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Abdominal massage for people with constipation: a cost utility analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142788
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1719-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Kristina Lämås
Lars Lindholm
Birgitta Engström
Catrine Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden. kristina.lamas@nurs.umu.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1719-29
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Constipation - economics - physiopathology - therapy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Laxatives - economics - therapeutic use
Male
Massage - economics - nursing
Middle Aged
Patient Dropouts
Patient Education as Topic
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Regression Analysis
Self Care - economics
Sweden
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study conducted to evaluate change in health-related quality of life for people with constipation receiving abdominal massage and to estimate the cost-effectiveness of two alternative scenarios developed from the original trial.
Constipation is a common problem and is associated with decrease in quality of life. Abdominal massage appears to decrease the severity of gastrointestinal symptoms, but its impact on health-related quality of life has not been assessed.
A randomized controlled trial including 60 participants was conducted in Sweden between 2005 and 2007. The control group continued using laxatives as before and the intervention group received additional abdominal massage. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the EQ-5D and analyzed with linear regression. Two scenarios were outlined to conduct a cost utility analysis. In the self-massage scenario patients learned to give self-massage, and in the professional massage scenario patients in hospital received abdominal massage from an Enrolled Nurse.
Linear regression analysis showed that health-related quality of life was statistically significantly increased after 8 weeks of abdominal massage. About 40% were estimated to receive good effect. For 'self-massage', the cost per quality adjusted life year was euro75,000 for the first 16 weeks. For every additional week of abdominal massage, the average dropped and eventually approached euro8300. For 'professional massage', the cost per quality adjusted life year was euro60,000 and eventually dropped to euro28,000.
Abdominal massage may be cost-effective in the long-term and it is relevant to consider it when managing constipation. A crucial aspect will be to identify those who will benefit.
PubMed ID
20557387 View in PubMed
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[A blood transfusion in Sweden--the societal cost].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166918
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Sep 20-26;103(38):2752-6
Publication Type
Article

[A care program for primary health care: improved care of patients with dyspepsia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210802
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Oct 30;93(44):3892-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1996
Author
B. Lennholm
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Oct 30;93(44):3892-6
Date
Oct-30-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Dyspepsia - diagnosis - economics - therapy
Humans
Patient Care Planning
Primary Health Care - economics
Sweden
PubMed ID
8965575 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acidification remediation alternatives: exploring the temporal dimension with cost benefit analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143359
Source
Ambio. 2010 Feb;39(1):40-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Göran Bostedt
Stefan Löfgren
Sophia Innala
Kevin Bishop
Author Affiliation
Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 901 83 Umeå, Sweden. goran.bostedt@sekon.slu.se
Source
Ambio. 2010 Feb;39(1):40-8
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - economics
Environmental Remediation - economics
Fresh Water - analysis - chemistry
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Socioeconomic Factors
Soil - analysis
Sulfur Compounds
Sweden
Time Factors
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects - economics
Abstract
Acidification of soils and surface waters caused by acid deposition is still a major problem in southern Scandinavia, despite clear signs of recovery. Besides emission control, liming of lakes, streams, and wetlands is currently used to ameliorate acidification in Sweden. An alternative strategy is forest soil liming to restore the acidified upland soils from which much acidified runoff originates. This cost-benefit analysis compared these liming strategies with a special emphasis on the time perspective for expected benefits. Benefits transfer was used to estimate use values for sport ffishing and nonuse values in terms of existence values. The results show that large-scale forest soil liming is not socioeconomically profitable, while lake liming is, if it is done efficiently-in other words, if only acidified surface waters are treated. The beguiling logic of "solving" an environmental problem at its source (soils), rather than continuing to treat the symptoms (surface waters), is thus misleading.
Notes
Cites: Nature. 2007 Nov 22;450(7169):537-4018033294
PubMed ID
20496651 View in PubMed
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[A computer professor questions computerization: the projects will become institutions which no-one can evaluate]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68972
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jan 22;94(4):204-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-1997
Author
H. Fällman
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jan 22;94(4):204-6
Date
Jan-22-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Computers
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Evaluation Studies
Medical Informatics
Sweden
Telemedicine
PubMed ID
9053640 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adding formoterol to budesonide in moderate asthma--health economic results from the FACET study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10200
Source
Respir Med. 2001 Jun;95(6):505-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
F. Andersson
E. Stahl
P J Barnes
C G Löfdahl
P M O'Byrne
R A Pauwels
D S Postma
A E Tattersfield
A. Ullman
Author Affiliation
AstraZeneca R&D Lund, Sweden. fredrik.l.andersson@astrazeneca.com
Source
Respir Med. 2001 Jun;95(6):505-12
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - economics
Budesonide - economics - therapeutic use
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Drug Therapy, Combination
Ethanolamines - economics - therapeutic use
Great Britain
Health Care Costs
Humans
Middle Aged
Normal Distribution
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spain
Sweden
Abstract
The FACET (Formoterol and Corticosteroid Establishing Therapy) study established that there is a clear clinical benefit in adding formoterol to budesonide therapy in patients who have persistent symptoms of asthma despite treatment with low to moderate doses of an inhaled corticosteroid. We combined the clinical results from the FACET study with an expert survey on average resource use in connection with mild and severe asthma exacerbations in the U.K., Sweden and Spain. The primary objective of this study was to assess the health economics of adding the inhaled long-acting beta2-agonist formoterol to the inhaled corticosteroid budesonide in the treatment of asthma. The extra costs of adding the inhaled beta2-agonist formoterol to the corticosteroid budesonide in asthmatic patients in Sweden were offset by savings from reduced use of resources for exacerbations. For Spain the picture was mixed. Adding formoterol to low dose budesonide generated savings, whereas for moderate doses of budesonide about 75% of the extra formoterol costs could be recouped. In the U.K., other savings offset about half of the extra cost of formoterol. All cost-effectiveness ratios are within accepted cost-effectiveness ranges reported from previous studies. If productivity losses were included, there were net savings in all three countries, ranging from Euro 267-1183 per patient per year. In conclusion, adding the inhaled, long-acting beta2-agonist formoterol to low-moderate doses of the inhaled corticosteroid budesonide generated significant gains in all outcome measures with partial or complete offset of costs. Adding formoterol to budesonide can thus be considered to be cost-effective.
PubMed ID
11421509 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aflibercept vs. Ranibizumab: cost-effectiveness of treatment for wet age-related macular degeneration in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279115
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2016 Aug;94(5):441-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Hemangi R Panchmatia
Karen M Clements
Erin Hulbert
Marianne Eriksson
Kim Wittrup-Jensen
Jonas Nilsson
Milton C Weinstein
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2016 Aug;94(5):441-8
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiogenesis Inhibitors - administration & dosage - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Health Care Costs
Humans
Intravitreal Injections
Male
Markov Chains
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Ranibizumab - administration & dosage - economics
Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor - administration & dosage
Recombinant Fusion Proteins - administration & dosage - economics
Sweden
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A - antagonists & inhibitors
Visual Acuity - drug effects
Wet Macular Degeneration - drug therapy - economics
Abstract
Monthly dosing with ranibizumab (RBZ) is needed to achieve maximal visual gains in patients with neovascular ('wet') age-related macular degeneration (wAMD). In Sweden, dosing is performed as needed (RBZ PRN), resulting in suboptimal efficacy. Intravitreal aflibercept (IVT-AFL) every 2 months after three initial monthly doses was clinically equivalent to RBZ monthly dosing (RBZ q4) in wAMD clinical trials. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of IVT-AFL versus RBZ q4 and RBZ PRN in Sweden.
A Markov model compared IVT-AFL to RBZ q4 or RBZ PRN over 2 years. Health states were based on visual acuity in better-seeing eye; a proportion discontinued treatment monthly or upon visual acuity
PubMed ID
27061020 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age gradient in the cost-effectiveness of bicycle helmets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32744
Source
Prev Med. 2000 May;30(5):401-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
B. Kopjar
T M Wickizer
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health Sciences, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. branko.kopjar@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
Prev Med. 2000 May;30(5):401-6
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Bicycling - economics
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Craniocerebral Trauma - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Head Protective Devices - economics - standards
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study analyzed the reduction in risk of head injuries associated with use of bicycle helmets among persons ages 3 to 70 and the cost-effectiveness of helmet use based on this estimated risk reduction. METHODS: To derive our cost-effectiveness estimates, we combined injury incidence data gathered through a detailed and comprehensive injury registration system in Norway, acute medical treatment cost information for the Norwegian health service, and information reported in the scientific literature regarding the health protective effects of helmet use. The analysis included all cases of head injuries reported through the registration system from 1990 through 1996. We performed an age-stratified analysis to determine the incidence of bicycle-related head injuries, the 5-year reduction in absolute risk of injury, the number needed to treat, and the cost-effectiveness of helmet use. To test the robustness of the findings to parameter assumptions, we performed sensitivity analysis. RESULTS: The risk of head injury was highest among children aged 5 to 16. The greatest reduction in absolute risk of head injury, 1.0 to 1.4% over 5 years estimated helmet lifetime, occurred among children who started using a helmet between the ages of 3 and 13. Estimates indicate that it would cost approximately U.S. $2,200 in bicycle helmet expenses to prevent any one upper head injury in children ages 3-13. In contrast, it would cost U.S. $10,000-25,000 to avoid a single injury among adults. CONCLUSIONS: Bicycle safety helmets appear to be several times more cost-effective for children than adults, primarily because of the higher risk of head injury among children. Programs aiming to increase helmet use should consider the differences in injury risk and cost-effectiveness among different age groups and target their efforts accordingly.
PubMed ID
10845749 View in PubMed
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[Alternative drugs against Chlamydia urethritis. Tetracycline offers the most cost-effective cure].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212831
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Jan 31;93(5):369-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-1996

[Ambulatory angiography saves money and shortens waiting time].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226160
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jun 26;88(26-27):2380-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-1991
Author
E. Haglind
K. Lundholm
Author Affiliation
Båda vid kirurgiska kliniken, Sahlgrenska sjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jun 26;88(26-27):2380-1
Date
Jun-26-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - economics - methods
Angiography - adverse effects - economics - methods
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Humans
Sweden
Waiting Lists
PubMed ID
1906964 View in PubMed
Less detail

732 records – page 1 of 74.