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Adaptation to myocardial ischemia during repeated ventricular pacing in patients with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46178
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2000;34(2):134-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
K. Ylitalo
K. Peuhkurinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2000;34(2):134-41
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Pacing, Artificial
Coronary Disease - therapy
Female
Hemodynamic Processes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - prevention & control
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether repeated ventricular pacing is able to induce adaptation against ischemia in coronary artery disease patients. DESIGN: Fifteen patients with documented coronary artery disease were subjected to two successive periods of rapid ventricular pacing (150 bpm) of equal length (295+/-33 s), the first being limited by intolerable anginal pain. The second pacing period, of the same length as the first, was initiated after the disappearance of angina and ST depression, the mean resting time being 433+/-30 s. Blood samples for the determination of transcardiac differences in glucose, lactate, free fatty acids, K+, pCO2, pH, oxygen saturation and noradrenaline were taken from the femoral artery and coronary sinus before and at the end of each pacing period. The mechanical performance of the hearts was followed by continuous monitoring of intra-arterial blood pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and the observed adaptation in the measured variables during the successive pacing tests was correlated with the duration of angina, severity of coronary artery disease and degree of collateralization. RESULTS: Changes in the transcardiac pH and K+ differences, ST segment and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure were less pronounced during the second pacing period. The subgroup with net lactate production before or after the first pacing period demonstrated metabolic adaptation manifested as improved lactate extraction during the second pacing period. Rate-pressure product and oxygen extraction, and thus presumably also overall oxygen consumption and oxygen delivery, were similar during both tests. The magnitude of adaptation did not correlate with the duration of angina, severity of coronary artery disease or overall collateral score. CONCLUSION: Rapid ventricular pacing is able to induce adaptation to myocardial ischemia, but the exact mechanisms in this process remain to be elucidated.
PubMed ID
10872698 View in PubMed
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Any difference? Use of a CAM provider among cancer patients, coronary heart disease (CHD) patients and individuals with no cancer/CHD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128047
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012;12:1
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Agnete E Kristoffersen
Arne J Norheim
Vinjar M Fønnebø
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, National research center in complementary and alternative medicine, Tromsø, Norway. agnete.kristoffersen@uit.no
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012;12:1
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - therapy
Complementary Therapies - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Coronary Disease - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - therapy
Neoplasms - therapy
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Abstract
Although use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients has been described previously, prevalence of use has not commonly been compared to other disease groups in a true population sample where CAM use or cancer is not the main focus. The aims of the present study are to (1) examine how CAM use in cancer patients differs from people with a previous CHD diagnosis and people with no cancer or CHD diagnosis in an unselected general population and (2), investigate the use of a CAM provider among individuals with a previous cancer diagnosis.
A total of 8040 men and women aged 29 to 87 in the city of Tromsø, Norway filled in a questionnaire developed specifically for the Tromsø V study with questions on life style and health issues. Visits to a CAM provider within the last 12 months and information on cancer, heart attack and angina pectoris (heart cramp) were among the questions. 1449 respondents were excluded from the analyses.
Among the 6591 analysed respondents 331 had a prior cancer diagnosis, of whom 7.9% reported to have seen a CAM provider within the last 12 months. This did not differ significantly from neither the CHD group (6.4%, p = 0.402) nor the no cancer/CHD group (9.5%, p = 0.325).
According to this study, the proportion of cancer patients seeing a CAM provider was not statistically significantly different from patients with CHD or individuals without cancer or CHD.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22240073 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular and psychosomatic symptoms among relatives of patients waiting for possible coronary revascularization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11150
Source
Heart Lung. 1996 Nov-Dec;25(6):438-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Bengtson
T. Karlsson
P. Währborg
A. Hjalmarson
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Heart Lung. 1996 Nov-Dec;25(6):438-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Coronary Artery Bypass - methods
Coronary Disease - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Stress, Psychological - complications
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the consequences for close family members of patients on a waiting list for possible coronary revascularization. BACKGROUND: An increasing number of patients with symptomatic ischemic heart disease require evaluation for possible revascularization. Many of these patients must wait a long time before receiving treatment. The negative consequences of this long wait for patients and their relatives have not been satisfactorily evaluated previously. DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study. SETTING: All hospital in Southwestern Sweden. STUDY POPULATION: One hundred relatives of patients referred for possible revascularization and a sex- and age-matched reference group. The convenience sample consisted of 85% (n = 76) women and 15% (n = 13) men. OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency of cardiovascular and psychosomatic symptoms. EVALUATION: One hundred relatives and 100 members of the control group were sent a questionnaire to evaluate their clinical condition; working situation; use of tobacco, alcohol and sedatives; and cardiovascular and psychosomatic symptoms. RESULTS: Family members had a significantly higher frequency of anxiety, depression, and irritability compared with the control group. Furthermore, family members reported sleeping disorders, including difficulty waking, tiredness due to lack of sleep, and restless sleep, more frequently than did the control group. CONCLUSION: Close family members of patients waiting for coronary revascularization have particular difficulties, and these difficulties should receive more attention.
PubMed ID
8950122 View in PubMed
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[Effectiveness of the treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease in a military sanatorium].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241640
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1983 Sep;(9):50-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1983

[Effect of a course of Khmel'nik radon baths on the functional state of the heart with atherosclerotic damage]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56370
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1970 Nov-Dec;35(6):491-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
V P Belinskii
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1970 Nov-Dec;35(6):491-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Baths
Coronary Disease - therapy
Female
Health Resorts
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Radon - therapeutic use
Ukraine
PubMed ID
5515357 View in PubMed
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[Effect of combined health resort and climatic treatment including training on a bicycle ergometer and therapeutic gymnastics on patients 5 to 12 months after having had a myocardial infarct].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246494
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1980 Jan-Feb;(1):35-9
Publication Type
Article

[Effect of health resort-climate therapy on the contractile capacity of the myocardium of ischemic heart disease patients]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55582
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1987 Jan;(1):70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1987

[Effect of Kislovodsk health resort treatment on cardiocerebral disorders in middle-aged and old patients with arteriosclerosis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56107
Source
Vrach Delo. 1976 Sep;(9):35-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1976

The effect of problem-based learning in patient education after an event of CORONARY heart disease--a randomised study in PRIMARY health care: design and methodology of the COR-PRIM study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118846
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2012;13:110
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anita Kärner
Staffan Nilsson
Tiny Jaarsma
Agneta Andersson
Ann-Britt Wiréhn
Peter Wodlin
Lisa Hjelmfors
Pia Tingström
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Welfare studies (HAV), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. anita.karner@liu.se
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2012;13:110
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - therapy
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Primary Care Nursing - methods
Primary Health Care - methods
Problem-Based Learning - methods
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Care
Sweden
Abstract
Even though there is convincing evidence that self-care, such as regular exercise and/or stopping smoking, alters the outcomes after an event of coronary heart disease (CHD), risk factors remain. Outcomes can improve if core components of secondary prevention programmes are structurally and pedagogically applied using adult learning principles e.g. problem-based learning (PBL). Until now, most education programs for patients with CHD have not been based on such principles. The basic aim is to discover whether PBL provided in primary health care (PHC) has long-term effects on empowerment and self-care after an event of CHD.
A randomised controlled study is planned for patients with CHD. The primary outcome is empowerment to reach self-care goals. Data collection will be performed at baseline at hospital and after one, three and five years in PHC using quantitative and qualitative methodologies involving questionnaires, medical assessments, interviews, diaries and observations. Randomisation of 165 patients will take place when they are stable in their cardiac condition and have optimised cardiac medication that has not substantially changed during the last month. All patients will receive conventional care from their general practitioner and other care providers. The intervention consists of a patient education program in PHC by trained district nurses (tutors) who will apply PBL to groups of 6-9 patients meeting on 13 occasions for two hours over one year. Patients in the control group will not attend a PBL group but will receive home-sent patient information on 11 occasions during the year.
We expect that the 1-year PBL-patient education will improve patients' beliefs, self-efficacy and empowerment to achieve self-care goals significantly more than one year of standardised home-sent patient information. The assumption is that PBL will reduce cardiovascular events in the long-term and will also be cost-effective compared to controls. Further, the knowledge obtained from this study may contribute to improving patients' ability to handle self-care, and furthermore, may reduce the number of patients having subsequent CHD events in Sweden.
NCT01462799.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23164044 View in PubMed
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66 records – page 1 of 7.