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21 year trends in incidence of myocardial infarction and mortality from coronary disease in middle-age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210947
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1495-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
P. Immonen-Räihä
M. Arstila
J. Tuomilehto
M. Haikio
A. Mononen
T. Vuorenmaa
J. Torppa
I. Parvinen
Author Affiliation
Health Office City of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1495-502
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study is to describe the 21 year trends in myocardial infarction among middle-aged inhabitants in the city of Turku, in southwestern Finland. Since 1972 the coronary register in Turku has monitored acute coronary events leading to hospital admission or death, first according to the methods of the World Health Organization Heart Attack Register Study, and since 1982 according to the methods of the WHO MONICA. From 1972 to 1992 we registered 7374 events of suspected myocardial infarction, of which 6045 events occurring in inhabitants of Turku aged 35-64 years, fulfilled the criteria for myocardial infarction. Within 28 days, 2266 coronary events proved fatal. During the 21-year period, the incidence of definite myocardial infarction fell by 55% in men and by 62% in women, and coronary mortality fell by 66 and 81%, respectively. From 1972 to 1982, total mortality and coronary mortality decreased in parallel. Later on, the decrease in total mortality levelled off, even though coronary mortality fell still steeper, because mortality from external causes of death increased. The favourable long-term trends reflect favourable changes in total cholesterol and blood pressure in the middle-aged population, and the improvement in the treatment of myocardial infarction. Further efforts are needed to enhance this trend, but also to reduce total mortality among middle-aged people.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1455-68909894
PubMed ID
8909905 View in PubMed
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The 2003 Canadian recommendations for dyslipidemia management: revisions are needed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175311
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2005
Author
Douglas G Manuel
Peter Tanuseputro
Cameron A Mustard
Susan E Schultz
Geoffrey M Anderson
Sten Ardal
David A Alter
Andreas Laupacis
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ont. doug.manuel@ices.on.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-31
Date
Apr-12-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Expenditures
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Hyperlipidemias - drug therapy
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Risk factors
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Nov 8;173(10):1210; author reply 121016275979
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Nov 8;173(10):1207; author reply 121016275976
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1033-4; discussion 103715824410
Erratum In: CMAJ. 2005 Jul 19;173(2):133
PubMed ID
15824409 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use and cardiovascular health outcomes: a comparison across age and gender in the Winnipeg Health and Drinking Survey Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153263
Source
Age Ageing. 2009 Mar;38(2):206-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Wanda M Snow
Robert Murray
Okechukwa Ekuma
Suzanne L Tyas
Gordon E Barnes
Author Affiliation
Research Associate, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3A 1R9, Canada. wssnow@mts.net
Source
Age Ageing. 2009 Mar;38(2):206-12
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aging
Alcohol Drinking - mortality
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Hypertension - mortality - prevention & control
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
research has reliably demonstrated cardioprotection from regular alcohol use. Heavy episodic drinking (HED), however, negates these beneficial effects and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The impact of age on the health effects of episodic drinking has not been evaluated.
to examine the association between alcohol volume and pattern of consumption on the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality across the lifespan.
prospective, community-based cohort study of adults in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
a total of 1,154 participants (580 men and 574 women) aged 18-64 surveyed at baseline (1990-91) on alcohol consumption levels and pattern of use.
usual alcohol consumption was measured using a quantity-frequency approach. HED was estimated by asking participants how often they consumed eight or more drinks in one sitting in the past year. Questions were asked separately for wine, beer and spirits. Surveillance for cardiovascular events was conducted for 10 years (i.e. up to age 74 years). Diagnoses of CVD were obtained via health utilization records. Cox proportional hazard models were derived for both genders and for 'young adults' (baseline age 18-34), 'middle-aged adults' (baseline age 35-49) and 'older adults' (baseline 50-64). Models were adjusted for marital status, cigarette smoking status and educational level.
Reduced risk of CVD was associated with usual consumption, whereas an increased risk was associated with HED. Among male usual drinkers, cardioprotection was afforded only to middle and older age groups. The benefits of regular consumption were seen only in the youngest age group among women. The heaviest usual consumption category was associated with a decreased risk of CVD in men. Heavy episodic drinking increased the risk of coronary heart disease in middle-aged men and was marginally significant in middle-aged women. Risk of hypertension was elevated in older men with heavy episodic drinking.
The well-established relationship between regular alcohol consumption and decreased risk of CVD may not become evident until middle age or older in men. Women may benefit from usual consumption at a much younger age. In both sexes, however, these beneficial effects of alcohol use are negated when alcohol is consumed in a heavy episodic drinking pattern, particularly for middle-aged and older men.
PubMed ID
19131359 View in PubMed
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Analysing the large decline in coronary heart disease mortality in the Icelandic population aged 25-74 between the years 1981 and 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139092
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(11):e13957
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Thor Aspelund
Vilmundur Gudnason
Bergrun Tinna Magnusdottir
Karl Andersen
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Bolli Thorsson
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Julia Critchley
Kathleen Bennett
Martin O'Flaherty
Simon Capewell
Author Affiliation
Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland.
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(11):e13957
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Mortality - trends
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
Coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates have been decreasing in Iceland since the 1980s. We examined how much of the decrease between 1981 and 2006 could be attributed to medical and surgical treatments and how much to changes in cardiovascular risk factors.
The previously validated IMPACT CHD mortality model was applied to the Icelandic population. The data sources were official statistics, national quality registers, published trials and meta-analyses, clinical audits and a series of national population surveys.
Between 1981 and 2006, CHD mortality rates in Iceland decreased by 80% in men and women aged 25 to 74 years, which resulted in 295 fewer deaths in 2006 than if the 1981 rates had persisted. Incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) decreased by 66% and resulted in some 500 fewer incident MI cases per year, which is a major determinant of possible deaths from MI. Based on the IMPACT model approximately 73% (lower and upper bound estimates: 54%-93%) of the mortality decrease was attributable to risk factor reductions: cholesterol 32%; smoking 22%; systolic blood pressure 22%, and physical inactivity 5% with adverse trends for diabetes (-5%), and obesity (-4%). Approximately 25% (lower and upper bound estimates: 8%-40%) of the mortality decrease was attributable to treatments in individuals: secondary prevention 8%; heart failure treatments 6%; acute coronary syndrome treatments 5%; revascularisation 3%; hypertension treatments 2%, and statins 0.5%.
Almost three quarters of the large CHD mortality decrease in Iceland between 1981 and 2006 was attributable to reductions in major cardiovascular risk factors in the population. These findings emphasize the value of a comprehensive prevention strategy that promotes tobacco control and a healthier diet to reduce incidence of MI and highlights the potential importance of effective, evidence based medical treatments.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21103050 View in PubMed
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The analysis by Manuel and colleagues creates controversy with headlines, not data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175310
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1033-4; discussion 1037
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2005
Author
Jacques Genest
Ruth McPherson
Jiri Frohlich
George Fodor
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Que. jacques.genest@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1033-4; discussion 1037
Date
Apr-12-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Health Expenditures
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Hyperlipidemias - drug therapy
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Risk factors
Notes
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Apr 22;107(15):2059-6512707251
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Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-3115824409
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Cites: BMJ. 1992 Jul 4;305(6844):15-91638188
Comment On: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-3115824409
PubMed ID
15824410 View in PubMed
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Antioxidants and ischaemic heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207661
Source
Lancet. 1997 Aug 30;350(9078):667; author reply 668
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1997

Cod liver oil consumption, smoking, and coronary heart disease mortality: Three counties, Norway

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53879
Source
Pages 143-149 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
  1 document  
Author
Egeland, G.M
Meyer, H.E
Selmer, R
Tverdal, A
Vollset, SE
Author Affiliation
National Health Screening Service, Research Department, P.O. Box 8155, 0033 Oslo, Norway. grace.egeland@isf.uib.no
Source
Pages 143-149 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adult
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage
Cohort study
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
It has been hypothesized that omega-3 fatty acid consumption may lessen the adverse effect of smoking on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Thus, we explored whether cod liver oil consumption was protective of coronary heart disease in a cohort of men and women participating in a cardiovascular disease screening in Norway. The study population was aged 35-54 at the time of the baseline screening conducted by the National Health Screening Service of Norway in 1977-1983. Of 56,718 age-eligible men and women, 52,138 participated, of whom 42,612 (82%) completed a dietary questionnaire. Cod liver oil use was reported by 12.5%. At baseline, cod liver oil users had lower triglycerides, adjusting for age, body mass index, time since last meal and income (p
PubMed ID
11507963 View in PubMed
Documents
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Commentary: The Finnish success of cardiovascular risk factor reduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144893
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;39(2):518-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010

65 records – page 1 of 7.