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[A certain increase of skin cancer among pilots].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184428
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Niklas Hammar
Harald Eliasch
Anette Linnersjö
Bo-Göran Dammström
Maritha Johansson
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Enheten för epidemiologi, Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. niklas.hammar@imm.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - manpower
Aircraft
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2278-912872371
PubMed ID
12872376 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute myocardial infarction occurrence: environmental links - Baku 2003-2005 data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162231
Source
Med Sci Monit. 2007 Aug;13(8):BR175-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Elyiahu Stoupel
Elchin Babayev
Elchin Babyev
Fazil Mustafa
Evgeny Abramson
Peter Israelevich
Jaquelin Sulkes
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel.
Source
Med Sci Monit. 2007 Aug;13(8):BR175-9
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Azerbaijan
Cosmic Radiation
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology
Electromagnetic fields
Finland
Humans
Meteorological Concepts
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Neutrons
Radiation
Russia
Solar Activity
United States
Abstract
Despite substantial progress in modern preventive and clinical cardiology, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains a central acute cardiac event. The aim of this study was to check the basic daily environmental-physical conditions accompanying the occurrence of AMIs in a specific geographic area: Baku, Azerbaijan.
AMIs registered in the Baku area by 21 first-aid stations (n=4919) during 2003-2005 were compared with daily geomagnetic activity (GMA) levels (I(0)-IV(0)) and cosmic ray activity (CRA), described by neutron (imp/min) and solar activity. The same comparison was made for pre-admission fatal AMIs (n=440). The cosmophysical data came from space science centers in the USA, Russia, and Finland.
AMI morbidity followed a daily distribution according to GMA, mostly on quiet (I(0)) GMA days. A monthly comparison showed inverse relationships with solar activity and GMA and correlation with CRA. The daily clinical parameters of AMI correlated with CRA. Despite the daily rise in AMI mortality on days with the highest GMA, the days with the lowest GMA and higher CRA were predominant for AMI occurrence and pre-admission mortality. One of the possible predisposing factors can be life-threatening arrhythmia.
The monthly number of AMIs was inversely related to monthly solar activity and correlated with CRA-neutron activity. Pre-admission AMI mortality was inversely linked with GMA. Daily AMI pre-admission mortality rose with concomitant GMA; low-GMA and higher-neutron-activity AMIs occurred much more frequently and were more strongly related to the number of fatal pre-admission AMIs. The clinical course of AMI was linked with CRA level.
Notes
Erratum In: Med Sci Monit. 2007 Oct;13(10):LE16Babyev, Elchin [corrected to Babayev, Elchin]
PubMed ID
17660721 View in PubMed
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Aircrew exposure from cosmic radiation on commercial airline routes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193325
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2001;93(4):293-314
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
B J Lewis
M J McCall
A R Green
L G Bennett
M. Pierre
U J Schrewe
K. O'Brien
E. Felsberger
Author Affiliation
Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7K 7B4. lewis-b@rmc.ca
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2001;93(4):293-314
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Altitude
Aviation
Canada
Cosmic Radiation
Humans
Occupational Exposure
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - instrumentation - methods
Abstract
As a result of the recent recommendations of the ICRP 60, and in anticipation of possible regulation on occupational exposure of Canadian-based aircrew, an extensive study was carried out by the Royal Military College of Canada over a one-year period to measure the cosmic radiation at commercial jet altitudes. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter was used to measure the ambient total dose equivalent rate on 62 flight routes, resulting in over 20,000 data points at one-minute intervals at various altitudes and geomagnetic latitudes (i.e. which span the full cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field). These data were then compared to similar experimental work at the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, using a different suite of equipment, to measure separately the low and high linear energy transfer components of the mixed radiation field, and to predictions with the LUIN transport code. All experimental and theoretical results were in excellent agreement. From these data, a semiempirical model was developed to allow for the interpolation of the dose rate for any global position, altitude and date (i.e. heliocentric potential). Through integration of the dose rate function over a great circle flight path, a computer code was developed to provide an estimate of the total dose equivalent on any route worldwide at any period in the solar cycle.
PubMed ID
11548357 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the seasonal pattern in suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178877
Source
J Affect Disord. 2004 Aug;81(2):133-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Timo Partonen
Jari Haukka
Heikki Nevanlinna
Jouko Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland. timo.partonen@ktl.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2004 Aug;81(2):133-9
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cosmic Radiation
Electromagnetic fields
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Seasons
Solar Activity
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Suicide has been attributed to social and psychological factors but also to geophysical effects. Of the latter, changes in solar radiation and geomagnetic activities may contribute to the frequency and the seasonal pattern of suicides.
We studied with a population-based, nationwide analysis all the individuals who committed suicide (n=27,469) in Finland during the period of 1979 to 1999. The daily data on the number of suicides, and the mean and maximum levels of geomagnetic activity were compiled and modelled with Poisson regression using the number of inhabitants in each province as the denominator. Time series analysis of monthly numbers of suicides was carried out using a seasonal-trend decomposition procedure.
There was a strong seasonal effect on suicide occurrence (P
PubMed ID
15306138 View in PubMed
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Anencephalus, drinking water, geomagnetism and cosmic radiation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247727
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1979 Jan;109(1):88-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1979
Author
V E Archer
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1979 Jan;109(1):88-97
Date
Jan-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anencephaly - mortality
Canada
Cosmic Radiation
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Magnesium - analysis
Magnetics
Population Growth
Pregnancy
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
The mortality rates from anencephalus from 1950-1969 in Canadian cities are shown to be strongly correlated with city growth rate and with horizontal geomagnetic flux, which is directly related to the intensity of cosmic radiation. They are also shown to have some association with the magnesium content of drinking water. Prior work with these data which showed associations with magnesium in drinking water, mean income, latitude and longitude was found to be inadequate because it dismissed the observed geographic associations as having little biological meaning, and because the important variables of geomagnetism and city growth rate were overlooked.
PubMed ID
433919 View in PubMed
Less detail

An estimation of Canadian population exposure to cosmic rays.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151423
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2009 Aug;48(3):317-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Jing Chen
Rachel Timmins
Kyle Verdecchia
Tatsuhiko Sato
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau Health Canada, Ottawa, Canada. jing_chen@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2009 Aug;48(3):317-22
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cosmic Radiation
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Radiation Dosage
Abstract
The worldwide average exposure to cosmic rays contributes to about 16% of the annual effective dose from natural radiation sources. At ground level, doses from cosmic ray exposure depend strongly on altitude, and weakly on geographical location and solar activity. With the analytical model PARMA developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, annual effective doses due to cosmic ray exposure at ground level were calculated for more than 1,500 communities across Canada which cover more than 85% of the Canadian population. The annual effective doses from cosmic ray exposure in the year 2000 during solar maximum ranged from 0.27 to 0.72 mSv with the population-weighted national average of 0.30 mSv. For the year 2006 during solar minimum, the doses varied between 0.30 and 0.84 mSv, and the population-weighted national average was 0.33 mSv. Averaged over solar activity, the Canadian population-weighted average annual effective dose due to cosmic ray exposure at ground level is estimated to be 0.31 mSv.
PubMed ID
19381671 View in PubMed
Less detail

An estimation of Canadian population exposure to cosmic rays from air travel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119102
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2013 Mar;52(1):59-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Jing Chen
Dustin Newton
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, 2720 Riverside Drive, Ottawa K1A 0K9, Canada. jing_chen@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2013 Mar;52(1):59-64
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Travel - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Cosmic Radiation
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Abstract
Based on air travel statistics in 1984, it was estimated that less than 4 % of the population dose from cosmic ray exposure would result from air travel. In the present study, cosmic ray doses were calculated for more than 3,000 flights departing from more than 200 Canadian airports using actual flight profiles. Based on currently available air travel statistics, the annual per capita effective dose from air transportation is estimated to be 32 µSv for Canadians, about 10 % of the average cosmic ray dose received at ground level (310 µSv per year).
PubMed ID
23138886 View in PubMed
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Apollo-Soyuz light-flash observations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5367
Source
Life Sci Space Res. 1977;15:141-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
T F Budinger
C A Tobias
R H Huesman
F T Upham
T F Wieskamp
R A Hoffman
Author Affiliation
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, Calif., USA.
Source
Life Sci Space Res. 1977;15:141-6
Date
1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Atlantic Ocean
Cosmic Radiation
Dark Adaptation
Heavy Ions
Humans
Light
Magnetics
Phosphenes - physiology
Protons
Retina - radiation effects
Solar Activity
South America
Space Flight
Vision - radiation effects
Visual Perception - radiation effects
Weightlessness
Abstract
While dark adapted, two Apollo-Soyuz astronauts saw eighty-two light flash events during a complete 51 degrees orbit which passed near the north magnetic pole and through the South Atlantic Anomaly. The frequency of events at the polar parts of the orbit is 25 times that noted in equatorial latitudes and no increased frequency was noted in the South Atlantic Anomaly at the 225-km altitude. The expected flux of heavy particles at the northern and southern points is 1-2 min-1 per eye, and the efficiency for seeing HZE particles which were below the Cerenkov threshold is 50%.
PubMed ID
11958208 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of the cosmic radiation exposure on Canadian-based routes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196836
Source
Health Phys. 2000 Nov;79(5):568-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
P. Tume
B J Lewis
L G Bennett
M. Pierre
T. Cousins
B E Hoffarth
T A Jones
J R Brisson
Author Affiliation
Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario. tumep@aecl.ca
Source
Health Phys. 2000 Nov;79(5):568-75
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Calibration
Canada
Cosmic Radiation
Humans
Occupational Exposure
Radiometry
Abstract
As a result of the recent recommendations of the ICRP-60 and in anticipation of possible regulation on occupational exposure of commercial aircrew, a two-phase investigation was carried out over a 1-y period to determine the total dose equivalent on representative Canadian-based flight routes. In the first phase of the study, dedicated scientific flights on a Northern round-trip route between Ottawa and Resolute Bay provided the opportunity to characterize the complex mixed-radiation field and to intercompare various instrumentation using both a conventional suite of powered detectors and passive dosimetry. In the second phase, volunteer aircrew carried (passive) neutron bubble detectors during their routine flight duties. From these measurements, the total dose equivalent was derived for a given route with a knowledge of the neutron fraction as determined from the scientific flights and computer code (CARI-3C) calculations. This study has yielded an extensive database of over 3,100 measurements providing the total dose equivalent for 385 different routes. By folding in flight frequency information and the accumulated flight hours, the annual occupational exposures of 20 flight crew have been determined. This study has indicated that most Canadian-based domestic and international aircrew will exceed the proposed annual ICRP-60 public limit of 1 mSv y(-1) but will be well below the occupational limit of 20 mSv y(-1).
PubMed ID
11045532 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Assessment of the irradiation levels of different population groups in the RSFSR].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236858
Source
Gig Sanit. 1986 Jul;(7):36-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1986

60 records – page 1 of 6.