Skip header and navigation

Refine By

84 records – page 1 of 9.

Alcohol consumption and ischemic heart disease mortality: are time-series correlations meaningful?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241478
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1983 Nov;118(5):641-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1983
Author
H W Gruchow
A A Rimm
R G Hoffmann
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1983 Nov;118(5):641-50
Date
Nov-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Canada
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Middle Aged
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
Recently, time-series correlations of aggregated data have been used to demonstrate the length of latency periods for environmental factors, such as economic conditions and alcohol consumption, in influencing heart disease mortality. Latency periods were specified by lagging mortality rates relative to the economic indicators or rates of alcohol consumption until the highest correlations were achieved. The tendency has been to interpret these correlations without regard to whether the latency periods described are biologically plausible. The authors have identified four models which represent all the possible outcomes of correlational studies of time-series data. Using United States and Canadian mortality rates in relationship to alcohol consumption, they have demonstrated the application of each of these models. For three of the four models, the time-series (lag) correlations are uniform regardless of the number of years mortality is lagged relative to alcohol consumption, and this uniformity does not permit a latency period to be identified. Only the lag correlations between two nonlinear variables show variations over time, depending on the degree of correspondence between the increasing and decreasing line segments of the two curves. Correlations ranging from high positive to high negative are possible, and several peak correlations (positive and negative) can occur. However, the biologic interpretation of multiple peaks with the same or different signs is problematic. The authors conclude that time-series correlations of aggregated data are not useful for the study of latency periods, and that analysis of time-series correlations for this purpose can be at best ambiguous, and at worst, completely misleading.
PubMed ID
6637991 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption and sudden coronary death in middle-aged Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235837
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;221(4):335-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
O. Suhonen
A. Aromaa
A. Reunanen
P. Knekt
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;221(4):335-41
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Death, Sudden - epidemiology - etiology
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk
Sex Factors
Abstract
The association between consumption of alcoholic beverages (spirits, beer and wine) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality, especially the incidence of sudden coronary death (SCD), was investigated in a 5-year prospective population study comprising 4,532 men aged 40-64 years. The amount of alcohol used was estimated on the basis of answers to a self-filled structured questionnaire. The incidence of SCD was statistically significantly lower among abstainers than among alcohol consumers. The relative risk of SCD of alcohol consumers in comparison with abstainers was largest in the oldest age group and it became more apparent after a follow-up of a couple of years. Only the consumption of spirits was positively associated with the incidence of SCD. Among non-smokers the incidence of SCD was statistically significantly higher in consumers than in abstainers, a similar but not significant trend was observed among current smokers. The positive association between alcohol consumption and incidence of SCD was detected both in CHD-free men and in men with prior CHD. Consumption of alcoholic beverages, and in particular of spirits, is associated with an increased risk of SCD in Finnish men.
PubMed ID
3604749 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcoholic intemperance, coronary heart disease and mortality in middle-aged Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12630
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;222(3):201-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
A. Rosengren
L. Wilhelmsen
K. Pennert
G. Berglund
D. Elmfeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Ostra Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;222(3):201-13
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - complications - mortality
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
High alcohol consumption is one of the major risk indicators for premature death in middle-aged men. An indicator of alcohol abuse--registration with the social authorities for alcoholic problems--was used to evaluate the role of alcohol in relation to general and cause-specific mortality in a general population sample. Altogether 1,116 men (11%) out of a total population of 10,004 men were registered for alcoholic problems. Total mortality during 11.8 years' follow-up was 10.4% among the non-registered men, compared to 20.5% among men with occasional convictions for drunkenness and 29.6% among heavy abusers. Fatal cancer as a whole was not independently associated with alcohol abuse, but oropharyngeal and oesophageal cancers together were seven times more common in the alcohol-registered groups. Total coronary heart disease (CHD) was significantly and independently associated with alcohol abuse, but nearly all the excess CHD mortality among the alcohol-registered men could be attributed to sudden coronary death. Cases with definite recent myocardial infarction were not more common in the alcoholic population. A combined effect of coronary arteriosclerosis and heart muscle damage secondary to alcohol abuse is suggested. Other causes of death strongly associated with registration for alcohol abuse include pulmonary embolism, pneumonia and peptic ulcer, as well as death from liver cirrhosis and alcoholism. Of the excess mortality among alcohol-registered subjects, 20.1% could be attributed to CHD, 18.1% to violent death, 13.6% to alcoholism without another diagnosis and 11.1% to liver cirrhosis.
PubMed ID
3425375 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol intake, serum beta 2-microglobulin and ventricular extrasystoles. Factors related to death in five-year follow up of middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12961
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1982;87(2):119-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982

Alcohol intemperance and sudden death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12582
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1987 Jun 6;294(6585):1456-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-1987
Author
H. Lithell
H. Aberg
I. Selinus
H. Hedstrand
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1987 Jun 6;294(6585):1456-8
Date
Jun-6-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - complications
Blood pressure
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Death, Sudden - etiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
Ten years after a health screening examination was offered to 50 year old men 32 of the 2322 participants and 12 of the 454 nonparticipants had died of ischaemic heart disease. Of these, 26 and 11 respectively had suffered sudden death, for which necropsy was performed. Half of the men who had died suddenly had been registered for alcohol intemperance up to 1973, which was four times the prevalence of such registrations in the general population. Registration at both the Swedish Temperance Board and the Bureau of Social Services was associated with an odds ratio of 3.74 for sudden death as compared with not being registered at either. Logistic analysis including the classical risk factors for ischaemic heart disease together with registration for alcohol intemperance and at the Bureau of Social Services showed only the two types of registration and systolic blood pressure to be independent risk factors. On the other hand, there was no overrepresentation of subjects entered in the registers among those surviving a myocardial infarction. For non-fatal myocardial infarction blood pressure and serum triglyceride concentration were significant risk factors and serum cholesterol concentration, smoking, and body mass index probable risk factors; the two types of registration were not independent risk factors. Alcohol intemperance is strongly associated with an increased risk of sudden death after myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
3111584 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analgesics and risk of coronary and other death in middle-aged men in eastern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241158
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1984;216(3):295-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
J T Salonen
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1984;216(3):295-9
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Analgesics - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Random Allocation
Risk
Abstract
The association between oral analgesics and the risk of death from ischaemic heart disease (IHD), cardiovascular disease, disease other than IHD, and any disease was studied in a cohort of 3551 men aged 30-59 years, based on a random sample from the population of eastern Finland. A number of potential coronary risk factors were allowed for in multiple logistic models. On the basis of these data, a regular use of oral analgesics is associated with a decreased risk of death from IHD. The relative risk was 0.6 with 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.2-0.9 for IHD death and 0.6 (95% CI = 0.4-0.9) for cardiovascular death. No significant association was found between oral analgesics and the risk of death from diseases other than IHD.
PubMed ID
6496187 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A quantitative assessment of the impact of diet on the mortality of heart disease in Denmark. Estimation of etiologic fraction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10365
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2000
Author
M. Osler
J. Godtfredsen
M N Grønbaek
P. Marckmann
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Panum Instituttet, afdeling for social medicin og psykosocial sundhed (Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab).
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Date
Sep-11-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to quantify the impact of different dietary factors on the mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. METHODS: Relative risks and knowledge on the distribution of different dietary factors were used to estimate etiological fractions. RESULTS: It is estimated that an intake of fruit and vegetables and saturated fat as recommended would prevent 12 and 22%, respectively, of deaths from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. An intake of fish among those at high risk for ischaemic heart disease, would lead to a 26% lower mortality, while alcohol intake among abstainers would have no significant quantitative effect. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that changes in dietary habits according to current recommendations would have an impact on public health in Denmark.
PubMed ID
11002740 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are poor living conditions in childhood and adolescence and important risk factor for arteriosclerotic heart disease?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41478
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 1979;2(2):238-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979

Association of long-term exposure to community noise and traffic-related air pollution with coronary heart disease mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125348
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2012 May 1;175(9):898-906
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2012
Author
Wen Qi Gan
Hugh W Davies
Mieke Koehoorn
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2012 May 1;175(9):898-906
Date
May-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
In metropolitan areas, road traffic is a major contributor to ambient air pollution and the dominant source of community noise. The authors investigated the independent and joint influences of community noise and traffic-related air pollution on risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in a population-based cohort study with a 5-year exposure period (January 1994-December 1998) and a 4-year follow-up period (January 1999-December 2002). Individuals who were 45-85 years of age and resided in metropolitan Vancouver, Canada, during the exposure period and did not have known CHD at baseline were included (n = 445,868). Individual exposures to community noise and traffic-related air pollutants, including black carbon, particulate matter less than or equal to 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter, nitrogen dioxide, and nitric oxide, were estimated at each person's residence using a noise prediction model and land-use regression models, respectively. CHD deaths were identified from the provincial death registration database. After adjustment for potential confounders, including traffic-related air pollutants or noise, elevations in noise and black carbon equal to the interquartile ranges were associated with 6% (95% confidence interval: 1, 11) and 4% (95% confidence interval: 1, 8) increases, respectively, in CHD mortality. Subjects in the highest noise decile had a 22% (95% confidence interval: 4, 43) increase in CHD mortality compared with persons in the lowest decile. These findings suggest that there are independent effects of traffic-related noise and air pollution on CHD mortality.
PubMed ID
22491084 View in PubMed
Less detail

84 records – page 1 of 9.