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Prevalence and cost of epilepsy in Sweden--a register-based approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263823
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2015 Jan;131(1):37-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
K. Bolin
F. Berggren
A-M Landtblom
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2015 Jan;131(1):37-44
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care - economics
Epilepsy - economics - epidemiology
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Prevalence
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To estimate the prevalence of epilepsy, costs associated with in- and outpatient care, drug utilization and productivity losses due to epilepsy in Sweden for the years 2005 and 2011.
Cost components were calculated using registry data on inpatient- and outpatient-care utilization, drug sales and early pensions granted due to permanent disability and mortality. Moreover, by cross-identification of information in healthcare and pharmaceutical registries, we were able to distinguish between pharmaceuticals prescribed for epilepsy and non-epilepsy indications.
The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated at 0.62% in 2005 and 0.88% in 2011. The total cost of epilepsy increased during the same period, while the per-patient cost decreased from €2929 to €1729. Direct medical costs accounted for about 36% of the estimated total cost in 2005 and 60% in 2011. The estimated healthcare cost due to epilepsy as a share of total healthcare costs for all illnesses was about the same in 2005 as in 2011 (0.2%), while the corresponding pharmaceutical cost increased from about 0.5% in 2005 to almost 1% in 2011.
The per-patient cost of epilepsy is substantial, implying a significant aggregated cost incurred on society (despite a prevalence
PubMed ID
25195857 View in PubMed
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Mussels as a tool for mitigation of nutrients in the marine environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264320
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2014 May 15;82(1-2):137-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2014
Author
Jens Kjerulf Petersen
Berit Hasler
Karen Timmermann
Pernille Nielsen
Ditte Bruunshøj Tørring
Martin Mørk Larsen
Marianne Holmer
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2014 May 15;82(1-2):137-43
Date
May-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Aquaculture - economics - methods
Biomass
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark
Environmental Restoration and Remediation - economics - methods
Eutrophication
Metals, Heavy - metabolism
Mytilus edulis - metabolism
Nitrogen - metabolism
Phosphorus - metabolism
Water Pollution, Chemical - prevention & control
Abstract
Long-line mussel farming has been proposed as a mitigation tool for removal of excess nutrients in eutrophic coastal waters. A full-scale mussel farm optimized for cost efficient nutrient removal was established in the eutrophic Skive Fjord, Denmark where biological and economic parameters related to nutrient removal was monitored throughout a full production cycle (1 yr). The results showed that it was possible to obtain a high area specific biomass of 60 t WW ha(-1) eqvivalent to a nitrogen and phosphorus removal of 0.6-0.9 and 0.03-0.04 t ha(-1)yr, respectively. The analysis of the costs related to establishment, maintenance and harvest revealed that mussel production optimized for mitigation can be carried out at a lower cost compared to mussel production for (human) consumption. The costs for nutrient removal was 14.8 € kg(-1)N making mitigation mussel production a cost-efficient measure compared to the most expensive land-based measures.
PubMed ID
24673831 View in PubMed
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The effects and costs of the universal parent group program - all children in focus: a study protocol for a randomized wait-list controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264338
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:688
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lene Lindberg
Malin Ulfsdotter
Camilla Jalling
Eva Skärstrand
Maria Lalouni
Kajsa Lönn Rhodin
Anna Månsdotter
Pia Enebrink
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:688
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Behavior
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Health Promotion - economics - methods
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - prevention & control
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Parents
Prospective Studies
Research Design
Sweden
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In recent decades, parents have been involved in programs that aim to improve parenting style and reduce child behavior problems. Research of preventive parenting programs has shown that these interventions generally have a positive influence on both parents and children. However, to our knowledge there is a gap in the scientific literature when it comes to randomized controlled trials of brief, manual-based structured programs which address general parenting among the population, and focus on promoting health. A four-session universal health promotion parent group program named All Children in Focus was developed. It aims at promoting parental competence and children's positive development with the parent-child relationship as the target. There is currently no randomized controlled trial existing of the program.
A prospective multicenter randomized wait-list controlled trial is being conducted. Approximately 600 parents with children ranging in age from 3-12 years have been recruited in eleven municipalities and city districts in the County of Stockholm, Sweden. Parents are randomized at baseline to an intervention group, which receives the program directly, or to a waiting-list control group, which participates in the program six months later. Changes in parenting and child health and development are assessed with measures immediately post-intervention and six months after the baseline. Observations of a minor group of parents and children are conducted to explore possible relations between parental reports and observed behaviors, as well as changes in the interaction between parent and child. Further, data collected within the evaluation will also be applied to evaluate the possible cost-effectiveness of the program.
This paper describes a study protocol of a randomized controlled trial. Except for the quantitative outcome measures to evaluate the effectiveness of All Children in Focus, this protocol also describes health economic and qualitative analyses to deepen the knowledge of the program. We further discuss some issues regarding the implementation of the program in municipalities and city districts.
Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN70202532.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23890316 View in PubMed
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Balancing the benefits and costs of traditional food substitution by indigenous Arctic women of childbearing age: Impacts on persistent organic pollutant, mercury, and nutrient intakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289991
Source
Environ Int. 2016 09; 94:554-566
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2016
Author
Matthew J Binnington
Meredith S Curren
Hing Man Chan
Frank Wania
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4, Canada.
Source
Environ Int. 2016 09; 94:554-566
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diet - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - analysis - economics - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Female
Food chain
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Abstract
For indigenous Arctic Canadians, traditional food consumption represents a key source of nutrients and environmental contaminants. Particularly, ingestion of marine mammal blubber and meat may lead to persistent organic pollutant levels and mercury intakes that exceed regulatory thresholds for sensitive populations. We investigated whether temporary adjustments to the consumption of traditional food derived from marine mammals appreciably impacted contaminant exposure and nutrient intakes among indigenous women of childbearing age. Such adjustments can be motivated by the desire to lower contaminant exposure or to increase nutrition, or by the diminishing availability of other traditional food sources. We combined the contaminant fate and transport model GloboPOP with the food chain bioaccumulation model ACC-Human Arctic to simulate polychlorinated biphenyl exposures in female 2007-08 Inuit Health Survey participants. We also calculated daily mercury and nutrient intake rates. Our results suggest that a temporary decrease in marine mammal consumption is largely ineffective at reducing exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls, because of their long elimination half-lives. In contrast, substitution of marine mammals was highly efficient at reducing mercury intake, but also appreciably lowered intakes of iron, manganese, selenium, and ?-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The impact of increasing intake of traditional food derived from marine mammals during childbearing age greatly depended on baseline consumption rates; replacement is ill-advised for those who already consume a lot of traditional food due to greater polychlorinated biphenyl and mercury exposures, while replacement was potentially beneficial for those with very limited marine mammal consumption due to increased nutrient intakes. Our calculations primarily suggest that considering baseline traditional food intake rates is critical to devising reproductive dietary adjustment strategies that maximize nutrient intake while minimizing environmental contaminant exposure.
PubMed ID
27329691 View in PubMed
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Building COPD care on shaky ground: a mixed methods study from Swedish primary care professional perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290073
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 07 10; 17(1):467
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-10-2017
Author
Sara Lundell
Malin Tistad
Börje Rehn
Maria Wiklund
Åsa Holmner
Karin Wadell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. sara.lundell@umu.se.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 07 10; 17(1):467
Date
07-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Communication
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - therapy
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a public health problem. Interprofessional collaboration and health promotion interventions such as exercise training, education, and behaviour change are cost effective, have a good effect on health status, and are recommended in COPD treatment guidelines. There is a gap between the guidelines and the healthcare available to people with COPD. The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of what shapes the provision of primary care services to people with COPD and what healthcare is offered to them from the perspective of healthcare professionals and managers.
The study was conducted in primary care in a Swedish county council during January to June 2015. A qualitatively driven mixed methods design was applied. Qualitative and quantitative findings were merged into a joint analysis. Interviews for the qualitative component were performed with healthcare professionals (n = 14) from two primary care centres and analysed with qualitative content analysis. Two questionnaires were used for the quantitative component; one was answered by senior managers or COPD nurses at primary care centres (n = 26) in the county council and the other was answered by healthcare professionals (n = 18) at two primary care centres. The questionnaire data were analysed with descriptive statistics.
The analysis gave rise to the overarching theme building COPD care on shaky ground. This represents professionals driven to build a supportive COPD care on 'shaky' organisational ground in a fragmented and non-compliant healthcare organisation. The shaky ground is further represented by uninformed patients with a complex disease, which is surrounded with shame. The professionals are autonomous and pragmatic, used to taking responsibility for their work, and with limited involvement of the management. They wish to provide high quality COPD care with interprofessional collaboration, but they lack competence and are hindered by inadequate routines and lack of resources.
There is a gap between COPD treatment guidelines and the healthcare that is provided in primary care. To facilitate implementation of the guidelines several actions are needed, such as further training for professionals, additional resources, and improved organisational structure for interprofessional collaboration and patient education.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28693473 View in PubMed
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Lost workdays and healthcare use before and after hospital visits due to rotavirus and other gastroenteritis among young children in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290080
Source
Vaccine. 2017 06 16; 35(28):3528-3533
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-16-2017
Author
Christina H Edwards
Terese Bekkevold
Elmira Flem
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Modelling, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: Christina.Hansen.Edwards@fhi.no.
Source
Vaccine. 2017 06 16; 35(28):3528-3533
Date
06-16-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absenteeism
Caregivers
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Gastroenteritis - economics - epidemiology
Hospitalization - economics
Hospitals
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Primary Health Care - economics
Prospective Studies
Rotavirus Infections - economics - epidemiology
Vaccination - economics
Abstract
Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination is affected by assumptions used in health economic evaluations. To inform such evaluations, we assessed healthcare use before and after hospitalisations due to rotavirus and other acute gastroenteritis (AGE) among children
PubMed ID
28545926 View in PubMed
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The TECH@HOME study, a technological intervention to reduce caregiver burden for informal caregivers of people with dementia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290259
Source
Trials. 2017 02 09; 18(1):63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-09-2017
Author
Agneta Malmgren Fänge
Steven M Schmidt
Maria H Nilsson
Gunilla Carlsson
Anna Liwander
Caroline Dahlgren Bergström
Paolo Olivetti
Per Johansson
Carlos Chiatti
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Centre (HSC), Lund University, Baravägen 3, 222 41, Lund, Sweden. agneta.malmgren_fange@med.lu.se.
Source
Trials. 2017 02 09; 18(1):63
Date
02-09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Caregivers - psychology
Cognition
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Dementia - diagnosis - economics - psychology - therapy
Equipment Design
Health Care Costs
Humans
Medical Informatics - economics - instrumentation
Protective Devices - economics
Quality of Life
Remote Sensing Technology - economics
Research Design
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Telemedicine - economics - instrumentation
Text Messaging
Time Factors
Transducers, Pressure - economics
Abstract
It is estimated that global dementia rates will more than triple by 2050 and result in a staggering economic burden on families and societies. Dementia carries significant physical, psychological and social challenges for individuals and caregivers. Informal caregiving is common and increasing as more people with dementia are being cared for at home instead of in nursing homes. Caregiver burden is associated with lower perceived health, lower social coherence, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the effects of information and communication technology (ICT) on caregiver burden among informal caregivers of people with dementia by reducing the need for supervision.
This randomized controlled trial aims to recruit 320 dyads composed of people with dementia living in community settings and their primary informal caregivers. In the intervention group, people with dementia will have a home monitoring kit installed in their home while dyads in the control group will receive usual care. The ICT kit includes home-leaving sensors, smoke and water leak sensors, bed sensors, and automatic lights that monitor the individual's behavior. Alerts (text message and/or phone call) will be sent to the caregiver if anything unusual occurs. All study dyads will receive three home visits by project administrators who have received project-specific training in order to harmonize data collection. Home visits will take place at enrollment and 3 and 12 months following installation of the ICT kit. At every home visit, a standardized questionnaire will be administered to all dyads to assess their health, quality of life and resource utilization. The primary outcome of this trial is the amount of informal care support provided by primary informal caregivers to people with dementia.
This is the first randomized controlled trial exploring the implementation of ICT for people with dementia in a large sample in Sweden and one of the first at the international level. Results hold the potential to inform regional and national policy-makers in Sweden and beyond about the cost-effectiveness of ICT and its impact on caregiver burden.
ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02733939 . Registered on 10 March 2016.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28183323 View in PubMed
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Multilocus sequence analysis reveals extensive genetic variety within Tenacibaculum spp. associated with ulcers in sea-farmed fish in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290385
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2017 Jun; 205:39-45
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Anne Berit Olsen
Snorre Gulla
Terje Steinum
Duncan J Colquhoun
Hanne K Nilsen
Eric Duchaud
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Veterinary Institute, P.O. Box 1263 Sentrum, 5811 Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: anne-berit.olsen@vetinst.no.
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2017 Jun; 205:39-45
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Aquaculture
Bacterial Typing Techniques - veterinary
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Fishes
Flavobacteriaceae Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Genes, Essential - genetics
Genetic Variation
Genotyping Techniques - veterinary
Multilocus Sequence Typing - veterinary
Norway - epidemiology
Phylogeny
Skin Ulcer - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Tenacibaculum - genetics - isolation & purification
Time Factors
Abstract
Skin ulcer development in sea-reared salmonids, commonly associated with Tenacibaculum spp., is a significant fish welfare- and economical problem in Norwegian aquaculture. A collection of 89 Tenacibaculum isolates was subjected to multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA). The isolates were retrieved from outbreaks of clinical disease in farms spread along the Norwegian coast line from seven different fish species over a period of 19 years. MLSA analysis reveals considerable genetic diversity, but allows identification of four main clades. One clade encompasses isolates belonging to the species T. dicentrarchi, whereas three clades encompass bacteria that likely represent novel, as yet undescribed species. The study identified T. maritimum in lumpsucker, T. ovolyticum in halibut, and has extended the host and geographic range for T. soleae, isolated from wrasse. The overall lack of clonality and host specificity, with some indication of geographical range restriction argue for local epidemics involving multiple strains. The diversity of Tenacibaculum isolates from fish displaying ulcerative disease may complicate vaccine development.
PubMed ID
28622859 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of telehealthcare to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: results from the Danish 'TeleCare North' cluster-randomised trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290394
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 05 17; 7(5):e014616
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
05-17-2017
Author
Flemming Witt Udsen
Pernille Heyckendorff Lilholt
Ole Hejlesen
Lars Ehlers
Author Affiliation
Danish Centre for Healthcare Improvements, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 05 17; 7(5):e014616
Date
05-17-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Aged
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - economics - therapy
Quality of Life
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Respiratory Function Tests
Telemedicine - economics
Abstract
To investigate the cost-effectiveness of a telehealthcare solution in addition to usual care compared with usual care.
A 12-month cost-utility analysis conducted alongside a cluster-randomised trial.
Community-based setting in the geographical area of North Denmark Region in Denmark.
26 municipality districts define randomisation clusters with 13 districts in each arm. 1225 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were enrolled, of which 578 patients were randomised to telehealthcare and 647 to usual care.
In addition to usual care, patients in the intervention group received a set of telehealthcare equipment and were monitored by a municipality-based healthcare team. Patients in the control group received usual care.
Incremental costs per quality-adjusted life-years gained from baseline up to 12 months follow-up.
From a healthcare and social sector perspective, the adjusted mean difference in total costs between telehealthcare and usual care was €728 (95% CI -754 to 2211) and the adjusted mean difference in quality-adjusted life-years gained was 0.0132 (95% CI -0.0083 to 0.0346). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was €55?327 per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Decision-makers should be willing to pay more than €55?000 to achieve a probability of cost-effectiveness >50%. This conclusion is robust to changes in the definition of hospital contacts and reduced intervention costs. Only in the most optimistic scenario combining the effects of all sensitivity analyses, does the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio fall below the UK thresholds values (€21?068 per quality-adjusted life-year).
Telehealthcare is unlikely to be a cost-effective addition to usual care, if it is offered to all patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and if the willingness-to-pay threshold values from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence are applied.
Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01984840, 14 November 2013.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28515193 View in PubMed
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Utility of registries for post-marketing evaluation of medicines. A survey of Swedish health care quality registries from a regulatory perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290728
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2017 Jun; 122(2):136-147
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Nils Feltelius
Rolf Gedeborg
Lennart Holm
Björn Zethelius
Author Affiliation
a Swedish Medical Products Agency , Uppsala , Sweden.
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2017 Jun; 122(2):136-147
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Decision Making
Hospitalization
Humans
Marketing
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing
Quality of Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Registries
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe content and procedures in some selected Swedish health care quality registries (QRs) of relevance to regulatory decision-making.
A workshop was organized with participation of seven Swedish QRs which subsequently answered a questionnaire regarding registry content on drug treatments and outcomes. Patient populations, coverage, data handling and quality control, as well as legal and ethical aspects are presented. Scientific publications from the QRs are used as a complementary measure of quality and scientific relevance.
The registries under study collect clinical data of high relevance to regulatory and health technology agencies. Five out of seven registries provide information on the drug of interest. When applying external quality criteria, we found a high degree of fulfillment, although information on medication was not sufficient to answer all questions of regulatory interest. A notable strength is the option for linkage to the Prescribed Drug Registry and to information on education and socioeconomic status. Data on drugs used during hospitalization were also collected to some extent. Outcome measures collected resemble those used in relevant clinical trials. All registries collected patient-reported outcome measures. The number of publications from the registries was substantial, with studies of appropriate design, including randomized registry trials.
Quality registries may provide a valuable source of post-marketing data on drug effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness. Closer collaboration between registries and regulators to improve quality and usefulness of registry data could benefit both regulatory utility and value for health care providers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28276780 View in PubMed
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