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[About Minimization of Expenses on Allergy Diagnosis in Children: Analysis of Consistency of in Vitro- and in Vivo-Allergic Examinations Results].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272621
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2015;(6):748-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
M A Snovskaya
A S Batyrova
L S Namazova-Baranova
A A Alekseeva
E A Vishneva
O V Kozhevnikova
A A Marushina
V N Lubov
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2015;(6):748-55
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Allergens - classification - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost Savings - methods
Dermatitis, Atopic - blood - diagnosis - economics - etiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis - blood
Immunologic Techniques - economics - methods
Male
Needs Assessment
Pollen - classification - immunology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - blood - diagnosis - economics - etiology
Russia
Abstract
High morbidity rate of atopic diseases among children, including high importance of grass pollen as a sensitizing agent, determine the relevance ofstudies on diagnostic examination systems for appointment of adequate therapy. The research of the most relevant allergens for patients to excludeof duplicating and uninformative tests became urgent after development of a new type of diagnostic tests that does not require expensive equipment. The objective of this research was to evaluate the results of in vitro- and in vivo-diagnostic examinations of children with various forms of atopic disease caused by pollen of meadow grasses, and to choose the most significant prognostic parameters for the diagnosis.
277 children aged 4-16 years with various forms of atopic disease were included in the study. There were performed skin prick tests and determination of IgE-antibodies levels to allergen extracts of cocksfoot (g3), meadow fescue (g4), timothy grass (g6).
In the studied group of patients 32-50% of children have antibodies to grass allergens. There was a close correlation of antibody response on the investigated allergens, quantitative coincidence of IgE-antibodies to g3 andg4 allergens levels. IgE (g6) concentration was close to the IgE(g3) and IgE(g4) levels (85.0 ± 21.6%). Analysis of the skin tests results showed that 44% of patients have a positive response to grass allergens, and in vivo-tests results coincide with serologicaltests results, mostly in a qualitative sense. The most significant relationship was noted between in vivo and in vitro-tests in the results of testing the response to meadow fescue pollen.
Based on these data IgE concentration index to meadow fescue allergens can be used as a prognostic marker to determine the sensitization of patients with different nosology forms of allergy and can help to improve allergic diagnostics.
PubMed ID
27093804 View in PubMed
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Abridged version of the Society of Rural Physicians of Canada's discussion paper on rural hospital service closures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149706
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2009;14(3):111-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Peter Hutten-Czapski
Author Affiliation
Society of Rural Physicians of Canada, Shawville, Que. phc@srpc.ca
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2009;14(3):111-4
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost Savings
Health Facility Closure
Hospitals, Rural - economics - supply & distribution
Humans
Quality of Health Care
Regional Health Planning
Rural Health Services
Rural Population
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
19594995 View in PubMed
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[Activities performed by general practitioners before and after the introduction of an inter-municipal emergency service and the list patient system].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181382
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 19;124(4):506-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-2004
Author
Ola Jøsendal
Solfrid Aase
Author Affiliation
Radøy legesenter, 5936 Manger. ola.josendal@psyhp.uib.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 19;124(4):506-7
Date
Feb-19-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
After-Hours Care - economics - organization & administration - utilization
Cost Savings
Efficiency, Organizational
Emergency Medical Services - economics - organization & administration - utilization
Family Practice - economics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Reform - economics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
House Calls - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Norway
Referral and Consultation - economics - organization & administration - utilization
Registries
Abstract
Over a span of four years we studied the number and type of patient contacts with the off-hour emergency service in a municipality in Western Norway. At the start of the period, the service was organised by each municipality, later more municipalities formed a regional service. At the end of the period, a list patient system was introduced.
All contacts from patients as well as activities performed by general practitioners on off-hour emergency duty were registered in four separate periods, from 1999 to 2002.
Simultaneously with shift from a local to a regional system, the proportion of home calls fell from 18% to less than 1%. The implementation of a list patient system combined with a regional system reduced the total number of contacts by 30%. Public expenditure was reduced by 66%.
The combination of a regional off-hour service and a list patient system gives an efficient organisation. The total work-load for doctors is significantly reduced and the quality of medical services improve; financial considerations also support a shift in off-hour emergency service towards regional organisation.
PubMed ID
14983200 View in PubMed
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Activity-based costing in radiology. Application in a pediatric radiological unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32870
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Mar;41(2):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J. Laurila
I. Suramo
M. Brommels
E M Tolppanen
P. Koivukangas
P. Lanning
G. Standertskjöld-Nordenstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Mar;41(2):189-95
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cost Savings
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Care Rationing - economics
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pediatrics - economics
Radiology Department, Hospital - economics
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
PURPOSE: To get an informative and detailed picture of the resource utilization in a radiology department in order to support its pricing and management. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A system based mainly on the theoretical foundations of activity-based costing (ABC) was designed, tested and compared with conventional costing. The study was performed at the Pediatric Unit of the Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital. The material consisted of all the 7,452 radiological procedures done in the unit during the first half of 1994, when both methods of costing where in use. Detailed cost data were obtained from the hospital financial and personnel systems and then related to activity data captured in the radiology information system. RESULTS: The allocation of overhead costs was greatly reduced by the introduction of ABC compared to conventional costing. The overhead cost as a percentage of total costs dropped to one-fourth of total costs, from 57% to 16%. The change of unit costs of radiological procedures varied from -42% to +82%. CONCLUSION: Costing is much more detailed and precise, and the percentage of unspecified allocated overhead costs diminishes drastically when ABC is used. The new information enhances effective departmental management, as the whole process of radiological procedures is identifiable by single activities, amenable to corrective actions and process improvement.
PubMed ID
10741796 View in PubMed
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Adding formoterol to budesonide in moderate asthma--health economic results from the FACET study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10200
Source
Respir Med. 2001 Jun;95(6):505-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
F. Andersson
E. Stahl
P J Barnes
C G Löfdahl
P M O'Byrne
R A Pauwels
D S Postma
A E Tattersfield
A. Ullman
Author Affiliation
AstraZeneca R&D Lund, Sweden. fredrik.l.andersson@astrazeneca.com
Source
Respir Med. 2001 Jun;95(6):505-12
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - economics
Budesonide - economics - therapeutic use
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Drug Therapy, Combination
Ethanolamines - economics - therapeutic use
Great Britain
Health Care Costs
Humans
Middle Aged
Normal Distribution
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spain
Sweden
Abstract
The FACET (Formoterol and Corticosteroid Establishing Therapy) study established that there is a clear clinical benefit in adding formoterol to budesonide therapy in patients who have persistent symptoms of asthma despite treatment with low to moderate doses of an inhaled corticosteroid. We combined the clinical results from the FACET study with an expert survey on average resource use in connection with mild and severe asthma exacerbations in the U.K., Sweden and Spain. The primary objective of this study was to assess the health economics of adding the inhaled long-acting beta2-agonist formoterol to the inhaled corticosteroid budesonide in the treatment of asthma. The extra costs of adding the inhaled beta2-agonist formoterol to the corticosteroid budesonide in asthmatic patients in Sweden were offset by savings from reduced use of resources for exacerbations. For Spain the picture was mixed. Adding formoterol to low dose budesonide generated savings, whereas for moderate doses of budesonide about 75% of the extra formoterol costs could be recouped. In the U.K., other savings offset about half of the extra cost of formoterol. All cost-effectiveness ratios are within accepted cost-effectiveness ranges reported from previous studies. If productivity losses were included, there were net savings in all three countries, ranging from Euro 267-1183 per patient per year. In conclusion, adding the inhaled, long-acting beta2-agonist formoterol to low-moderate doses of the inhaled corticosteroid budesonide generated significant gains in all outcome measures with partial or complete offset of costs. Adding formoterol to budesonide can thus be considered to be cost-effective.
PubMed ID
11421509 View in PubMed
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The addition of S100B to guidelines for management of mild head injury is potentially cost saving.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278895
Source
BMC Neurol. 2016 Oct 20;16(1):200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2016
Author
Olga Calcagnile
Anders Anell
Johan Undén
Source
BMC Neurol. 2016 Oct 20;16(1):200
Date
Oct-20-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Brain Concussion - blood - diagnostic imaging - economics
Cost Savings
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
S100 Calcium Binding Protein beta Subunit - blood
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with substantial costs due to over-triage of patients to computed tomography (CT) scanning, despite validated decision rules. Serum biomarker S100B has shown promise for safely omitting CT scans but the economic impact from clinical use has never been reported. In 2007, S100B was adapted into the existing Scandinavian management guidelines in Halmstad, Sweden, in an attempt to reduce CT scans and save costs.
Consecutive adult patients with mild TBI (GCS 14-15, loss of consciousness and/or amnesia), managed with the aid of S100B, were prospectively included in this study. Patients were followed up after 3 months with a standardized questionnaire. Theoretical and actual cost differences were calculated.
Seven hundred twenty-six patients were included and 29 (4.7 %) showed traumatic abnormalities on CT. No further significant intracranial complications were discovered on follow-up. Two hundred twenty-nine patients (27 %) had normal S100B levels and 497 patients (73 %) showed elevated S100B levels. Over-triage occurred in 73 patients (32 %) and under-triage occurred in 39 patients (7 %). No significant intracranial complications were missed. The introduction of S100B could save 71 € per patient if guidelines were strictly followed. As compliance to the guidelines was not perfect, the actual cost saving was 39 € per patient.
Adding S100B to existing guidelines for mild TBI seems to reduce CT usage and costs, especially if guideline compliance could be increased.
PubMed ID
27765016 View in PubMed
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[Admission to the obstetric department versus ambulatory labor--seen from women's perspective]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64117
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Feb 22;161(8):1134-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-1999
Author
J L Knudsen
M. Christensen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Feb 22;161(8):1134-5
Date
Feb-22-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - economics
Comparative Study
Cost Savings
Denmark
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric
Length of Stay
Maternal Welfare
Patient Admission
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Oct 5;160(41):5939-429786034
PubMed ID
10074860 View in PubMed
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Advancing health system integration through supply chain improvement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170152
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):62-6, 4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Mike Rosser
Author Affiliation
Healthcare Materials Management Services, London, Ontario. mike.rosser@sjhc.london.on.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):62-6, 4
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Cost Savings
Hospital Distribution Systems
Hospital Information Systems
Hospital Shared Services - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Inventories, Hospital
Leadership
Materials Management, Hospital - organization & administration
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Purchasing, Hospital
Safety Management
Abstract
Collaboration is a key element to success in the provision of sustainable and integrated healthcare services. Among the many initiatives undertaken to improve service quality and reduce costs, collaboration among hospitals in Ontario has been difficult to achieve; however, voluntary collaboration is vital to achieving transformation of the magnitude envisioned by system leaders.
PubMed ID
16548436 View in PubMed
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[A five-day ward for the hospitalized elderly. Dynamics, diagnosis and economics]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73132
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Oct 20;114(25):2965-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1994
Author
G. Asbjørnsen
Author Affiliation
Geriatrisk avdeling, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Oct 20;114(25):2965-7
Date
Oct-20-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cost Savings
English Abstract
Female
Health Services for the Aged - economics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Units - economics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Norway
Abstract
A geriatric five-day unit of 15 beds was studied continuously for 12 months. There were 330 admissions, mainly referrals from general practitioners via the outpatient clinic. Multiple pathology and loss of function were common. The opinion of colleagues within other specialties was sought on 133 occasions. 39% of the patients received physiotherapy, 27% received occupational therapy and 13% the services of a social worker. Compared with the cost of running a conventional ward of the same size, the financial savings are estimated to be fully NOK 750,000.
PubMed ID
7974409 View in PubMed
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Source
Harv Bus Rev. 2003 Feb;81(2):80-7, 125
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Sydney Rosen
Jonathon Simon
Jeffrey R Vincent
William MacLeod
Matthew Fox
Donald M Thea
Author Affiliation
Boston University School of Public Health's Center for International Health, USA.
Source
Harv Bus Rev. 2003 Feb;81(2):80-7, 125
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Adult
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - economics
Botswana - epidemiology
Commerce - economics
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Developing Countries - economics
Employer Health Costs
Employment
HIV Infections - drug therapy - economics - epidemiology
Humans
Internationality
Investments - economics
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - economics
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
South Africa - epidemiology
Abstract
If your company operates in a developing country, AIDS is your business. While Africa has received the most attention, AIDS is also spreading swiftly in other parts of the world. Russia and Ukraine had the fastest-growing epidemics last year, and many experts believe China and India will suffer the next tidal wave of infection. Why should executives be concerned about AIDS? Because it is destroying the twin rationales of globalization strategy-cheap labor and fast-growing markets--in countries where people are heavily affected by the epidemic. Fortunately, investments in programs that prevent infection and provide treatment for employees who have HIV/AIDS are profitable for many businesses--that is, they lead to savings that outweigh the programs' costs. Due to the long latency period between HIV infection and the onset of AIDS symptoms, a company is not likely to see any of the costs of HIV/AIDS until five to ten years after an employee is infected. But executives can calculate the present value of epidemic-related costs by using the discount rate to weigh each cost according to its expected timing. That allows companies to think about expenses on HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment programs as investments rather than merely as costs. The authors found that the annual cost of AIDS to six corporations in South Africa and Botswana ranged from 0.4% to 5.9% of the wage bill. All six companies would have earned positive returns on their investments if they had provided employees with free treatment for HIV/AIDS in the form of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), according to the mathematical model the authors used. The annual reduction in the AIDS "tax" would have been as much as 40.4%. The authors' conclusion? Fighting AIDS not only helps those infected; it also makes good business sense.
PubMed ID
12577655 View in PubMed
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372 records – page 1 of 38.