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[Acute myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury: role of nitric oxide system]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53337
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2004;50(2):34-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
O O Moibenko
M Ia Iuz'kiv
L V Tumanovs'ka
A V Kotsiuruba
Author Affiliation
A.A. Bogomoletz Institute of Physiology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev.
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2004;50(2):34-42
Date
2004
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Animals
Arginine - pharmacology
Coronary Circulation - drug effects - physiology
Coronary Vessels - metabolism
Disease Models, Animal
Dogs
English Abstract
Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology
Male
Myocardial Reperfusion Injury - enzymology - metabolism - physiopathology
Nitric Oxide - biosynthesis - physiology
Nitric Oxide Synthase - antagonists & inhibitors
Nitroarginine - pharmacology
Abstract
In experiments on the closed-chest dogs it was shown that NOS inhibition resulted in the significant alterations of hemodynamic indices (coronary and peripheral vascular resistance, cardiac output and heart rate) under local myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in comparison with control experiments. At the first time it was shown that NOS inhibition activated the autophagic destruction of cardiomyocytes in the ischemic myocardium and could reduce an area of functionally active myocardium. L-arginine administration attenuated cardio- and hemodynamic disturbances, that substantially improved the course of ischemia/reperfusion, diminished the ultrastructural changes in myocardium and prevented development of autophagic programmed cell death.
PubMed ID
15174204 View in PubMed
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Atherosclerosis in coronary arteries and aorta among Greenlanders: an autopsy study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3446
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2003 Sep;170(1):93-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Henning Sloth Pedersen
Gert Mulvad
William P Newman
Donald A Boudreau
Author Affiliation
The Primary Health Care Clinic, P.O. Box 1001, DK-3900 Nuuk, Greenland. hsp@greennet.gl
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2003 Sep;170(1):93-103
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aorta, Abdominal - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
Aorta, Thoracic - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
Autopsy
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology - pathology
Coronary Vessels - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - pathology
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, VLDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
In a cross-sectional autopsy study of 107 Inuit in Greenland, the extent of arterial surface involvement with atherosclerosis was evaluated in the presence of known or estimated environmental risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD): age, gender, obesity, serum lipids, smoking, and hypertension. Mean, median, and range values for all of the risk factor variables and for the extent of atherosclerosis in the thoracic aorta, abdominal aorta, right coronary artery, and left anterior descending coronary artery are reported by age strata, along with the results of covariant analysis of the dependence of the extent of atherosclerosis upon the risk factors. No significant differences between females and males were found in either the risk factors or prevalence and extent of atherosclerosis in the aorta and in the coronary arteries. It appears that the extent of advanced atherosclerotic lesions in Greenlanders appears to be the same as that previously reported in a similar study in Alaska Natives.
PubMed ID
12957687 View in PubMed
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Coronary artery calcium and physical performance as determinants of mortality in older age: the AGES-Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259231
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Oct 3;168(3):2094-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-2013
Author
Mikaela B von Bonsdorff
Danielle A I Groffen
Jean-Sebastien Vidal
Taina Rantanen
Palmi V Jonsson
Melissa Garcia
Thor Aspelund
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Kristin Siggeirsdóttir
Lenore Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Tamara B Harris
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Oct 3;168(3):2094-9
Date
Oct-3-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Calcinosis - mortality - physiopathology - radiography
Calcium - metabolism
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - physiopathology - radiography
Coronary Vessels - metabolism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Multidetector Computed Tomography
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate - trends
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Coronary artery calcium (CAC) and physical performance have been shown to be associated with mortality, but it is not clear whether one of them modifies the association. We investigated the association between the extent of CAC and physical performance among older individuals and explored these individual and combined effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and non-CVD mortality.
We studied 4074 participants of the AGES-Reykjavik Study who were free from coronary heart disease, had a CAC score calculated from computed tomography scans and had data on mobility limitations and gait speed at baseline in 2002-2006 at a mean age of 76 years. Register-based mortality was available until 2009.
Odds for mobility limitation and slow gait increased according to the extent of CAC. Altogether 645 persons died during the follow-up. High CAC, mobility limitation and slow gait were independent predictors of CVD mortality and non-CVD mortality. The joint effect of CAC and gait speed on non-CVD mortality was synergistic, i.e. compared to having low CAC and normal gait, the joint effect of high CAC and slow gait exceeded the additive effect of these individual exposures on non-CVD mortality. For CVD mortality, the effect was additive i.e. the joint effect of high CAC and slow gait did not exceed the sum of the individual exposures.
The extent of CAC and decreased physical performance were independent predictors of mortality and the joint presence of these risk factors increased the risk of non-CVD mortality above and beyond the individual effects.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23414742 View in PubMed
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Expression of estrogen receptors in the coronary arteries of young and premenopausal women in relation to central obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53414
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Apr;28(4):623-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
M-L Kortelainen
P. Huttunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. Marja-Leena.Kortelainen@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Apr;28(4):623-7
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - pathology
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - etiology - metabolism - pathology
Coronary Vessels - metabolism
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - metabolism - pathology
Premenopause - metabolism
Receptors, Estrogen - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tunica Intima - pathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of coronary estrogen receptor (ER) expression with atherosclerotic lesions and central fat accumulation in premenopausal women. SUBJECTS: A total of 52 female forensic autopsy cases aged between 18 and 49 y. METHODS: Height, body weight and waist and hip circumferences were measured and body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were calculated. Intima thickness or maximal thickness of the plaque were measured from samples taken from the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Macrophage infiltration and smooth muscle cells were localized by immunostaining. ER was detected immunohistochemically and by Western blot analysis, and the ER immunopositive area in the intima was measured. RESULTS: ER immunoreactivity was observed in the intima in 60% of the samples, and it was most intense in the advanced plaques near the lipid core next to the maximal intensity of macrophage staining. The ER immunopositive area had a significant positive correlation with LAD intima thickness, which in turn was significantly correlated with waist circumference and WHR when adjusted for age and BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Premenopausal women with the central type of fat accumulation have advanced coronary plaques in which ER expression is localized near the lipid-rich and macrophage-rich zone. The higher expression of ER in the arterial plaques may represent a compensatory mechanism against atherosclerosis.
PubMed ID
14758343 View in PubMed
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Myocardial substrates in children with congenital heart disease: relationship to substrate supply, age, growth and desaturation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87539
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Nov;96(11):1677-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Amark Kerstin
Ekroth Rolf
Nilsson Krister
Sunnegårdh Jan
Söderberg Björn
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. kerstin.amark@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Nov;96(11):1677-80
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3-Hydroxybutyric Acid - blood
Adolescent
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Blood Chemical Analysis
Blood glucose
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Vessels - metabolism
Fatty Acids - blood
Glutamic Acid - blood
Growth and development
Heart Catheterization
Heart Defects, Congenital - metabolism
Humans
Infant
Lactic Acid - blood
Leucine - blood
Myocardial Ischemia - metabolism
Myocardium - metabolism
Oxygen consumption
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
AIM: The myocardial uptake of substrates in children has only been investigated on a small scale. The purpose of this study was to define myocardial substrate uptake in relation to the arterial supply of substrates, age, growth and oxygen saturation. METHODS: Thirty patients with congenital heart disease, aged 3 months to 16 years, were studied during cardiac catheterization. Arterial and coronary sinus blood was analyzed for the major fuel metabolites and amino acids. RESULTS: The uptake of all major substrates correlated significantly with the arterial supply: free fatty acids (r = 0.52, p = 0.004), beta-hydroxybutyrate (r = 0.74, p
PubMed ID
17937693 View in PubMed
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Women, cardiac syndrome X, and microvascular heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126060
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 Mar-Apr;28(2 Suppl):S42-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Heather M Arthur
Pat Campbell
Paula J Harvey
Michael McGillion
Paul Oh
Elizabeth Woodburn
Corinne Hodgson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. arthurh@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 Mar-Apr;28(2 Suppl):S42-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Chest Pain - metabolism - physiopathology
Coronary Angiography - methods
Coronary Vessels - metabolism - physiopathology
Cost of Illness
Disease Management
Female
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Microvascular Angina - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Microvessels - metabolism - physiopathology
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - metabolism - physiopathology
Postmenopause - metabolism
Prognosis
Research
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Time
Abstract
New data suggest that persistent chest pain, despite normal coronary angiography, is less benign than previously thought. It has long been recognized that cardiac syndrome X (CSX) is associated with significant suffering, disability, and health care costs, but the biggest shift in thinking comes in terms of long-term risk. It is now recognized that the prognosis is not benign and that a significant proportion of patients are at increased cardiovascular disease risk. Of major debate is the question of whether the mechanisms that explain this chest pain are cardiac vs noncardiac. The most current definition of CSX is the triad of angina, ischemia, and normal coronary arteries, which is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. This paper provides a review of CSX, epidemiology of the problem, proposed explanatory mechanisms, and important next steps in research. Central to this review is the proposition that new insights into CSX will be fostered by both clinical and scientific collaboration between cardiovascular and pain scientists.
PubMed ID
22424283 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.