Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1320 records – page 1 of 132.

6-month CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - a case study from the couple's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165224
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Anders Broström
Peter Johansson
Jan Albers
Jan Wiberg
Eva Svanborg
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. andbr@imv.liu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - adverse effects - psychology
Cost of Illness
Fear
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frustration
Humans
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Obesity, Morbid - complications
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Snoring - etiology - psychology
Social Behavior
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is independently associated with an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can reduce mortality and morbidity, but low compliance rates are seen.
To explore and describe the experiences of CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe OSAS during a 6-month period from the couple's perspective. METHODS AND THE CASE: A single case study with a phenomenographic approach was employed. Diagnostic procedures of OSAS and initiation of treatment with Auto-CPAP, humidifier and a nasal mask were performed during 4 visits. Conceptions were collected at 4 different occasions during the 6-month period (before, and 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment initiation) by means of interviews with a 33-year old male patient and his female partner.
Totally 17 different structural aspects were found to fluctuate during the 6-month period in relation to; influence of stressors, social reactions and adaptation to increase compliance.
An increased knowledge about the influence of stressors, the social reactions, and the adaptation can help healthcare personnel to identify and better understand concerns of other patients and spouses during different time phases of the initial 6-month period of CPAP-treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):89-9018396463
PubMed ID
17291832 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10 year asthma programme in Finland: major change for the better.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168103
Source
Thorax. 2006 Aug;61(8):663-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
T. Haahtela
L E Tuomisto
A. Pietinalho
T. Klaukka
M. Erhola
M. Kaila
M M Nieminen
E. Kontula
L A Laitinen
Author Affiliation
Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P O Box 160, FIN-00029 HUS, Finland. tari.haahtela@hus.fi
Source
Thorax. 2006 Aug;61(8):663-70
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Communication
Cost of Illness
Disabled Persons
Emergency Treatment - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Health Promotion - economics - organization & administration - trends
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Insurance, Disability - economics
Interprofessional Relations
National Health Programs - economics - trends
Pharmaceutical Services - standards
Primary Health Care
Program Evaluation
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
A National Asthma Programme was undertaken in Finland from 1994 to 2004 to improve asthma care and prevent an increase in costs. The main goal was to lessen the burden of asthma to individuals and society.
The action programme focused on implementation of new knowledge, especially for primary care. The main premise underpinning the campaign was that asthma is an inflammatory disease and requires anti-inflammatory treatment from the outset. The key for implementation was an effective network of asthma-responsible professionals and development of a post hoc evaluation strategy. In 1997 Finnish pharmacies were included in the Pharmacy Programme and in 2002 a Childhood Asthma mini-Programme was launched.
The incidence of asthma is still increasing, but the burden of asthma has decreased considerably. The number of hospital days has fallen by 54% from 110 000 in 1993 to 51 000 in 2003, 69% in relation to the number of asthmatics (n = 135 363 and 207 757, respectively), with the trend still downwards. In 1993, 7212 patients of working age (9% of 80 133 asthmatics) received a disability pension from the Social Insurance Institution compared with 1741 in 2003 (1.5% of 116 067 asthmatics). The absolute decrease was 76%, and 83% in relation to the number of asthmatics. The increase in the cost of asthma (compensation for disability, drugs, hospital care, and outpatient doctor visits) ended: in 1993 the costs were 218 million euro which had fallen to 213.5 million euro in 2003. Costs per patient per year have decreased 36% (from 1611 euro to 1031 euro).
It is possible to reduce the morbidity of asthma and its impact on individuals as well as on society. Improvements would have taken place without the programme, but not of this magnitude.
Notes
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1999 Aug;14(2):288-9410515403
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Mar 23;312(7033):762-68605467
Cites: Allergy. 2005 Mar;60(3):283-9215679712
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Apr 14;352(15):1519-2815829533
Cites: BMJ. 2005 May 21;330(7501):1186-715849204
Cites: Thorax. 2005 Jul;60(7):545-815994260
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2000 Feb;15(2):235-710706483
Cites: Respir Med. 2000 Apr;94(4):299-32710845429
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Nov 30;161(11 Suppl):S1-6110906907
Cites: Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2000 Nov;11(4):236-4011110578
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2000 Nov;16(5):802-711153575
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Aug 15;164(4):565-811520716
Cites: Thorax. 2001 Oct;56(10):806-1411562522
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2001 Nov;108(5 Suppl):S147-33411707753
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2002 Aug;20(2):397-40212212973
Cites: Thorax. 2003 Feb;58 Suppl 1:i1-9412653493
Cites: Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2003 Jun;7(6):592-812797704
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Jul;114(1):40-715241342
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(4):310-615370772
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1985 Apr;131(4):599-6063994155
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Aug 8;325(6):388-922062329
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 Sep 15;331(11):700-58058076
Cites: Qual Health Care. 1994 Mar;3(1):45-5210136260
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Mar 23;312(7033):748-528605463
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2004 Nov;24(5):734-915516665
PubMed ID
16877690 View in PubMed
Less detail

28-Joint count disease activity score at 3 months after diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis is strongly associated with direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years: the Swedish TIRA project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137343
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011 Jul;50(7):1259-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Eva Hallert
Magnus Husberg
Thomas Skogh
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. eva.hallert@liu.se
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011 Jul;50(7):1259-67
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - economics - therapy
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Health Expenditures
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To explore possible association between disease activity at 3-month follow-up after RA diagnosis and costs over the following 4 years.
Three-hundred and twenty patients with early (= 1 year) RA were assessed at regular intervals. Clinical and laboratory data were collected and patients reported health-care utilization and number of days lost from work. At 3-month follow-up, patients were divided into two groups according to disease activity, using DAS-28 with a cut-off level at 3.2. Direct and indirect costs and EuroQol-5D over the following 4 years were compared between the groups. Multivariate regression models were used to control for possible covariates.
Three months after diagnosis, a DAS-28 level of = 3.2 was associated with high direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years. Patients with DAS-28 = 3.2 at 3-month follow-up had more visits to physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and nurse, higher drug costs, more days in hospital and more extensive surgery compared with patients with 3-month DAS-28
PubMed ID
21292734 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to primary health care among homeless adults in Toronto, Canada: results from the Street Health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131318
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(2):e94-e103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Erika Khandor
Kate Mason
Catharine Chambers
Kate Rossiter
Laura Cowan
Stephen W Hwang
Author Affiliation
Toronto Public Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(2):e94-e103
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Communication Barriers
Cost of Illness
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Homeless Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Primary Health Care - economics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite experiencing a disproportionate burden of acute and chronic health issues, many homeless people face barriers to primary health care. Most studies on health care access among homeless populations have been conducted in the United States, and relatively few are available from countries such as Canada that have a system of universal health insurance. We investigated access to primary health care among a representative sample of homeless adults in Toronto, Canada.
Homeless adults were recruited from shelter and meal programs in downtown Toronto between November 2006 and February 2007. Cross-sectional data were collected on demographic characteristics, health status, health determinants and access to health care. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to investigate the association between having a family doctor as the usual source of health care (an indicator of access to primary care) and health status, proof of health insurance, and substance use after adjustment for demographic characteristics.
Of the 366 participants included in our study, 156 (43%) reported having a family doctor. After adjustment for potential confounders and covariates, we found that the odds of having a family doctor significantly decreased with every additional year spent homeless in the participant's lifetime (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.86-0.97). Having a family doctor was significantly associated with being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgendered (adjusted OR 2.70, 95% CI 1.04-7.00), having a health card (proof of health insurance coverage in the province of Ontario) (adjusted OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.61-4.89) and having a chronic medical condition (adjusted OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.03-3.53).
Less than half of the homeless people in Toronto who participated in our study reported having a family doctor. Not having a family doctor was associated with key indicators of health care access and health status, including increasing duration of homelessness, lack of proof of health insurance coverage and having a chronic medical condition. Increased efforts are needed to address the barriers to appropriate health care and good health that persist in this population despite the provision of health insurance.
Notes
Cites: Arch Fam Med. 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1043-5111115206
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Apr 26;283(16):2152-710791509
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jan 10;285(2):200-611176814
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Jan 23;164(2):229-3311332321
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2001 May-Jun;36(6-7):807-2411697612
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 May;92(5):778-8411988447
Cites: Med Care. 2002 Jun;40(6):510-2012021677
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2002 Nov;53(11):1472-412407279
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2003 Nov;18(11):921-814687278
Cites: CMAJ. 2004 Apr 13;170(8):1243-715078846
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Aug 4;292(5):569-7415292082
Cites: Can Nurse. 1993 Jan;89(1):21-48425165
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1996 May;11(5):269-768725975
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 1997 Mar;48(3):387-909057243
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1997 Feb;87(2):217-209103100
Cites: Addiction. 1997 Apr;92(4):437-459177065
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1998 Jun;13(6):389-979669568
Cites: Arch Fam Med. 1998 Jul-Aug;7(4):352-79682689
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 1999 Mar-Apr;34(4-5):727-4610210102
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2005 Mar-Apr;3(2):159-6615798043
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S23-916078553
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2006 Jan;21(1):71-716423128
Cites: Am Fam Physician. 2006 Jul 15;74(2):279-8616883925
Cites: Fam Pract. 2006 Dec;23(6):631-616799166
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2007 Jul;22(7):1011-717415619
Cites: Healthc Q. 2008;11(3):70-618536538
Cites: BMJ. 2009;339:b403619858533
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Aug;100(8):1454-6120558789
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Jul 25;163(2):170-110934979
Cites: Med Care. 1999 Dec;37(12):1282-9310599609
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2000 Feb;34(6):1273-30210654830
Cites: Arch Fam Med. 2000 Apr;9(4):333-810776361
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2000 Oct;35(10):444-5011127718
PubMed ID
21915240 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Health Rep. 1995;7(2):7-16(Eng); 7-17(Fre)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
W J Millar
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division at Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
Source
Health Rep. 1995;7(2):7-16(Eng); 7-17(Fre)
Date
1995
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Accidents - economics - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Using data from Statistics Canada's 1988 and 1993 General Social Survey (GSS), this article examines the incidence and consequences of accidents in Canada and the characteristics of respondents aged 15 and over who were involved in them. In 1993, an estimated 3.9 million Canadians reported that they had been involved in 4.8 million accidents in the previous 12 months. Motor vehicle accidents and sports accidents were the most frequent, each accounting for about 27% of incidents, followed by accidents at work (21%) and at home (14%). Accidents were most common among young people, particularly men. However, from 1988 to 1993, there was a decline in the proportion of adults reporting accidents, and the sharpest drop was for the age group most at risk-15- to 24-year-olds. Most of the downturn was attributable to a decrease in the motor vehicle accident rate. Since alcohol is known to be associated with accidents, reduced consumption during the same period may have been partly responsible for the decline in accident rates. Other factors that may have contributed include stricter enforcement of impaired driving legislation and speed limits, and improvements in automobile safety. Nonetheless, despite the decline in accident rates, the toll taken by accidents reported in 1993 was considerable: 80% of accidents caused personal injury, and almost half of these resulted in medical attention in a hospital. Overall, 62% of accidents resulted in activity-loss days, and 29% involved bed-disability days. Hospital utilization costs associated with these accidents in 1993 were about $1.5 billion. As well, about one-third of accidents involved out-of-pocket expenses, totalling $791 million. Moreover, accidents continue to be the leading cause of death among persons under age 44.
PubMed ID
9395441 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acculturation and celiac disease risk in second-generation immigrants: a nationwide cohort study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122335
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct;47(10):1174-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Carl Johan Wingren
Daniel Agardh
Juan Merlo
Author Affiliation
Unit for Social Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. carl_johan.wingren@med.lu.se
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct;47(10):1174-80
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Celiac Disease - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Effect
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Environmental health
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The burden of celiac disease (CD) is increasingly recognized as a global problem. However, whether this situation depends on genetics or environmental factors is uncertain. The authors examined these aspects in Sweden, a country in which the risk of CD is generally considered to be high. If environmental factors are relevant, CD risk in second-generation immigrant children should be related to maternal length of stay in Sweden before delivery.
Linking the Swedish Medical Birth Registry to other national registries, the authors investigated all singleton children (n = 792,401) born in Sweden between 1987 and 1993. They studied the risk of CD in children before age 6 as a function of the mother's geographical region of birth and length of stay in Sweden before delivery using Cox regression models.
In children whose mothers immigrated to Sweden from a country outside of Europe, a maternal length of stay in Sweden of more than 5 years increased the hazard ratio (HR) of CD (1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-2.81). The authors observed a similar result among children born to mothers from a Nordic country outside of Sweden (HR 1.57, 95% CI 0.89-2.75), but a non-conclusive protective effect was observed in second-generation immigrant children from a non-Nordic European country (HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.39-1.09).
The risk of CD among second-generation immigrants seems to be conditioned by maternal length of stay in Sweden before delivery, suggesting that environmental factors contribute to the variation in CD risk observed across populations.
PubMed ID
22827636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of leg ulcers reduce prevalence, care time and costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81702
Source
J Wound Care. 2006 Jun;15(6):259-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Oien R F
Ragnarson Tennvall G.
Author Affiliation
Blekinge Wound Healing Centre, Lyckeby, Sweden. rut.oien@ltblekinge.se
Source
J Wound Care. 2006 Jun;15(6):259-62
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bandages
Community Health Nursing - economics - education
Cost Control
Cost of Illness
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Female
Humans
Leg Ulcer - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology - nursing
Male
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Staff - economics - education - psychology
Population Surveillance
Practice Guidelines
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Skin Care - economics - nursing
Sweden - epidemiology
Time and Motion Studies
Workload - economics
Wound Healing
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This long-term follow-up recorded the prevalence, aetiology and treatment of hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcers, and an estimated nurses' time spent providing care, for the years 1994-2005. METHOD: A questionnaire was sent to all district and community nurses in the county of Blekinge, Sweden, during one week in 1994, 1998, 2004 and 2005. Calculating the costs of hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcer care was not a primary aim, but the reduction in prevalence and time spent on wound management suggested it was important to illustrate the economic consequences of these changes over time. RESULTS: Estimated prevalence of hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcers reduced from 0.22% in 1994 to 0.15% in 2005. Treatment time decreased from 1.7 hours per patient per week in 1994 to 1.3 hours in 2005. Annual costs of leg and foot ulcer care reduced by SEK 6.96 million in the study area from 1994 to 2005. CONCLUSION: Improved wound management was demonstrated; leg and foot ulcer prevalence and treatment time were reduced. The results could be attributed to an increased interest in leg and foot ulcer care among staff, which was maintained by repeated questionnaires, continuous education, establishment of a wound healing centre in primary care and wound management recommendations from a multidisciplinary group. The improved ulcer care reduced considerably the annual costs of wound management in the area.
PubMed ID
16802562 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active consideration: conceptualizing patient-provided support for spouse caregivers in the context of prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190673
Source
Qual Health Res. 2002 Apr;12(4):492-514
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Karen D Fergus
Ross E Gray
Margaret I Fitch
Manon Labrecque
Catherine Phillips
Author Affiliation
York University.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2002 Apr;12(4):492-514
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Female
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Ontario
Prostatectomy - nursing
Prostatic Neoplasms - nursing - psychology - surgery
Social Support
Abstract
In this study, the authors examine the under-investigated topic of patient-provided support for spouse caregivers. Thirty-four men with prostate cancer and their female partners were interviewed separately three times: before the man's radical prostatectomy, 8 to 10 weeks postsurgery, and 1 year postsurgery. The core category of active consideration encompassed 4 dimensions: easing spousal burden, keeping us up, maintaining connection, and considering spouse. Patient-provided support entails two overlapping tasks: minimizing the practical and emotional impact of the illness and tending to the caregiver's social-emotional needs. A theory expounding on the double bind of being both a patient and an agent in light of masculine socialization practices is articulated and brought to bear on the phenomenon of patient-provided support.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Nurs. 2003 Jan;6(1):3112546049
PubMed ID
11939250 View in PubMed
Less detail

Actual vs best practice for families post-stroke according to three rehabilitation disciplines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161684
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Sep;39(7):513-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Annie Rochette
Nicol Korner-Bitensky
Johanne Desrosiers
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Quebec, Canada. annie.rochette@umontreal.ca
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Sep;39(7):513-9
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Community Health Services
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physical Therapy Modalities
Questionnaires
Speech Therapy
Spouses - psychology
Stroke - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
To investigate occupational therapists', physiotherapists' and speech language pathologists' family-related rehabilitation practice post-stroke and its association with clinician and environmental variables.
A Canadian cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted on 1755 clinicians. Three case studies describing typical patients after stroke receiving acute care, in-patient rehabilitation, or community rehabilitation, and including specific descriptors regarding family stress and concern, were used to elicit information on patient management.
One-third of the sample identified a family-related problem and offered a related intervention, but only 12/1755 clinicians indicated that they would typically use a standardized assessment of family functioning. Working in the community out-patient setting was associated (OR 9.16), whereas working in a rehabilitation in-patient setting was negatively associated (OR 0.58) with being a problem identifier, the reference group being acute care. Being a PT (OR 0.53) or an SLP (OR 0.49) vs an OT was negatively associated with being a problem identifier, whereas being older (OR 1.02 ) or working in Ontario (OR 1.58) was associated with being a problem identifier. To work in a community out-patient setting (OR 2.43), being older clinicians (OR 1.02) or not perceiving their work environment being supportive of an on-going professional learning (OR 1.72) was associated with being an intervention user,whereas being a PT (OR 0.50) was negatively associated with being a user.
For these 3 disciplines, the prevalence of a family-related focus is low post-stroke. Given the increasing evidence regarding the effectiveness of family-related interventions on stroke outcomes, it is imperative that best practice is implemented.
PubMed ID
17724549 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute pancreatitis--costs for healthcare and loss of production.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106661
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Dec;48(12):1459-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Bodil Andersson
Björn Appelgren
Viktor Sjödin
Daniel Ansari
Johan Nilsson
Ulf Persson
Bobby Tingstedt
Roland Andersson
Author Affiliation
Departments of Surgery, Clinical science in Lund, Lund University and Skåne University hospital , Lund , Sweden.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Dec;48(12):1459-65
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cost of Illness
Efficiency
Female
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Pancreatitis - economics - therapy
Regression Analysis
Severity of Illness Index
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. Severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) can vary from a mild to a fulminant disease with high morbidity and mortality. Cost analysis has, however, hitherto been sparse. The aim of this study was to calculate the cost of acute pancreatitis, both including hospital costs and costs due to loss of production. MATERIAL AND METHODS. All adult patients treated at Skane University Hospital, Lund, during 2009-2010, were included. A severity grading was conducted and cost analysis was performed on an individual basis. RESULTS. Two hundred and fifty-two patients with altogether 307 admissions were identified. Mean age was 60 ± 19 years, and 121 patients (48%) were men. Severe AP (SAP) was diagnosed in 38 patients (12%). Thirteen patients (5%) died. Acute biliary pancreatitis was more costly than alcohol induced AP (p
PubMed ID
24131379 View in PubMed
Less detail

1320 records – page 1 of 132.