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[10-year mortality of patients admitted to coronary units with or without confirmed diagnosis of myocardial infarction. A relation to anamnesis and diagnosis at discharge]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48374
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jul 3;157(27):3894-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-3-1995
Author
J. Launbjerg
P. Fruergaard
J K Madsen
L S Mortensen
J F Hansen
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk afdeling B, Hillerød Sygehus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jul 3;157(27):3894-7
Date
Jul-3-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coronary Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Patient Admission
Patient Discharge
Prognosis
Risk factors
Time Factors
Verapamil - therapeutic use
Abstract
The ten-year mortality in patients with suspected myocardial infarction with (AMI) and without (non-AMI) confirmed diagnosis was evaluated in 1897 non-AMI patients and 1401 AMI patients who were consecutively admitted to hospital during The Danish Verapamil Infarction Study. The following risk factors contained independent prognostic information about mortality for non-AMI patients: age, previous AMI, sex and diabetes. In patients with AMI the risk factors were: age, previous AMI, clinical heart failure, diabetes and angina pectoris. When the diagnosis at discharge for non-AMI patients was included in the Cox-analysis, only the diagnoses of bronchopneumonia, musculoskeletal disorders and observation only of added prognostic information. We conclude that non-AMI patients are at high risk for mortal events in the long-term. High risk patients can be identified from the medical history and should be carefully evaluated regarding coronary artery disease at the time of discharge in order to improve the risk stratification, treatment and prognosis.
PubMed ID
7645063 View in PubMed
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The 2011 outcome from the Swedish Health Care Registry on Heart Disease (SWEDEHEART).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108055
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jan Harnek
Johan Nilsson
Orjan Friberg
Stefan James
Bo Lagerqvist
Kristina Hambraeus
Asa Cider
Lars Svennberg
Mona From Attebring
Claes Held
Per Johansson
Tomas Jernberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease, Skåne University Hospital, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jan.harnek@skane.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Care Units - standards
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Registries
Secondary Prevention
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) collects data to support the improvement of care for heart disease.
SWEDEHEART collects on-line data from consecutive patients treated at any coronary care unit n = (74), followed for secondary prevention, undergoing any coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, percutaneous valve or cardiac surgery. The registry is governed by an independent steering committee, the software is developed by Uppsala Clinical Research Center and it is funded by The Swedish national health care provider independent of industry support. Approximately 80,000 patients per year enter the database which consists of more than 3 million patients.
Base-line, procedural, complications and discharge data consists of several hundred variables. The data quality is secured by monitoring. Outcomes are validated by linkage to other registries such as the National Cause of Death Register, the National Patient Registry, and the National Registry of Drug prescriptions. Thanks to the unique social security number provided to all citizens follow-up is complete. The 2011 outcomes with special emphasis on patients more than 80 years of age are presented.
SWEDEHEART is a unique complete national registry for heart disease.
PubMed ID
23941732 View in PubMed
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5993 survivors of suspected myocardial infarction. 10 year incidence of later myocardial infarction and subsequent mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54402
Source
Eur Heart J. 1998 Apr;19(4):564-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
S. Galatius
J. Launbjerg
L S Mortensen
J F Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine B. National University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1998 Apr;19(4):564-9
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Cause of Death
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Care Units
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
AIMS: To evaluate the 10-year incidence of later infarction and subsequent mortality, as well as predictors of later infarction, in patients with suspected myocardial infarction and alive on day 15 after admission. METHODS AND RESULTS: 5993 patients admitted with suspected myocardial infarction and alive on day 15 after admission were registered in The First Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial database in 1979-81. 2586 had definite infarction, 402 probable infarction and 3005 no infarction as they fulfilled 3, 2 and 1 criteria for infarction. They were followed for 10 years with respect to later infarction and death, i.e., including death after later infarction. The 10 year infarction rate after index admission was 48.8% in definite, 47.3% in probable and 24.6% in no infarction patients (P 65 years with definite or probable infarction. CONCLUSION: The 10-year infarction rate in patients with suspected myocardial infarction in whom the diagnosis is ruled out is lower than in those with definite or probable infarction, but the mortality after a later infarction is similar in all three groups.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1998 Apr;19(4):534-59597397
PubMed ID
9597404 View in PubMed
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[A chest-pain-unit. A complement to the department of myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54659
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 May 8;93(19):1835-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-1996
Author
J. Herlitz
B W Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Kardiologidivisionen, Sahlgrenska sjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 May 8;93(19):1835-6
Date
May-8-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - diagnosis
Cardiology Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Chest Pain - diagnosis
Coronary Care Units
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis
Sweden
United States
PubMed ID
8667815 View in PubMed
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[A coronary care unit adopts primary care nursing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248146
Source
Infirm Can. 1978 Nov;20(11):31-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1978
Author
M. Medaglia
Source
Infirm Can. 1978 Nov;20(11):31-4
Date
Nov-1978
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Care Units
Coronary Disease - nursing
Humans
Primary Nursing
Quebec
PubMed ID
251159 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A coronary care unit implements primary nursing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247933
Source
Kangogaku Zasshi. 1979 Jan;43(1):58-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1979
Author
M. Medaglia
Source
Kangogaku Zasshi. 1979 Jan;43(1):58-62
Date
Jan-1979
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Coronary Care Units
Humans
Primary Nursing
PubMed ID
105178 View in PubMed
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Acoustics and psychosocial environment in intensive coronary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70774
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Mar;62(3):e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
V. Blomkvist
C A Eriksen
T. Theorell
R. Ulrich
G. Rasmanis
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Stockholm, Sweden. vanja.blomkvist@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Mar;62(3):e1
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics
Adult
Aged
Coronary Care Units
Female
Health Services Research
Hospital Design and Construction
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Occupational Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Principal Component Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Speech Intelligibility
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Stress, strain, and fatigue at the workplace have previously not been studied in relation to acoustic conditions. AIMS: To examine the influence of different acoustic conditions on the work environment and the staff in a coronary critical care unit (CCU). METHOD: Psychosocial work environment data from start and end of each individual shift were obtained from three shifts (morning, afternoon, and night) for a one-week baseline period and for two four-week periods during which either sound reflecting or sound absorbing tiles were installed. RESULTS: Reverberation times and speech intelligibility improved during the study period when the ceiling tiles were changed from sound reflecting tiles to sound absorbing ones of identical appearance. Improved acoustics positively affected the work environment; the afternoon shift staff experienced significantly lower work demands and reported less pressure and strain. CONCLUSIONS: Important gains in the psychosocial work environment of healthcare can be achieved by improving room acoustics. The study points to the importance of further research on possible effects of acoustics in healthcare on staff turnover, quality of patient care, and medical errors.
PubMed ID
15723873 View in PubMed
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[Acute coronary syndromes. Simplified routines with early exercise test performed at the intensive coronary care units]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50203
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Dec 15;90(50):4565-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1993
Author
A. Ståhle
R. Nordlander
A. Ohlsson
L. Rydén
E. Mattsson
Author Affiliation
Kardiologiska kliniken, Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Dec 15;90(50):4565-8
Date
Dec-15-1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Clinical Competence
Coronary Care Units - manpower - organization & administration
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - physiopathology
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Intensive Care Units - manpower - organization & administration
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden
Syndrome
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1994 Feb 9;91(6):469-707755667
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1994 Feb 9;91(6):4708114576
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1994 Feb 9;91(6):470, 4758114577
PubMed ID
8264295 View in PubMed
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240 records – page 1 of 24.