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87 records – page 1 of 9.

Source
Med Welt. 1975 Dec 5;26(49):2239-40 contd
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-5-1975
Source
Med Welt. 1975 Dec 5;26(49):2239-40 contd
Date
Dec-5-1975
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congresses
Coronary Disease - drug therapy
Humans
Isosorbide Dinitrate - therapeutic use
Nitrates - therapeutic use
Sweden
PubMed ID
1207466 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accelerated recovery of ischemic canine myocardium induced by AMP. Preliminary report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55698
Source
Adv Myocardiol. 1985;6:483-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
H M Sami
J R Koke
N. Bittar
Source
Adv Myocardiol. 1985;6:483-90
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine Diphosphate - metabolism
Adenosine Monophosphate - metabolism - pharmacology
Adenosine Triphosphate - metabolism
Animals
Coronary Disease - drug therapy
Creatine - metabolism
Dogs
Energy Metabolism - drug effects
Female
Male
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects
Nitroprusside - pharmacology
Phosphocreatine - metabolism
Abstract
Experiments were conducted on 18 dogs using an in situ blood-perfused canine heart model. Intracoronary infusion of AMP resulted in increased ATP and total adenine nucleotide levels. On reperfusion following a 15-min period of ischemia, ATP and total adenine nucleotide levels were significantly higher than control. Most important, contractile function recovered more rapidly in the AMP-treated dogs. It is therefore concluded that the delayed functional recovery noted after periods of ischemia is likely to be a direct result of delayed ATP resynthesis.
PubMed ID
3992046 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute myocardial infarction: contemporary risk and management in older versus younger patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228735
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1990 Jul-Aug;6(6):241-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Montague
R. Wong
R. Crowell
K. Bay
D. Marshall
W. Tymchak
K. Teo
N. Davies
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1990 Jul-Aug;6(6):241-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta
Coronary Disease - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Risk factors
Abstract
The in-hospital management and risk of death of 101 patients 70 years of age or older with acute myocardial infarction in 1987 (group 1) were compared with management and risk for 106 temporally matched patients less than 70 years old (group 2). In group 1, 49% had histories of previous myocardial infarction, compared to 25% in group 2 (P less than 0.001), and 23% of group 1 presented without cardiac pain, versus 7% of group 2 (P less than 0.001). Among the younger patients, other conventional risk factors were, in contrast, more common (Q wave infarction 84% in group 2 versus 70% in group 1; P less than 0.05) or higher (peak creatine kinase values 2222 iu/L in group 2 versus 1366 iu/L in group 1; P less than 0.001). Prior to infarction, all cardiac drugs were used more frequently in the older group 1 patients, whereas post infarction thrombolysis, beta-blockers and acetylsalicylic acid use were all more common (P less than 0.01 to P less than 0.001) in the younger group 2 patients. Post infarction exercise testing, left ventricular ejection fraction calculations and coronary angiography were all performed less frequently in group 1 (P less than 0.001). The in-hospital mortality was 35% for group 1 versus 7% for group 2 (P less than 0.001). Among all 207 study subjects, multiple logistic regression revealed thrombolysis, absence of cardiac pain, and age 70 years or older to be associated with the greatest relative mortality risk. Increased relative risk to a lesser degree was associated with previous infarction, male sex and post infarction use of antiarrhythmic medication.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2393836 View in PubMed
Less detail

At what coronary risk level is it cost-effective to initiate cholesterol lowering drug treatment in primary prevention?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52363
Source
Eur Heart J. 2001 Jun;22(11):919-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
M. Johannesson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 2001 Jun;22(11):919-25
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antilipemic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - drug therapy - economics - prevention & control
Cost-Benefit Analysis - economics - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The entire risk factor profile should be taken into account when considering initiating cholesterol lowering drug treatment. Recent treatment guidelines are therefore based on the absolute risk of coronary heart disease. We estimated at what coronary risk it is cost-effective to initiate cholesterol lowering drug treatment in primary prevention for men and women of different ages in Sweden. METHODS: The cost-effectiveness was estimated as the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained of cholesterol lowering drug treatment. Treatment was assumed to lower the risk of coronary heart disease by 31%. The analysis was carried out from a societal perspective including both direct and indirect costs of the intervention and morbidity, and the full future costs of decreased mortality. The coronary risk, in a Markov model of coronary heart disease, was raised until the cost per QALY gained corresponded to a specific threshold value per QALY gained. Three different threshold values were used: $40,000, $60,000 and $100,000 per QALY gained. RESULTS: The risk cut-off value for when treatment is cost-effective varied with age and gender. If society is willing to pay $60,000 to gain a QALY it was cost-effective to initiate treatment if the 5-year-risk of coronary heart disease exceeded 2.4% for 35-year-old men, 4.6% for 50-year-old men, and 10.4% for 70-year-old men. The corresponding risk cut-off values for women were 2.0%, 3.5% and 9.1%. CONCLUSIONS: The results can serve as a basis for treatment guidelines based on cost-effectiveness.
PubMed ID
11428815 View in PubMed
Less detail

Better adherence to antihypertensive agents and risk reduction of chronic heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149554
Source
J Intern Med. 2009 Aug;266(2):207 - 18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
S. Perreault
A. Dragomir
M. White
L. Lalonde
L. Blais
A. Bérard
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montréal, QC, Canada. sylvie.perreault@umontreal.ca
Source
J Intern Med. 2009 Aug;266(2):207 - 18
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Coronary Disease - drug therapy - mortality
Databases, Factual
Female
Heart Failure - mortality - prevention & control
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Public Health - statistics & numerical data
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
Antihypertensive (AH) agents have been shown to reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events including chronic heart failure (CHF). However, the impact of changes in patterns of AH agents use on CHF is unknown. Our objective was to estimate to which different patterns of AH agent use is associated with the occurrence of CHF in a population-based study.
A cohort of 82 320 patients was reconstructed using the Régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec's databases. Patients were eligible if they were between 45 to 85 years of age, had no indication of cardiovascular disease and were newly treated with AH therapy between 1999 and 2004. A nested case-control design was used to study the occurrence of CHF. Every case of CHF was matched for age and duration of follow-up to a maximum of 15 randomly selected controls. Adherence level was reported as a medication possession ratio. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the rate ratio (RR) of CHF adjusting for different covariables. The mean patient age was 65 years, 37% were male, 8% had diabetes, 19% had dyslipidaemia and mean time of follow-up at 2.7 years. High adherence level (95%) to AH therapy compared with lower adherence level (60%) was associated with an additional reduction of CHF events (RR: 0.89; 0.80-0.99). Risk factors for CHF were being on social assistance, diabetes, dyslipidaemia, higher chronic disease score and developing a cardiovascular condition during follow-up.
Our study suggests that a better adherence is associated with a significant risk reduction of CHF. Adherence to AH therapy needs to be improved to optimize benefits.
Notes
Comment In: J Intern Med. 2010 Mar;267(3):335; author reply 33620201922
PubMed ID
19623691 View in PubMed
Less detail

Better knowledge improves adherence to lifestyle changes and medication in patients with coronary heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53242
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):321-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Carin Alm-Roijer
Martin Stagmo
Giggi Udén
Leif Erhardt
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Malmö University Hospital, S-205 02, Malmö, Sweden. Carin.Alm-Roijer@skane.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):321-30
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - drug therapy - nursing
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Patient Education
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Many patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) are not managed adequately, and we often fail to reach treatment targets. AIM: To investigate if knowledge of risk factors for CHD, measured by a questionnaire, would show any relation to advice to compliance to lifestyle changes to attain treatment goals and adherence to drug therapy. METHOD: Men and women
PubMed ID
15572021 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Can we afford good cholesterol lowering therapy? Budgeting of statin costs versus medical needs in the county of Stockholm]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47626
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Nov 28;98(48):5472-3, 5476-8, 5481-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-28-2001
Author
B. Wettermark
P. Hjemdahl
Author Affiliation
Huddinge Universitetssjukhus, Stockholms läns landsting, ledamot av LAKSAKs expertgrupp för hjärt-kärlsjukdomar i Stockholms läns landsting.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Nov 28;98(48):5472-3, 5476-8, 5481-3
Date
Nov-28-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage - economics
Budgets
Coronary Disease - drug therapy - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy - prevention & control
Drug Costs
English Abstract
Health Priorities - economics
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - drug therapy - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines
Primary Prevention - economics
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Increasing drug costs are a concern in Sweden. The costs for statin treatment are considerable, and among those increasing most rapidly (by 30-35% per year). Our survey of eligibility for statin treatment in Stockholm according to current Swedish recommendations (i.e. patients 100 M extra for patients > 75 years and/or high cardiovascular risk. We propose that individual risk assessments should replace crude patient group recommendations to obtain reasonable "numbers needed to treat", i.e. to optimize the expenditure on statins and cost-effectiveness of the therapy. Prioritization of drug expenditures (within and between patient categories) must be debated, and medical needs must be made clear to those who determine the medical budget.
PubMed ID
11769362 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular morbidity, mortality and pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260575
Source
Psychol Med. 2012 Nov;42(11):2275-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
M. Lahti
J. Tiihonen
H. Wildgust
M. Beary
R. Hodgson
E. Kajantie
C. Osmond
K. Räikkönen
J. Eriksson
Source
Psychol Med. 2012 Nov;42(11):2275-85
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Stroke
Abstract
Patients with schizophrenia have excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Previous studies suggest that this may be partly due to inadequate somatic treatment and care, such as non-optimal use of lipid-lowering and antihypertensive pharmacotherapy, but longitudinal studies on such aetiological pathways are scarce.
We investigated the use of lipid-lowering and antihypertensive pharmacotherapy, and the risk of hospitalization for and death from coronary heart disease and stroke among patients with schizophrenia in a birth cohort of 12 939 subjects (Helsinki Birth Cohort Study). This cohort was followed for over 30 adult years by using national databases on cardio- and cerebrovascular hospitalizations and mortality and on reimbursement entitlements and use of drugs for treatment of hypertension, dyslipidaemia, coronary heart disease and diabetes.
Individuals with schizophrenia had a higher risk of hospitalization for coronary heart disease [hazard ratio (HR) 1.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-2.57], and mortality from this disease was markedly higher (HR 2.92, 95% CI 1.70-5.00), particularly among women (p=0.001 for women, p=0.008 for men). Women with schizophrenia had also marginally increased stroke mortality (p=0.06). However, patients with schizophrenia used less lipid-lowering (odds ratio 0.47, 95% CI 0.27-0.80) and antihypertensive drug treatment (HR 0.37, 95% CI 0.22-0.61).
In this longitudinal study, coronary heart disease morbidity was increased and coronary heart disease mortality markedly increased in patients, especially in women with schizophrenia. These patients nevertheless received less antihypertensive and lipid-lowering treatment.
PubMed ID
22405504 View in PubMed
Less detail

The case for aggressive lipid-lowering therapy. Proceedings of a satellite symposium of the XIX Congress of the European Society of Cardiology. Stockholm, Sweden, 26 August 1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54319
Source
Eur Heart J. 1998 Oct;19 Suppl M:M1-36
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Source
Eur Heart J. 1998 Oct;19 Suppl M:M1-36
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Antilipemic Agents - therapeutic use
Coronary Disease - drug therapy
Humans
PubMed ID
9821009 View in PubMed
Less detail

87 records – page 1 of 9.