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13 records – page 1 of 2.

[Ambulatory long-term cardiac rehabilitation--one year results]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49890
Source
Gesundheitswesen. 2001 Mar;63 Suppl 1:S39-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
U. Tegtbur
H. Machold
U. Brinkmeier
M. Busse
Author Affiliation
Sportmedizinisches Zentrum, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover. Tegtbur.Uwe@mh-hannover.de
Source
Gesundheitswesen. 2001 Mar;63 Suppl 1:S39-42
Date
Mar-2001
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ambulatory Care - economics
Behavior Therapy - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
English Abstract
Exercise
Female
Germany
Humans
Long-Term Care - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - economics - rehabilitation
Patient compliance
Abstract
After acute hospital therapy of myocardial infarction or bypass surgery the patient in Germany will be treated using an inpatient rehabilitation programme for 3-4 weeks. One year later only 10% of them are still active in outpatients groups. In our study 61 cardiac patients performed an one-year outpatient rehabilitation (instead of 4 weeks inpatient) programme with intense supervised exercise and behaviour therapy. The money input per patient was the same for the usual care 4 weeks inpatient (6000 DM) as for 1 year outpatient rehabilitation (5800 DM). The exercise capacity per heart rate-blood pressure-product was increased by 43% (p > 0.01) after 12 months. The maximum exercise capacity was reached in the 57th week. Without increased medical treatment, cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were reduced after 12 months by 3.9% down to 195 +/- 25 mg/dl or by 6.6% down to 122 +/- 21 mg/dl, respectively (n.s.). HDL-cholesterol increased by 2.8% to 48 +/- 8 mg/dl (n.s.). This study shows results similar to outpatient rehabilitation programmes in the United States or in Sweden. The long intervention time and the intensity are main factors for the success of cardiac rehabilitation and patient health. Financial resources should primarily be concentrated on long-term outpatient rehabilitation programmes.
PubMed ID
11329918 View in PubMed
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[Chronic heart failure: structural and functional deficit of our health policy?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53293
Source
Verh K Acad Geneeskd Belg. 2004;66(3):173-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
D L Brutsaert
Source
Verh K Acad Geneeskd Belg. 2004;66(3):173-82
Date
2004
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Belgium
Cardiac Output, Low - drug therapy - economics - mortality
Cost-Benefit Analysis
English Abstract
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Policy - economics - trends
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mortality - trends
Physician's Practice Patterns
Specialism
Abstract
The problems concerning chronic heart failure can be summarized in 4 paradoxes which concern epidemiology, diagnosis, therapy, and financing respectively. Paradox I: The mortality due to chronic heart failure continues to increase worldwide despite a slow but significant decrease in mortality due to acute coronary syndromes. Paradox II: The clinical manifestations of chronic heart failure correlate poorly with the underlying pathophysiological progression. Paradox III: There is a striking discordance between the perception of evidence-based guidelines by the primary care physician and the actual reality in his/her private medical practice. Paradox IV: The inevitable increase in financial cost contrasts sharply with the many desperate attempts for cost reduction by the government. Solution: Heart Failure Clinic. Since the introduction of the first heart failure clinics in Sweden in 1990, numerous studies in various countries have emphasized the medical-cardiological and economical benefit of such organizations, mainly as a result of a substantial reduction of more than 40% in hospitalization. Moreover, a more central role is attributed to the primary care general practicioner.
PubMed ID
15315118 View in PubMed
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[Clinical aspects of prenatal prevention of rhesus incompatibility]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59685
Source
Beitr Infusionsther. 1992;30:425-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
D H Maas
Author Affiliation
Gynäkologisch-geburtshilfliche Abteilung des Kreiskrankenhauses Schwäbisch Gmünd, Mutlangen, BRD.
Source
Beitr Infusionsther. 1992;30:425-30
Date
1992
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic - administration & dosage
Cost-Benefit Analysis
English Abstract
Erythroblastosis, Fetal - blood - economics - prevention & control
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Immunoglobulin D - immunology
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - economics
Rh Isoimmunization - blood - economics - prevention & control
Rh-Hr Blood-Group System - blood
Abstract
The postnatal treatment with anti-D immunoglobulin to prevent rhesus sensitization is successful in about 90% of all rhesus-negative mothers at risk. Failures derive mostly from large fetomaternal hemorrhages during the last months of pregnancy. Studies from Canada, Great Britain and Sweden have shown that the injection of an additional dosage of anti-D during the 28th to 34th week of pregnancy results in a further 90% reduction of the failure rate. Although there is only a limited number of cases of hemolytic diseases in the newborn, the cost-effect ratio of this prophylactic treatment calculated for the Federal Republic of Germany shows not only a medical but also an economic benefit.
PubMed ID
1284752 View in PubMed
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[Effect of medicamentous cholesterol control on resources utilization in public health--significance of the Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4-S Study) for cost control in Swiss health management conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206759
Source
Schweiz Med Wochenschr. 1997 Nov 1;127(44):1819-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-1997
Author
T D Szucs
T F Lüscher
F. Gutzwiller
Author Affiliation
Zentrum für Pharmakoökonomie, Universität Mailand.
Source
Schweiz Med Wochenschr. 1997 Nov 1;127(44):1819-23
Date
Nov-1-1997
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy - economics - mortality
Anticholesteremic Agents - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Cost Control - trends
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Forecasting
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Misuse - economics
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - drug therapy - economics - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - economics - mortality
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Simvastatin - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Survival Rate
Switzerland - epidemiology
Abstract
Upward spiralling health care expenditures have triggered the need to assess the cost-effectiveness of medical interventions. Specifically, interventions in primary and secondary prevention represent an important field of research. A resource utilization analysis was performed on the basis of the recently published Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study. It could be shown that treatment with simvastatin compared to placebo leads to a reduction in patient costs of CHF 8.4 million. This represents a reduction of CHF 3770.- per patient. The effective daily treatment costs can thus be calculated at CHF 1.11, which is equivalent to 36% of the actual acquisition cost per day. These results support the notion that secondary coronary prevention is not only justified from a clinical but also from an economic point of view.
Notes
Comment In: Schweiz Med Wochenschr. 1998 Jul 21;128(29-30):1150-19715503
PubMed ID
9446200 View in PubMed
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[Effiency in surgery (author's transl)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251611
Source
Zentralbl Chir. 1976;101(20):1217-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
S. Bengmark
Source
Zentralbl Chir. 1976;101(20):1217-20
Date
1976
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Hospital Departments
Humans
Length of Stay
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Preoperative Care
Surgical Procedures, Operative - standards
Sweden
Abstract
Increase in the cost of medical care force us to adopt "medical rationalisation" instead of as previously "hospital rationalisation". This medical rationalisation constitutes a new, well-thought out way of putting questions about diagnosis, therapy and after-care. We must abandon the opinion that the prestige of a surgical department rests in the number of beds. Instead we must use other yardsticks such as the greater use of ambulant care, the shortest hospital stay for routine operations, the shortest preoperative waiting times and an increased operation frequency. Moreover, we need a diagnosis fixed from the start, a large enough operation capacity and sufficient possibilities for postoperative care, stringency in keeping agreed admittances and discharges as regards elective routine surgery and intimate co-operation between doctors, hospital economists, nursing staff and other experts.
PubMed ID
185845 View in PubMed
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[Is return to work probability diminished by vocational rehabilitation? On microeconometric evaluation on the example of the "Sweden Study"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184868
Source
Rehabilitation (Stuttg). 2003 Jun;42(3):180-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003

[National and regional prioritisation in Swedish health care: experiences from cardiology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121989
Source
Z Evid Fortbild Qual Gesundhwes. 2012;106(6):435-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jörg Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Linnæus University and Medicinska kliniken, Länssjukhuset i Kalmar, Schweden. jorg.carlsson@ltkalmar.se
Source
Z Evid Fortbild Qual Gesundhwes. 2012;106(6):435-42
Date
2012
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - economics - rehabilitation
Cost Savings - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis - economics - organization & administration
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Evidence-Based Medicine - economics - organization & administration
Guideline Adherence - economics - organization & administration
Health Care Rationing - economics - organization & administration
Health Priorities - economics - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Humans
National Health Programs - economics - organization & administration
Regional Health Planning - economics - organization & administration
Sweden
Abstract
Prioritisation of medical services in Sweden takes place on two different levels. On the national level, the Swedish priority guidelines ascribe priority values ranging from 1 (high priority) to 10 (low priority) to measures (in terms of condition-treatment pairs) of prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of cardiovascular diseases. In addition, this list contains interventions that should be avoided and those that should only be provided as part of clinical research projects. The government then commissions a multi-professional team under the supervision of the National Board of Health and Welfare "Socialstyelsen" with the development of corresponding guidelines. In addition to the scientific evidence, the priority lists incorporate ethical and economical aspects and are based on the so-called ethics platform consisting of human dignity, needs, solidarity and cost-effectiveness. At the other level of prioritisation there are regional projects aiming at the in- and exclusion of medical measures. The Swedish prioritisation process will be described using the example of priority lists in cardiology. (As supplied by publisher).
PubMed ID
22857731 View in PubMed
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[Newest results of preventive dentistry in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39692
Source
Phillip J Restaur Zahnmed. 1985 1st Quarter;2(5):9-13
Publication Type
Article

13 records – page 1 of 2.