Skip header and navigation

Refine By

21 records – page 1 of 3.

[A certain increase of skin cancer among pilots].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184428
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Niklas Hammar
Harald Eliasch
Anette Linnersjö
Bo-Göran Dammström
Maritha Johansson
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Enheten för epidemiologi, Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. niklas.hammar@imm.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - manpower
Aircraft
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2278-912872371
PubMed ID
12872376 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breast cancer risk among Finnish cabin attendants: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174282
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Jul;62(7):488-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
K. Kojo
E. Pukkala
A. Auvinen
Author Affiliation
STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki, Finland. katja.kojo@uta.fi
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Jul;62(7):488-93
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aircraft
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Logistic Models
Menstruation Disturbances - complications
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sleep Disorders - complications
Time Factors
Travel
Abstract
Earlier studies have found increased breast cancer risk among female cabin crew. This has been suggested to reflect lifestyle factors (for example, age at first birth), other confounding factors (for example, age at menarche), or occupational factors such as exposure to cosmic radiation and circadian rhythm alterations due to repeated jet lag.
To assess the contribution of occupational versus lifestyle and other factors to breast cancer risk among cabin attendants in Finland.
A standardised self-administered questionnaire on demographic, occupational, and lifestyle factors was given to 1041 cabin attendants. A total of 27 breast cancer cases and 517 non-cases completed the questionnaire. Breast cancer diagnoses were confirmed through the Finnish Cancer Registry. Exposure to cosmic radiation was estimated based on self-reported flight history and timetables. A conditional logistic regression model was used for analysis.
In the univariate analysis, family history of breast cancer (OR = 2.67, 95% CI: 1.00 to 7.08) was the strongest determinant of breast cancer. Of occupational exposures, sleep rhythm disruptions (OR = 1.72, 95% CI: 0.70 to 4.27) were positively related and disruption of menstrual cycles (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.26 to 1.96) negatively related to breast cancer. However, both associations were statistically non-significant. Cumulative radiation dose (OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.19) showed no effect on breast cancer.
Results suggest that breast cancer risk among Finnish cabin attendants is related to well established risk factors of breast cancer, such as family history of breast cancer. There was no clear evidence that the three occupational factors studied affected breast cancer risk among Finnish flight attendants.
Notes
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2003 Nov;60(11):807-914573709
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2003 Jun;17(2):273-8512787552
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2002 May;13(4):317-2412074501
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2002 Jun 19;94(12):943-812072548
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2001 Feb 2;84(3):397-911161406
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2000 Jun;36(9):1143-810854948
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2000 Feb 16;92(4):302-1210675379
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2004 Jan 26;90(2):299-30314735167
Cites: Radiat Environ Biophys. 1998 Jul;37(2):75-809728738
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Feb;12(2):95-10111246849
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Jan 27;312(7025):2538563615
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Sep 9;311(7006):649-527549630
Cites: Acta Oncol. 1994;33(4):365-98018367
Cites: Ergonomics. 1993 Jun;36(6):613-258513771
Cites: Radiat Res. 1991 Feb;125(2):214-221996380
Cites: Aviat Space Environ Med. 2004 Sep;75(9):806-1015460634
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004 Apr;30(2):157-6315127784
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1999 Jul;80(9):1459-6010424751
Cites: Breast. 2003 Dec;12(6):412-614659114
Cites: Radiat Res. 2003 Dec;160(6):707-1714640793
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Jun 20;316(7148):19029632420
Cites: Maturitas. 2002 Apr 15;41 Suppl 1:S85-10411955797
Cites: Health Phys. 2002 Apr;82(4):455-6611906134
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Aug;30(4):825-3011511611
Comment In: Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jan;63(1):71; author reply 7116366008
PubMed ID
15961626 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer incidence among Norwegian airline cabin attendants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19604
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Aug;30(4):825-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
T. Haldorsen
J B Reitan
U. Tveten
Author Affiliation
The Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. tor.haldorsen@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Aug;30(4):825-30
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aircraft
Aviation - statistics & numerical data
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Population Surveillance
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cabin crews are exposed to cosmic radiation at work and this may increase their incidence of radiation-induced cancers. Former studies indicate an increased risk of breast cancer. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was performed. The cohort was established from the files of the Civil Aviation Administration and included people with a valid licence as a cabin attendant between 1950 and 1994. The cohort was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. Observed number of cases was compared with expected, based on national rates. Breast cancer incidence was analysed, adjusting for individual fertility variables. RESULTS: A group of 3693 cabin attendants were followed over 72 804 person-years. Among the women, 38 cases of breast cancer were observed (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.1, 95% CI : 0.8-1.5). Among men excess risks were found for cancers in the upper respiratory and gastric tract (SIR = 6.0, 95% CI : 2.7-11.4) and cancer of the liver (two cases, SIR = 10.8, 95% CI : 1.3-39.2). For both sexes elevated risks were found for malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer; for men these were SIR = 2.9 (95% CI : 1.1-6.4) and SIR = 9.9 (95% CI : 4.5-18.8) respectively, while for women these were SIR = 1.7 (95% CI : 1.0-2.7) and SIR = 2.9 (95% CI : 1.0-6.9) respectively. For no cancer site was a significant decreased risk found. CONCLUSIONS: An increased risk of radiation-induced cancers was not observed. The excess risks of some other cancers are more probably explained by factors related to lifestyle.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Aug;30(4):830-211511612
PubMed ID
11511611 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer incidence in California flight attendants (United States).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19080
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 May;13(4):317-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Peggy Reynolds
James Cone
Michael Layefsky
Debbie E Goldberg
Susan Hurley
Author Affiliation
California Department of Health Services, Environmental Health Investigations Branch, Oakland 94612, USA.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 May;13(4):317-24
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Aircraft
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
California - epidemiology
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Social Class
Workplace
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine unusual exposure opportunities to flight crews from chemicals, cosmic radiation, and electric and magnetic fields. METHODS: This project evaluated the incidence of cancers of the breast and other sites among Association of Flight Attendants (AFA) members residing in California. AFA membership files were matched to California's statewide cancer registry to identify a total of 129 newly diagnosed invasive cancers among AFA members with California residential histories between 1988 and 1995. RESULTS: Compared to the general population, female breast cancer incidence was over 30% higher than expected, and malignant melanoma incidence was roughly twice that expected. Both of these are cancers that are associated with higher socioeconomic status and have been suggestively associated with various sources of radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the results from Nordic studies of cabin crews and a recent meta-analysis of prior studies, these data suggest that follow-up investigations should focus on the potential relative contribution of workplace exposures and lifestyle characteristics to the higher rates of disease for these two cancers.
PubMed ID
12074501 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Combined effects of low doses of ionizing radiation and extreme factors of the Far North on the immune system (review of the literature)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224460
Source
Gig Sanit. 1992 Feb;(2):52-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992

Cosmic radiation increases the risk of nuclear cataract in airline pilots: a population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50556
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 2005 Aug;123(8):1102-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Vilhjalmur Rafnsson
Eydis Olafsdottir
Jon Hrafnkelsson
Hiroshi Sasaki
Arsaell Arnarsson
Fridbert Jonasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Iceland, Neshagi 16, 107 Reykjavik, Iceland. vilraf@hi.is
Source
Arch Ophthalmol. 2005 Aug;123(8):1102-5
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aircraft
Case-Control Studies
Cataract - epidemiology - etiology
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Lens Nucleus, Crystalline - radiation effects
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Radiation, Ionizing
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Aviation involves exposure to ionizing radiation of cosmic origin. The association between lesions of the ocular lens and ionizing radiation is well-known. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether employment as a commercial airline pilot and the resulting exposure to cosmic radiation is associated with lens opacification. METHODS: This is a population-based case-control study of 445 men. Lens opacification was classified into 4 types using the World Health Organization simplified grading system. These 4 types, serving as cases, included 71 persons with nuclear cataracts, 102 with cortical lens opacification, 69 with central optical zone involvement, and 32 with posterior subcapsular lens opacification. Control subjects are those with a different type of lens opacification or without lens opacification. Exposure was assessed based on employment time as pilots, annual number of hours flown on each aircraft type, time tables, flight profiles, and individual cumulative radiation doses (in millisieverts) calculated by a software program. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: The odds ratio for nuclear cataract risk among cases and controls was 3.02 (95% confidence interval, 1.44-6.35) for pilots compared with nonpilots, adjusted for age, smoking status, and sunbathing habits. The odds ratio for nuclear cataract associated with estimation of cumulative radiation dose (in millisieverts) to the age of 40 years was 1.06 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.10), adjusted for age, smoking status, and sunbathing habits. CONCLUSION: The association between the cosmic radiation exposure of pilots and the risk of nuclear cataracts, adjusted for age, smoking status, and sunbathing habits, indicates that cosmic radiation may be a causative factor in nuclear cataracts among commercial airline pilots.
PubMed ID
16087845 View in PubMed
Less detail

Detection of DNA damage induced by space radiation in Mir and space shuttle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185037
Source
J Radiat Res. 2002 Dec;43 Suppl:S133-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Takeo Ohnishi
Ken Ohnishi
Akihisa Takahashi
Yoshitaka Taniguchi
Masaru Sato
Tamotsu Nakano
Shunji Nagaoka
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara, 634-8521, Japan. tohnishi@naramed-u.ac.jp
Source
J Radiat Res. 2002 Dec;43 Suppl:S133-6
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
DNA - radiation effects
DNA Damage
Hela Cells
Humans
Russia
Space Flight
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
Although physical monitoring of space radiation has been accomplished, we aim to measure exact DNA damage as caused by space radiation. If DNA damage is caused by space radiation, we can detect DNA damage dependent on the length of the space flight periods by using post-labeling methods. To detect DNA damage caused by space radiation, we placed fixed human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells in the Russian Mir space station for 40 days and in an American space shuttle for 9 days. After landing, we labeled space-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by enzymatic incorporation of [3H]-dATP with terminal deoxyribo-nucleotidyl transferase (TdT). We detected DNA damage as many grains on fixed silver emulsion resulting from beta-rays emitted from 3H-atoms in the nuclei of the cells placed in the Mir-station (J/Mir mission, STS-89), but detected hardly any in the ground control sample. In the space shuttle samples (S/MM-8), the number of cells having many grains was lower than that in the J/Mir mission samples. These results suggest that DNA damage is caused by space radiation and that it is dependent on the length of the space flight.
PubMed ID
12793746 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Effect of "unfavorable" days on the development of myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55400
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1989 Aug;67(8):135-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989

Incidence of cancer among commercial airline pilots.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20455
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2000 Mar;57(3):175-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
V. Rafnsson
J. Hrafnkelsson
H. Tulinius
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. vilraf@hi.is
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2000 Mar;57(3):175-9
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - methods - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe the cancer pattern in a cohort of commercial pilots by follow up through the Icelandic Cancer Registry. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study of 458 pilots with emphasis on subcohort working for an airline operating on international routes. A computerised file of the cohort was record linked to the Cancer Registry by making use of personal identification numbers. Expected numbers of cancer cases were calculated on the basis of number of person-years and incidences of cancer at specific sites for men provided by the Cancer Registry. Numbers of separate analyses were made according to different exposure variables. RESULTS: The standardised incidence ratio (SIR) for all cancers was 0.97 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.62 to 1.46) in the total cohort and 1.16 (95% CI 0.70 to 1.81) among those operating on international routes. The SIR for malignant melanoma of the skin was 10.20, 95% CI 3.29 to 23.81 in the total cohort and 15.63, 95% CI 5.04 to 36.46 in the restricted cohort. Analyses according to number of block-hours and radiation dose showed that malignant melanomas were found in the subgroups with highest exposure estimates, the SIRs were 13.04 and 28.57 respectively. The SIR was 25.00 for malignant melanoma among those who had been flying over five time zones. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows a high occurrence of malignant melanoma among pilots. It is open to discussion what role exposure of cosmic radiation, numbers of block-hours flown, or lifestyle factors--such as possible excessive sunbathing--play in the aetiology of cancer among pilots. This calls for further and more powerful studies. The excess of malignant melanoma among those flying over five time zones suggests that the importance of disturbance of the circadian rhythm should be taken into consideration in future studies.
Notes
Comment In: Occup Environ Med. 2000 Dec;57(12):84311221686
PubMed ID
10810099 View in PubMed
Less detail

Incidence of cancer among Finnish airline cabin attendants, 1967-92.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214325
Source
BMJ. 1995 Sep 9;311(7006):649-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-9-1995
Author
E. Pukkala
A. Auvinen
G. Wahlberg
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki.
Source
BMJ. 1995 Sep 9;311(7006):649-52
Date
Sep-9-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aircraft
Bone Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To assess whether occupational exposure among commercial airline cabin attendants are associated with risk of cancer.
Record linkage study.
Finland. SUBJECTS-1577 female and 187 male cabin attendants who had worked for the Finnish airline companies.
Standardised incidence ratio; expected number of cases based on national cancer incidences.
A significant excess of breast cancer (standardised incidence ratio 1.87 (95% confidence interval 1.15 to 2.23)) and bone cancer (15.10 (1.82 to 54.40)) was found among female workers. The risk of breast cancer was most prominent 15 years after recruitment. Risks of leukaemia (3.57 (0.43 to 12.9)) and skin melanoma (2.11 (0.43 to 6.15) were not significantly raised. Among men, one lymphoma and one Kaposi's sarcoma were found (expected number of cases 1.6).
Although the lifestyle of cabin attendants is different from that of the reference population--for example, in terms of social status and parity--concentration of the excess risks to primary sites sensitive to radiation suggests that ionising radiation during flights may add to the cancer risk of all flight personnel. Otherwise the lifestyle of cabin attendants did not seem to affect their risks of cancer. Estimates of the effect of reproductive risk factors only partly explained the increased risk of breast cancer. If present estimates of health hazards due to radiation are also valid for cosmic radiation, then the radiation doses of cabin attendants seem too small to account entirely for the observed excess risk.
Notes
Cites: Aviat Space Environ Med. 1990 Apr;61(4):299-3022339962
Cites: Acta Oncol. 1994;33(4):365-98018367
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1990 Oct 15;46(4):597-6032145231
Cites: Aviat Space Environ Med. 1989 Nov;60(11):1104-82818404
Cites: Health Phys. 1972 Mar;22(3):225-325015644
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1977 Dec;6(4):365-73608799
Comment In: BMJ. 1996 Jan 6;312(7022):53-48555874
Comment In: BMJ. 1996 Jan 6;312(7022):53; author reply 53-48555873
Comment In: BMJ. 1996 Jan 27;312(7025):2538563615
Comment In: BMJ. 1998 Jun 20;316(7148):19029632420
PubMed ID
7549630 View in PubMed
Less detail

21 records – page 1 of 3.