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2775 records – page 1 of 278.

Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Apr 30;117(11):1582-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1997
Author
H E Danielsen
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for patologi det Norske Radiumhospital, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Apr 30;117(11):1582-3
Date
Apr-30-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Norway
Telemedicine - economics
PubMed ID
9198937 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Feb 15;130(4):341
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1984
Author
D L Mowat
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Feb 15;130(4):341
Date
Feb-15-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Humans
Primary Prevention - economics
PubMed ID
6420034 View in PubMed
Less detail

Preparing occupational noise regulations in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243828
Source
Scand Audiol Suppl. 1982;16:61-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
H. Fjerdingstad
Source
Scand Audiol Suppl. 1982;16:61-4
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Humans
Noise
Noise, Occupational
Norway
PubMed ID
6819635 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of the cost-effectiveness of a high- and a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention in Sweden: a randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116364
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2013 Sep;15(9):1519-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Eva Nohlert
Asgeir R Helgason
Per Tillgren
Ake Tegelberg
Pia Johansson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Vastmanland County Hospital Västerås, Västerås, Sweden. eva.nohlert@ltv.se
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2013 Sep;15(9):1519-27
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Humans
Smoking Cessation - economics - methods
Sweden
Abstract
To assess the relative cost-effectiveness of a high-intensity treatment (HIT) and a low-intensity treatment (LIT) for smoking cessation.
The societal and health care perspective economic evaluation was based on the reported number of quitters at 12-month follow-up (point prevalence) from a randomized controlled trial of 2 smoking cessation programs in Sweden. Future disease-related costs (in Swedish kronor [SEK] 2004; SEK7.35 = USD1) and health effects (in quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs]) were estimated via a Markov model comprising lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular disease including stroke with costs and QALYs discounted 3% annually.
HIT was more effective than LIT (23% vs. 16% quitters), but at a considerably higher intervention cost: SEK26,100 versus 9,100 per quitter. The model-estimated societal costs avoided did not balance the higher intervention costs, so the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) amounted to SEK100,000 per QALY for HIT versus LIT. All sensitivity analyses indicated an ICER below SEK300,000 and that HIT is the preferred option if the decision maker willingness-to-pay exceeds SEK50,000 per QALY. Compared with no intervention, LIT was cost saving, whereas HIT was estimated at SEK8,400 per QALY.
Compared with no smoking cessation program, it is a societal waste not to implement the LIT as it is estimated to result in lower societal costs. The incremental cost per QALY gained of SEK100,000 for HIT is considered very cost-effective in Sweden. Thus, if smoking cessation programs are judged in the same manner as other Swedish health care measures, the high-intensity program should be chosen before the low-cost program.
PubMed ID
23404735 View in PubMed
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Cost-efficient assessment of biomechanical exposure in occupational groups, exemplified by posture observation and inclinometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259033
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2014 May 1;40(3):252-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2014
Author
Catherine Trask
Svend Erik Mathiassen
Jens Wahlström
Mikael Forsman
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2014 May 1;40(3):252-65
Date
May-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomechanical Phenomena
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Humans
Occupations
Posture
Sweden
Abstract
This study compared the cost efficiency of observation and inclinometer assessment of trunk and upper-arm inclination in a population of flight baggage handlers, as an illustration of a general procedure for addressing the trade-off between resource consumption and statistical performance in occupational epidemiology.
Trunk and upper-arm inclination with respect to the line of gravity were assessed for three days on each of 27 airport baggage handlers using simultaneous inclinometer and video recordings. Labor and equipment costs associated with data collection and processing were tracked throughout. Statistical performance was computed from the variance components within and between workers and bias (with inclinometer assumed to produce "correct" inclination angles). The behavior of the trade-off between cost and efficiency with changed sample size, as well as with changed logistics for data collection and processing, was investigated using simulations.
At similar total costs, time spent at trunk and arm inclination angles >60 ° as well as 90 (th)percentile arm inclination were estimated at higher precision using inclinometers, while median inclination and 90th percentile trunk inclination was determined more precisely using observation. This hierarchy remained when the study was reproduced in another population, while inclinometry was more cost-efficient than observation for all three posture variables in a scenario where data were already collected and only needed to be processed.
When statistical performance was measured only in terms of precision, inclinometers were more cost-efficient than observation for two out of three posture metrics investigated. Since observations were biased, inclinometers consistently outperformed observation when both bias and precision were included in statistical performance. This general model for assessing cost efficiency may be used for designing exposure assessment strategies with considerations not only of statistical but also cost criteria. The empirical data provide a specific basis for planning assessments of working postures in occupational groups.
PubMed ID
24469242 View in PubMed
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Launching a research initiative: the Canadian Pediatric Epilepsy Network (CPEN).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187523
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2002 Nov;29(4):364-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Sharon Whiting
Peter Camfield
Samuel Wiebe
Maryse Lassonde
Hannelore Sauerwein
Lionel Carmant
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2002 Nov;29(4):364-71
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Epilepsy - economics - psychology
Humans
Abstract
The Canadian Pediatric Epilepsy Network is a network of scientists and health care professionals in partnership with organizations which provide education and support to children with epilepsy. The objective of the network is to gain a better understanding of childhood epilepsy through collaborative research conducted with doctors, psychologists, nurses, social workers, educators and scientists across Canada. The network was launched at a meeting in Ottawa in the spring of 2000 where several oral presentations addressed the issues of the fundamental questions of epilepsy, the economic impact and the neuropsychology of childhood epilepsy. The intent was to provoke discussion on future areas of research for the network.
PubMed ID
12463492 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Aug 10;116(18):2216-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1996
Author
T. Sund
S. Pedersen
J. Størmer
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Aug 10;116(18):2216-7
Date
Aug-10-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Humans
Norway
Teleradiology - economics
PubMed ID
8801675 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Effectiveness of health resort therapy of medical patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213180
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1996;74(5):64-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N G Krivobokov
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1996;74(5):64-5
Date
1996
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Resorts - economics
Humans
Internal Medicine
Russia
PubMed ID
8999194 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A study of IVF treatment: misleading polemics on cost effectiveness]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64943
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jul 22;89(30-31):2496
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-1992
Author
B. Jönsson
B. Brorsson
P. Carlsson
G. Karlsson
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jul 22;89(30-31):2496
Date
Jul-22-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Humans
Pregnancy
Sweden
PubMed ID
1507973 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indigenous cost-effective peritoneo-venous shunt for refractory ascites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179015
Source
Int Surg. 2004 Apr-Jun;89(2):85-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Marimuthu
A Suresh Kumar
S. Sabanathan
A. Gowrishankar
P Sasi Kumar
J S Rajkumar
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, RIGID Hospitals, Kilpauk, Chennai, India.
Source
Int Surg. 2004 Apr-Jun;89(2):85-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ascites - surgery
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Humans
Peritoneovenous Shunt - economics - methods
Abstract
About 5% of patients with chronic liver disease develop massive refractory ascites. These patients cease to respond to diuretic therapy and may develop prerenal azotemia. There is a small but definite role for the peritoneo-venous shunt in these patients. In our study of 36 patients, managed with locally made, single-valved peritoneo-venous shunts (GSAIMS shunts), shunt failure and complication rates were assessed postoperatively. There is a definite improvement in quality of life with this cost-effective locally made shunt if patients are selected carefully. Long-term follow-up of these patients is not possible because most of these patients succumb to advanced liver disease.
PubMed ID
15285240 View in PubMed
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2775 records – page 1 of 278.