
Politics
Prevalence
Public Health Practice
Risk-Taking
Smoking - adverse effects
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Oral crack use (smoking) is a relatively neglected public health problem in Canada, in comparison to injection drug use (IDU). There are indications that crack use in Canada may be increasing. Crack smoking involves particular risks and harms, including possible infectious disease transmission, which underline the need for targeted interventions. One pragmatic grassroots intervention that has only recently begun or been discussed in several Canadian cities is the distribution of 'safer crack use kits', which provide hardware for crack smoking devices along with harm reduction information. In addition to the direct benefits of using them, the kits may also bring previously 'hidden' marginalized crack smokers in contact with health and social services. There has been considerable controversy with regards to the distribution of the crack kits, within criminal justice, public health, and the general public; this resistance appears quite similar to that experienced when needle exchange programs (NEPs) were first being established. Systematic evaluation of the crack kits is urgently needed in order to produce definitive evidence of their health and other benefits, and to allow for evidence-based program and policy decisions in the interest of public health.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2005 Nov-Dec;96(6):450, 47416350871
PubMed ID
15913081 View in PubMed
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45 records – page 1 of 5.