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[A comparative study of the evolution of atherosclerosis in men over a 25-year period in 11 European and Asiatic cities]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54287
Source
Arkh Patol. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A M Vikhert
V S Zhdanov
N H Sternby
J. Dusková
I E Galakhov
Author Affiliation
A. L. Myasnikov Institute of Clinical Cardiology, Russian Cardiologic Scientific Centre, Moscow.
Source
Arkh Patol. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):3-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aorta - pathology
Arteriosclerosis - ethnology - pathology
Asia, Central - epidemiology
Autopsy - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
Continental Population Groups
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Disease Progression
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Repeated epidemiologic study of atherosclerosis in males on the basis of autopsy material with 25-year interval (1963-66 and 1985-89) has been performed in 7 European cities (Malmö, Praha, Riga, Tallinn, Tartu, Kharkov, Yalta) and 4 Asia cities (Ashkhabad, Bishkek, Irkutsk, Yakutsk). Accelerated development of atherosclerosis in the 2nd study has been revealed in males in the majority of cities except Malmö and Praha. No significant differences in atherosclerosis of aorta and coronary arteries were found in these two cities. An increase of the calcinosis surface in the coronary arteries combined with a higher incidence of coronary stenosis was typical for the 2nd study. Atherosclerosis was less pronounced in the indigenous population of Ashkhabad, Bishkek and Yakutsk in both studied than in non-indigenous populations. There was a positive correlation in males between lethality of coronary heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases and the degree of coronary atherosclerosis. Thus, the course of atherosclerosis can change within the life of one generation.
PubMed ID
9949896 View in PubMed
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ADAM8 and its single nucleotide polymorphism 2662 T/G are associated with advanced atherosclerosis and fatal myocardial infarction: Tampere vascular study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149907
Source
Ann Med. 2009;41(7):497-507
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Mari Levula
Nina Airla
Niku Oksala
Jussi A Hernesniemi
Markku Pelto-Huikko
Juha-Pekka Salenius
Rainer Zeitlin
Otso Järvinen
Ari-Pekka J Huovila
Seppo T Nikkari
Olli Jaakkola
Erkki Ilveskoski
Jussi Mikkelsson
Markus Perola
Reijo Laaksonen
Leena Kytömäki
Juhani T Soini
Mika Kähönen
Jyrki Parkkinen
Pekka J Karhunen
Terho Lehtimäki
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Atherosclerosis Genetics, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Tampere University Hospital and Department of Clinical Chemistry, Medical School, University of Tampere, Finland. mari.levula@uta.fi
Source
Ann Med. 2009;41(7):497-507
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ADAM Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Adult
Alleles
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Expression
Health Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - genetics - mortality
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Up-Regulation - genetics
Abstract
Previously, we scanned all 23,000 human genes for differential expression between normal and atherosclerotic tissues and found the involvement of ADAM8.
We investigated the expression of ADAM8 mRNA and protein level in human atherosclerotic tissues and non-atherosclerotic internal thoracic arteries as well as the association of ADAM8 2662 T/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) with the extent of coronary atherosclerosis and with the risk of fatal myocardial infarction.
ADAM8 mRNA was up-regulated in carotid, aortic, and femoral atherosclerotic plaques (n=24) when compared with non-atherosclerotic arteries. ADAM8 protein expression was increased in advanced atherosclerotic plaques as compared to control vessels wherein it was localized to macrophages and smooth muscle cells The G allele carriers of the ADAM8 2662 T/G SNP had significantly larger areas of fibrotic, calcified, and complicated plaques in coronary arteries (P=0.027, P=0.011, and P=0.011, respectively) and significantly higher occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) (P=0.004) and fatal pre-hospital MI (P=0.003) than did the TT homozygotes.
ADAM8 is a promising candidate to be involved in atherosclerosis, and its 2662 T/G allelic variant significantly associates with advanced atherosclerotic lesion areas and MI.
PubMed ID
19575316 View in PubMed
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Adolescence risk factors are predictive of coronary artery calcification at middle age: the cardiovascular risk in young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120679
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Oct 9;60(15):1364-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-2012
Author
Olli Hartiala
Costan G Magnussen
Sami Kajander
Juhani Knuuti
Heikki Ukkonen
Antti Saraste
Irina Rinta-Kiikka
Sakari Kainulainen
Mika Kähönen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Tomi Laitinen
Terho Lehtimäki
Jorma S A Viikari
Jaakko Hartiala
Markus Juonala
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, and Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. olli.hartiala@utu.fi
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Oct 9;60(15):1364-70
Date
Oct-9-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Calcinosis - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the roles of adolescence risk factors in predicting coronary artery calcium (CAC).
Elevated coronary heart disease risk factor levels in adolescence may predict subsequent CAC independently of change in risk factor levels from adolescence to adulthood.
CAC was assessed in 589 subjects 40 to 46 years of age from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Risk factor levels were measured in 1980 (12 to 18 years) and in 2007.
The prevalence of any CAC was 19.2% (27.9% in men and 12.2% in women). Age, levels of systolic blood pressure (BP), total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adolescence, as well as systolic BP, total cholesterol, diastolic BP, and pack-years of smoking in adulthood were higher among subjects with CAC than those without CAC. Adolescence LDL-C and systolic BP levels predicted CAC in adulthood independently of 27-year changes in these risk factors. The multivariable odds ratios were 1.34 (95% confidence interval: 1.05 to 1.70; p=0.02) and 1.38 (95% confidence interval: 1.08 to 1.77; p=0.01), for 1-SD increase in adolescence LDL-C and systolic BP, respectively. Exposure to both of these risk factors in adolescence (defined as values at or above the age- and sex-specific 75th percentile) substantially increased the risk of CAC (multivariable odds ratio: 3.5 [95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 7.2; p=0.007]) between groups with no versus both risk factors.
Elevated adolescence LDL-C and systolic BP levels are independent predictors of adulthood CAC, indicating that adolescence risk factor levels play an important role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Oct 9;60(15):1371-322981554
PubMed ID
22981553 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent interaction of apolipoprotein E gene with eastern birthplace in Finland affects severity of coronary atherosclerosis and risk of fatal myocardial infarction--Helsinki Sudden Death Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119352
Source
Ann Med. 2013 May;45(3):213-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Petri Tyynelä
Sirkka Goebeler
Erkki Ilveskoski
Jussi Mikkelsson
Markus Perola
Terho Lehtimäki
Pekka J Karhunen
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. petri.tyynela@uta.fi
Source
Ann Med. 2013 May;45(3):213-9
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alleles
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - mortality
Plaque, Atherosclerotic - pathology
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) has been constantly higher in eastern late settlement regions compared to western early settlements in Finland, unrelated to classical risk factors. In line with this, eastern birthplace was an age-dependent predictor of severe coronary atherosclerosis and pre-hospital sudden coronary death among male residents of Helsinki. We investigated a possible interaction of apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene with birthplace on the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary atherosclerosis.
APOE genotypes were analyzed in the Helsinki Sudden Death Study series comprising out-of-hospital deaths among males aged 33-70 years (n = 577), who were born in high (east, n = 273) or low (west, n = 304) CHD mortality area.
Eastern-born men = 55 years carried 30% more often (P = 0.017) and older men 40% less often (P = 0.022) the APOE ?4 allele compared to western-born men (P = 0.003 for birthplace-by-age interaction). In multivariate analysis, the ?4 allele associated with the risk of out-of-hospital MI (odds ratio 2.58; 95% CI 1.20-5.55; P = 0.016) only in eastern-born men and with advanced atherosclerosis in both regions of origin, respectively.
Birthplace-bound risk of CHD was age-dependently modified by APOE ?4 allele, suggesting genetic differences in CHD susceptibility between early and late settlement regions in Finland and providing one explanation for the eastern high mortality.
PubMed ID
23110590 View in PubMed
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[Anatomical types of coronary circulation and various lesions of the right coronary artery]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54573
Source
Klin Khir. 1997;(5-6):6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
D N Maistrenko
Author Affiliation
Institut serdechno-sosudistoi khirurgii AMN Ukrainy, g. Kiev.
Source
Klin Khir. 1997;(5-6):6-7
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - pathology - surgery
Coronary Vessels - pathology - surgery
English Abstract
Humans
Abstract
The data on coronarography, conducted in clinic to 1249 patients in 1994-1996 yrs., and intraoperative data, obtained in the patients with a coronaris dextra (ACD) affection and its concurrent affection with a coronaris sinistra (ACS) operated on in clinic in 1974-1996 yrs., were analyzed. It was established that the frequency of severe affection of endothelium of ACD while the existence of the left coronary blood circulation (CBC) type 2.5 times as higher than that while the presence of its right or balanced kinds. The most frequent atherosclerosis occurrence in the proximal ACD portion creates the anatomical prerequisites for the broad application of surgical treatment methods of coronary insufficiency.
PubMed ID
9440983 View in PubMed
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Angiographic predictors of new coronary occlusions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54795
Source
Am Heart J. 1995 Mar;129(3):515-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
M K Pétursson
E H Jónmundsson
A. Brekkan
T. Hardarson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Am Heart J. 1995 Mar;129(3):515-20
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Disease - radiography
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Abstract
To determine whether coronary angiography is predictive of the future site of coronary occlusion, we analyzed the coronary angiograms of 246 consecutive patients having two or more angiograms without therapeutic invasive intervention in the interval between angiograms. The average interval between studies was 46 months. Of 2183 normal segments at the first angiogram, 51 (2.3%) were occluded at the second angiogram, whereas in segments with minimal disease (1% to 25% diameter stenosis) 33 (8%) of 411 were occluded (p
PubMed ID
7872182 View in PubMed
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Association between cardiac pathology and fat tissue distribution in an autopsy series of men without premortem evidence of cardiovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54682
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1996 Mar;20(3):245-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
M L Kortelainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1996 Mar;20(3):245-52
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Aging
Body Composition
Body constitution
Body mass index
Brown Fat - pathology
Cardiomegaly - pathology
Coronary Disease - complications - pathology
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Humans
Male
Myocardium - pathology
Obesity - complications
Organ Size
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between cardiovascular status and body fat tissue distribution in men without any premortem clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease. SUBJECTS: 30 forensic autopsy cases which consisted of sudden deaths resulting from accidental causes, suicides or homicides or from unexpected natural causes. METHODS: Body height and weight, the circumferences of the waist and hip and the thicknesses of the subscapular and abdominal subcutaneous fat were measured, and Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist-to-Hip ratio (WHR) were calculated. Perirenal, omental and mesenterial fat deposits were weighed and supraclavicular-pericarotid and perirenal-periadrenal fat was excised and serial samples analyzed for brown adipose tissue (BAT) by computerized image analysis. The heart weight was indexed for height. The degree of coronary narrowing was determined in each artery, and myocardial collagen volume fraction and myocyte cross-sectional area were measured. RESULTS: There were significantly positive correlations between age and the degree of coronary arteriosclerosis and heart weight/height. After adjusting for age, BMI and waist circumference had a significant positive correlation with all the cardiac parameters. The degree of coronary narrowing and heart weight/height were related to tertiles of BMI and waist circumstance. The age-adjusted correlations between the subscapular fat thickness and cardiac parameters were significant and positive, and perirenal fat weight also had a significantly positive association with all the cardiac parameters. BAT decreased with age and when adjusted for age, the cervical BAT percentage had a significant negative correlation with waist circumference and WHR, and a significant negative correlation was also found between cervical BAT and the degree of coronary arteriosclerosis and between perirenal BAT and heart weight/height. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that body fatness is associated with coronary and myocardial pathology in men without any clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease. An abdominal accumulation of fat seems to be connected with both the severity of coronary lesions and myocardial hypertrophy in men, in whom there is also a connection between abdominal obesity and a relative scarcity of BAT. Future investigations will require more detailed analyses of the extent and ultrastructural of coronary artery lesions in order to obtain more specific information on the relationship of body fat distribution to the early asymptomatic phase of coronary disease in younger individuals.
PubMed ID
8653146 View in PubMed
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Atherosclerosis in Alaska Natives and non-natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5191
Source
Lancet. 1993 Apr 24;341(8852):1056-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-1993
Author
W P Newman
J P Middaugh
M T Propst
D R Rogers
Author Affiliation
Louisiana State University Medical School, New Orleans 70112.
Source
Lancet. 1993 Apr 24;341(8852):1056-7
Date
Apr-24-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Aorta, Abdominal - pathology
Aortic Diseases - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Low mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) among Eskimos has been attributed to less atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries because of a high dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids. Other investigators attribute this low mortality to the fact that Eskimos have a high mortality from other causes before middle age, when CHD is common. However, most studies have been epidemiological, either by death-certificate review or risk-factor evaluation. We evaluated the extent of atherosclerotic lesions in the coronary arteries and aortas from Alaska Natives. Standardised comparisons between samples from 103 Native and 101 non-native residents show that the extent of raised lesions increases with age in both groups, but the prevalence of raised lesions in native specimens was consistently lower than in those from non-natives. This difference was statistically significant. The data suggest that the differences in CHD mortality between Alaska Natives and non-natives are, at least in part, the result of less atherosclerosis in natives.
PubMed ID
8096960 View in PubMed
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110 records – page 1 of 11.