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429 records – page 1 of 43.

2-year clinical outcomes after implantation of sirolimus-eluting, paclitaxel-eluting, and bare-metal coronary stents: results from the WDHR (Western Denmark Heart Registry).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89935
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-2009
Author
Kaltoft Anne
Jensen Lisette Okkels
Maeng Michael
Tilsted Hans Henrik
Thayssen Per
Bøttcher Morten
Lassen Jens Flensted
Krusell Lars Romer
Rasmussen Klaus
Hansen Knud Nørregaard
Pedersen Lars
Johnsen Søren Paaske
Sørensen Henrik Toft
Thuesen Leif
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. annekaltoft@stofanet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Date
Feb-24-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Coronary Disease - mortality - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Paclitaxel
Sirolimus
Stents - adverse effects
Thrombosis - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This registry study assessed the safety and efficacy of the 2 types of drug-eluting stents (DES), sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES), compared with bare-metal stents (BMS). BACKGROUND: Drug-eluting stents may increase the risk of stent thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI), and death. METHODS: A total of 12,395 consecutive patients with coronary intervention and stent implantation recorded in the Western Denmark Heart Registry from January 2002 through June 2005 were followed up for 2 years. Data on death and MI were ascertained from national medical databases. We used Cox regression analysis to control for confounding. RESULTS: The 2-year incidence of definite ST was 0.64% in BMS patients, 0.79% in DES patients (adjusted relative risk [RR]: 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72 to 1.65), 0.50% in SES patients (adjusted RR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.35 to 1.15), and 1.30% in PES patients (adjusted RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.94). The incidence of MI was 3.8% in BMS-treated patients, 4.5% in DES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.51), 4.1% in SES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.15, 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.47), and 5.3% in PES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.81). Whereas overall 2-year adjusted mortality was similar in the BMS and the 2 DES stent groups, 12- to 24-month mortality was higher in patients treated with PES (RR 1.46, 95% CI: 1.02 to 2.09). Target lesion revascularization was reduced in both DES groups. CONCLUSIONS: During 2 years of follow-up, patients treated with PES had an increased risk of ST and MI compared with those treated with BMS and SES. Mortality after 12 months was also increased in PES patients.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):665-619232898
PubMed ID
19232897 View in PubMed
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5- and 10-year mortality in a rural middle-aged population at Haapavesi, Northern Finland, with special reference to ischaemic heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55583
Source
Cor Vasa. 1987;29(4):261-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
H J Juustila
J T Takkunen
M. Lilja
A J Jounela
M. Linnaluoto
M. Raudaskoski
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Cor Vasa. 1987;29(4):261-8
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cerebral Infarction - mortality
Coronary Disease - mortality
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Abstract
As a part of a larger prospective population study of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) the causes of 5- and 10-year mortality were analysed in 1554 rural inhabitants aged 40 to 59 years (90.0% of the population of this age group) in Northern Finland. The total mortality in 5 years was 2.3% among women and 6.3% among men. The respective 10-year mortality figures were 6.2% and 13.4%. The proportion of IHD as a cause of these deaths among women was 35% and 34% in 5 and 10 years, respectively; among men 46% and 46% of the deaths were due to IHD in 5 and 10 years, respectively. Among women the proportion of strokes was 22% and 19% in 5 and 10 years, respectively; the other causes of death among women amounted to 43% and 47% in 5 and 10 years, respectively. Among men, strokes resulted in the death of 14% and 7% in 5 and 10 years, respectively, the other causes of death amounted to 40% and 47% in 5 and 10 years, respectively. The incidence of IHD as a cause of death among women was higher than previously reported.
PubMed ID
3677715 View in PubMed
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21 year trends in incidence of myocardial infarction and mortality from coronary disease in middle-age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210947
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1495-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
P. Immonen-Räihä
M. Arstila
J. Tuomilehto
M. Haikio
A. Mononen
T. Vuorenmaa
J. Torppa
I. Parvinen
Author Affiliation
Health Office City of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1495-502
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study is to describe the 21 year trends in myocardial infarction among middle-aged inhabitants in the city of Turku, in southwestern Finland. Since 1972 the coronary register in Turku has monitored acute coronary events leading to hospital admission or death, first according to the methods of the World Health Organization Heart Attack Register Study, and since 1982 according to the methods of the WHO MONICA. From 1972 to 1992 we registered 7374 events of suspected myocardial infarction, of which 6045 events occurring in inhabitants of Turku aged 35-64 years, fulfilled the criteria for myocardial infarction. Within 28 days, 2266 coronary events proved fatal. During the 21-year period, the incidence of definite myocardial infarction fell by 55% in men and by 62% in women, and coronary mortality fell by 66 and 81%, respectively. From 1972 to 1982, total mortality and coronary mortality decreased in parallel. Later on, the decrease in total mortality levelled off, even though coronary mortality fell still steeper, because mortality from external causes of death increased. The favourable long-term trends reflect favourable changes in total cholesterol and blood pressure in the middle-aged population, and the improvement in the treatment of myocardial infarction. Further efforts are needed to enhance this trend, but also to reduce total mortality among middle-aged people.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1455-68909894
PubMed ID
8909905 View in PubMed
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The 2003 Canadian recommendations for dyslipidemia management: revisions are needed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175311
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2005
Author
Douglas G Manuel
Peter Tanuseputro
Cameron A Mustard
Susan E Schultz
Geoffrey M Anderson
Sten Ardal
David A Alter
Andreas Laupacis
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ont. doug.manuel@ices.on.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-31
Date
Apr-12-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Expenditures
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Hyperlipidemias - drug therapy
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Risk factors
Notes
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Sep;24(17):1601-1012964575
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 Jun 24;168(13):1644-5; author reply 1645-612821610
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2003 Nov;19(12):1359-6614631469
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2003 Dec;19(13):1499-50214760440
Cites: Am J Med. 2004 Apr 15;116(8):540-515063816
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Apr 21;291(15):1864-7015100205
Cites: Am Heart J. 1991 Jan;121(1 Pt 2):293-81985385
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Nov 5;339(19):1349-579841303
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 1999 Apr;15(4):445-5110322254
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 Oct 28;169(9):921-414581310
Cites: Fam Pract. 2003 Feb;20(1):16-2112509365
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Jul 24-31;288(4):462-712132976
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Jul 24-31;288(4):455-6112132975
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Dec 22-29;282(24):2340-610612322
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 May 16;162(10):1441-710834048
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Aug 22;163(4):403-810976255
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Jul 6;360(9326):7-2212114036
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Nov 8;173(10):1210; author reply 121016275979
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Nov 8;173(10):1207; author reply 121016275976
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1033-4; discussion 103715824410
Erratum In: CMAJ. 2005 Jul 19;173(2):133
PubMed ID
15824409 View in PubMed
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Achieving quality indicator benchmarks and potential impact on coronary heart disease mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131252
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Nov-Dec;27(6):756-62
Publication Type
Article
Author
Harindra C Wijeysundera
Nicholas Mitsakakis
William Witteman
Mike Paulden
Gabrielle van der Velde
Jack V Tu
Douglas S Lee
Shaun G Goodman
Robert Petrella
Martin O'Flaherty
Simon Capewell
Murray Krahn
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Schulich Heart Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. wijeysundera@gmail.com
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Nov-Dec;27(6):756-62
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Benchmarking - methods
Coronary Disease - mortality - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Revascularization - methods - standards
Ontario - epidemiology
Prognosis
Quality Indicators, Health Care - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
Quality indicators in coronary heart disease (CHD) measure the practice gap between optimal care and current clinical practice. However, the potential impact of achieving quality indicator benchmarks remains unknown.
Using a validated, epidemiologic model of CHD in Ontario, Canada, we estimated the potential impact on mortality of improved utilization on CHD quality indicators from 2005 levels to recommend benchmark utilization of 90%. Eight CHD disease subgroups were evaluated, including inpatients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), acute coronary syndromes, and heart failure, in addition to ambulatory patients who were post-acute myocardial infarction survivors, or had heart failure, chronic stable angina, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia. The primary outcome was the predicted mortality reduction associated with meeting quality indicator targets for each CHD subgroup-treatment combination.
In 2005, there were 10,060 CHD deaths in Ontario, representing an age-adjusted CHD mortality of 191 per 100,000 people. By meeting quality indicator utilization benchmarks, mortality could be potentially reduced by approximately 20% (95% confidence interval 17.8-21.1), representing approximately 1960 avoidable deaths. The bulk of this potential benefit was in ambulatory patients with chronic stable angina (36% of reduction) and heart failure (31% of reduction). The biggest drivers were optimizing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use in chronic stable angina patients (approximately 440 avoidable deaths) and ß-blocker use in heart failure (approximately 400 avoidable deaths).
These findings reinforce the importance of quality indicators and could aid policy makers in prioritizing strategies to meet the goals outlined in the Canadian Heart Health Strategy and Action Plan for reducing cardiovascular mortality.
PubMed ID
21920697 View in PubMed
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Adult body height, self perceived health and mortality in the Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55386
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1989 Dec;43(4):380-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
A M Peck
D H Vågerö
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1989 Dec;43(4):380-4
Date
Dec-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body Height
Coronary Disease - mortality
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Mortality
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to examine adult body height as an indicator of general health. DESIGN: The study was a survey of a randomly selected sample of the adult Swedish population obtained by the Swedish National Central Bureau of Statistics. PARTICIPANTS: The sample studied was identified in 1980-81 and comprised 14,757 persons aged 16-74. Of these, 12,695 (86%) consented to interview. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Information was obtained on adult height, socioeconomic status in childhood and adult life, self perceived health, self reported longstanding illness, and mortality during a six year follow up. The numbers of people in three height groups who considered their general health as bad, who reported any longstanding illness or who died during the follow up were compared with the expected numbers in the same groups. The number of persons with reduced health and the number of deaths was larger than expected in the shortest height group. The excess risk of dying in the shortest group (about 20% higher compared to the tallest group) was reduced but not eliminated when present and childhood socioeconomic group was taken into account. Coronary heart disease mortality in particular was linked to height. The shortest group of men and women reported the largest proportion with bad general health and longstanding illness. For the latter the differences between height groups disappeared after controlling for present socioeconomic status. CONCLUSIONS: There is a detectable excess risk of morbidity and mortality from being short. Assuming that the childhood environment is an important determinant of adult stature it is also important for adult health.
PubMed ID
2614330 View in PubMed
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Age dependence of the west/east gradient in cardiovascular mortality of Finnish males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239310
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1985;218(5):463-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
L. Tenkanen
L. Teppo
T. Hakulinen
E. Läärä
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1985;218(5):463-71
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Coronary Disease - mortality
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Sex Factors
Smoking
Abstract
A cohort of 4 475 Finnish men was followed up during 1964-80 in order to study regional differences in mortality from cardiovascular diseases, especially ischaemic heart disease (IHD). The west/east gradient in cardiovascular mortality recorded in several previous studies was greatly age-dependent. The excess eastern risk was a feature of younger age groups; with increasing age the risk pattern was reversed. The risk factors in IHD in eastern Finland have an element which somehow accelerates the process of this disease.
PubMed ID
4091046 View in PubMed
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Airway obstruction and the risk of myocardial infarction and death from coronary heart disease: a national health examination survey with a 33-year follow-up period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297762
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 01; 33(1):89-98
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Tiina Mattila
Tuula Vasankari
Harri Rissanen
Paul Knekt
Pauli Puukka
Markku Heliövaara
Author Affiliation
Heart and Lung Center, Helsinki University Hospital, Meilahti Triangle Hospital, HUS, 6th Floor, PO Box 372, 00029, Helsinki, Finland. tiina.m.mattila@fimnet.fi.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 01; 33(1):89-98
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Airway Obstruction - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Coronary Disease - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been associated with coronary mortality. Yet, data about the association between COPD and acute myocardial infarction (MI) remain scarce. We aimed to study airway obstruction as a predictor of MI and coronary mortality among 5576 Finnish adults who participated in a national health examination survey between 1978 and 1980. Subjects underwent spirometry, had all necessary data, showed no indications of cardiovascular disease at baseline, and were followed up through record linkage with national registers through 2011. The primary outcome consisted of a major coronary event-that is, hospitalization for MI or coronary death, whichever occurred first. We specified obstruction using the lower limit of normal categorization. Through multivariate analysis adjusted for potential confounding factors for coronary heart disease, hazard ratios (HRs) (with the 95% confidence intervals in parentheses) of a major coronary event, MI, and coronary death reached 1.06 (0.79-1.42), 0.84 (0.54-1.31), and 1.40 (1.04-1.88), respectively, in those with obstruction compared to others. However, in women aged 30-49 obstruction appeared to predict a major coronary event, where the adjusted HR reached 4.21 (1.73-10.28). In conclusion, obstruction appears to predict a major coronary event in younger women only, whereas obstruction closely associates with the risk of coronary death independent of sex and age.
PubMed ID
28688065 View in PubMed
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429 records – page 1 of 43.