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37 records – page 1 of 4.

Addison's disease. Three cases seen among Indians and Eskimos of Hudson Bay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1750
Source
Medical Services Journal, Canada. 1963 Sep; 19:647-652.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
Author
Monahan, G.J.
Author Affiliation
Fort Churchill Military Hospital
Source
Medical Services Journal, Canada. 1963 Sep; 19:647-652.
Date
1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adrenal insufficiency
Addison Disease
Canada
Corticotropin
Cortisone
Depression
Desoxycorticosterone
Hallucinations
Hydrocortisone
Indians, North American
Inuits
Isoniazid
Sodium Chloride
Streptomycin
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2241.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 982.
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Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in the Treatment of Human C1q Deficiency: The Karolinska Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283107
Source
Transplantation. 2016 Jun;100(6):1356-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Richard F Olsson
Stefan Hagelberg
Bodil Schiller
Olle Ringdén
Lennart Truedsson
Anders Åhlin
Source
Transplantation. 2016 Jun;100(6):1356-62
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Complement C1q - deficiency
Cortisone - adverse effects
Cyclosporine - administration & dosage
Fatal Outcome
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - etiology - mortality
Graft vs Host Disease - etiology
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - adverse effects
Heterozygote
Humans
Infant
Iraq
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - therapy
Lymphoproliferative Disorders - etiology
Male
Methotrexate - administration & dosage
Postoperative Complications
Rituximab - administration & dosage
Sweden
Time Factors
Transplantation Conditioning - methods
Transplantation, Homologous - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Human C1q deficiency is associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and increased susceptibility to severe bacterial infections. These patients require extensive medical therapy and some develop treatment-resistant disease. Because C1q is produced by monocytes, it has been speculated that allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) may cure this disorder.
We have so far treated 5 patients with C1q deficiency. In 3 cases, SLE symptoms remained relatively mild after the start of medical therapy, but 2 patients developed treatment-resistant SLE, and we decided to pursue treatment with allo-HSCT. For this purpose, we chose a conditioning regimen composed of treosulfan (14 g/m) and fludarabine (30 mg/m) started on day -6 and given for 3 and 5 consecutive days, respectively. Thymoglobulin was given at a cumulative dose of 8 mg/kg, and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis was composed of cyclosporine and methotrexate.
A 9-year-old boy and a 12-year-old girl with refractory SLE restored C1q production after allo-HSCT. This resulted in normal functional properties of the classical complement pathway followed by reduced severity of SLE symptoms. The boy developed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease, which resolved after treatment with rituximab and donor lymphocyte infusion. Unfortunately, donor lymphocyte infusion induced severe cortisone-resistant gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease, and the patient died from multiple organ failure 4 months after transplantation. The girl is doing well 33 months after transplantation, and clinically, all signs of SLE have resolved.
Allo-HSCT can cure SLE in human C1q deficiency and should be considered early in subjects resistant to medical therapy.
PubMed ID
26516671 View in PubMed
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Calcium supplementation and risk of dementia in women with cerebrovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282470
Source
Neurology. 2016 Oct 18;87(16):1674-1680
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-18-2016
Author
Jürgen Kern
Silke Kern
Kaj Blennow
Henrik Zetterberg
Margda Waern
Xinxin Guo
Anne Börjesson-Hanson
Ingmar Skoog
Svante Östling
Source
Neurology. 2016 Oct 18;87(16):1674-1680
Date
Oct-18-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Apolipoprotein E4 - genetics
Brain - diagnostic imaging
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cortisone - administration & dosage
Dementia - complications - diet therapy - epidemiology - genetics
Dietary Supplements
Estrogens - administration & dosage
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Osteoporotic Fractures - complications - diet therapy - epidemiology - genetics
Prospective Studies
Risk
Stroke - complications - diet therapy - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden
Treatment Failure
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
To determine whether calcium supplementation is associated with the development of dementia in women after a 5-year follow-up.
This was a longitudinal population-based study. The sample was derived from the Prospective Population Study of Women and H70 Birth Cohort Study in Gothenburg, Sweden, and included 700 dementia-free women aged 70-92 years. At baseline in 2000-2001, and at follow-up in 2005-2006, the women underwent comprehensive neuropsychiatric and somatic examinations. A CT scan was performed in 447 participants at baseline. Information on the use and dosage of calcium supplements was collected. Dementia was diagnosed according to DSM-III-R criteria.
Women treated with calcium supplements (n = 98) were at a higher risk of developing dementia (odds ratio [OR] 2.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-4.37, p = 0.046) and the subtype stroke-related dementia (vascular dementia and mixed dementia) (OR 4.40, 95% CI 1.54-12.61, p = 0.006) than women not given supplementation (n = 602). In stratified analyses, calcium supplementation was associated with the development of dementia in groups with a history of stroke (OR 6.77, 95% CI 1.36-33.75, p = 0.020) or presence of white matter lesions (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.28-6.96, p = 0.011), but not in groups without these conditions.
Calcium supplementation may increase the risk of developing dementia in elderly women with cerebrovascular disease. Because our sample was relatively small and the study was observational, these findings need to be confirmed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27534711 View in PubMed
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[CATAMNESTIC DATA ON CHILDREN WITH RHEUMOCARDITIS TREATED WITH HORMONE PREPARATIONS.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14957
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1963;27:18-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963

Cortisone in the treatment of phlyctenular keratoconjunctivitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2474
Source
American Journal of Ophthalmology. 34:357-360.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1951
Author
Thygeson, P.
Fritz, M.H.
Author Affiliation
University of California (San Francisco)
Source
American Journal of Ophthalmology. 34:357-360.
Date
1951
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
PKC
Cortisone acetate
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2515.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 1079.
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The effects of GH replacement therapy on cardiac morphology and function, exercise capacity and serum lipids in elderly patients with GH deficiency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49669
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2004 Jul;61(1):113-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Targ Elgzyri
Jan Castenfors
Erik Hägg
Christer Backman
Marja Thorén
Margareta Bramnert
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden. targ.elgzyri@skane.se
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2004 Jul;61(1):113-22
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cholesterol - blood
Cortisone - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Echocardiography
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Growth Hormone - deficiency - therapeutic use
Heart - drug effects - physiopathology
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Hypopituitarism - blood - pathology - physiopathology
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Testosterone - administration & dosage
Thyroxine - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess effects of GH replacement therapy on cardiac structure and function, exercise capacity as well as serum lipids in elderly patients with GH deficiency (GHD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-one patients (six females, 25 males), aged 60-79 years (mean 68 years) with GHD on stable cortisone and thyroxine substitution were studied. All men with gonadotropin deficiency had testosterone and one woman had oestrogen replacement. They were randomized in a double-blind manner to GH or placebo treatment for 6 months, followed by another 12 months GH (Humatrope, Eli Lilly & Co, Uppsala, Sweden). GH dose was 0.017 mg/kg/week for 1 month and then 0.033 mg/kg/week divided into daily subcutaneous injections at bedtime. Echocardiography, exercise capacity tests and serum lipid measurements were performed at 0, 6, 12 and 18 months. RESULTS: During the 6-month placebo-controlled period there were no significant changes in the placebo group, but in the GH-treated group there was a significant increase in IGF-I to normal levels for age, with median IGF-I from 6.9 to 18.5 nmol/l, increase in resting heart rate and maximal working capacity. During the open GH study, IGF-I increased from 8.7 to 19.2 nmol/l at 6 months and 18.8 nmol/l at 12 months (P
PubMed ID
15212653 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.